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Wolf 15" modular gas + 24" induction cooktop - functional set up?

ostrich
January 12, 2019

Just as I thought that I was done with the cooktop/rangetop decision (gas vs induction), I just saw the Wolf 15" modular gas cooktop + 24" induction cooktop option!


I just did a search and know that there had been many threads about this, but I could not find the answers to my questions so please bear with me. While this sounds like a great combo for me (induction for the "clean" daily cooking, while the powerful gas burner (22K BTU) would be great for wok cooking, here are my questions:


1. The Wolf 24" induction cooktop only has a maximum power output of 3100W (with boost) for the largest zone). This is much less than what their 36" induction cooktop offers (3600W max). Since I have never used an induction cooktop before, is this power output going to be too low for pan frying with a 12" pan? If the 24" induction cooktop had the 3600W output (with boost) then it's a bit of a no-brainer for me....


2. For those of you with this (or similar) set up - as the gas burner will be sitting right on the side of this set up, do you find that stirring fry there will cause a big messy splash everywhere on the countertop?


3. Do you find it inconvenient to have 2 relatively small cooktop areas that are on 2 different levels, so that moving the cookware from one spot to another to be annoying? Or is this not an issue?


4. For the ventilation set up, will you then go with a 42" vent hood?


Thank you so much in advance for your help!

Comments (27)
  • PRO
    GreenDesigns

    No one who put in both uses the gas. And they all regret putting in the gas. Get all induction for everything. Don't look back.

    ostrich thanked GreenDesigns
  • ostrich

    Thank you. I personally want to go all induction, but my family wants to keep gas, that's why I am trying to compromise!

  • PRO
    GreenDesigns

    It's your kitchen, not theirs. Buy them a grill with an auxiliary side burner for the putdoor kitchen.

  • rmsaustin

    Green Designs is right. I did a combination gas/ induction from Bertazzoni - aways used induction unless I had more than two pots/pans going. When the induction side broke (I would never buy the Bertazzoni brand of anything again, but that’s another story), I replaced it with 36“ Wolf induction.

    ostrich thanked rmsaustin
  • ostrich

    Thanks, rmsaustin. I know, I know.... but you know how important it is to make the family happy! They want to carry on using their usual pots and pans which are not induction compatible. They want to do wok cooking which is not that great with induction... :-(


    Anyway, is 31,000W of boosted power good enough for induction cooking? Or is that a bit weak really?

  • kaseki

    First, let me disabuse you of the belief that frying will need maximum wattage. High induction power is mainly relevant to shortening the time a given quantity of water will get to boiling. Frying on a normal pan is more likely to take a "3" or "4" setting once the pan is up to temperature. (Of course, this is dependent on how much heat the pan can radiate and how moist the material to be fried is.) Even searing meat on a gridded cast iron pan will not require full power unless one is into extreme temperatures (and has the ventilation to deal with it).

    The exception can occur with wok cooking. (I have an auxiliary 3500W Cooktek wok hob next to my 36-inch induction cooktop -- 3500W is roughly equivalent to a 30 kBTUh gas burner.). When cooking by portions a large quantity stir-fry, and then combining all of the materials for a final blast with the sauce ingredients, there will be enough material and liquid to require full power to quickly steam off the excess moisture. More modest quantity wok cooking can be done on the regular induction hobs just as it can be achieved on a 20 kBTUh gas burner, but pan handling and hot zone size can vary with pan and hob size.

    ostrich thanked kaseki
  • mabeldingeldine

    I have a 36" induction cooktop, which is ok, but I'll go back to gas in my next house. The only advantage I see is it is easier to clean. Gas is soul satisfying.


    If you are the primary cook and prefer induction, then I'd use induction, I think it would defeat the only advantage of induction to have a gas hob next door.

    Induction does look sleek: https://www.houzz.com/discussions/5547389/reveal-budget-diy-ikea-kitchen#n=3

    ostrich thanked mabeldingeldine
  • ostrich

    Thank you, kas and mabeldingeldine!


    mabeldingeldine, it's interesting to hear your perspective - what type of cooking do you do mostly that makes it more satisfying with gas? I am curious to learn as I am weighing up the pros and cons of each system. Thanks!


    kas, really good points here! Thank you. So if I go with a 36" wolf or Miele induction cooktop, it will have a 3600W area with boost, so that should be good enough for wok cooking of a modest quantity, depending on the cookware that I use then. But with the gas burner (22K BTW), though it does not have as much power, it may have the advantage of having a larger heated surface area and also the fact that I can use my regular cookware and also move the wok around too... would that be a fair summary?


    So I should not worry too much about the 24" induction cooktop only having 3100W power on boost, because the only real disadvantage is that boiling water may be not as fast.


    In our cooking, we use cookwares with different types of materials for different foods (e.g. stoneware for certain types of slow cooking) and so having that gas option is a nice one, otherwise, we will need to change out most of the cookware.... which is not an insignificant thing. Really something to think about.


    Regarding ventilation, if I do this set up (15" + 24" = 39") should I then go to a 42" vent hood rather than a 36"? I am leaning towards the professional series in Vent-A-Hood.


    Thank you again for all the great and helpful comments!

  • mabeldingeldine

    Having to change cookware was the worst part of induction. I loved my old cookware, especially a 5 qt. soup pot I had. I purchased a set of Cuisinart multiclad, but am not thrilled with them it is so hard to find good cookware. Man, I miss that soup pot.

    ostrich thanked mabeldingeldine
  • ostrich

    mabeldingeldine, I think that is a really valid point! We all have our favourite cookwares and how could we just stop using them!? I used a magnet to test them out last week and most of them failed.... that's when I was leaning towards gas again!!! Sigh....

  • wekick

    No one who put in both uses the gas. And they all regret putting in the gas.“

    All?

    What about when there is more than one cook as in the OP’s situation? Some people just prefer gas for any number of reasons laid out on many threads. What if one of the cooks has a pacemaker or ICD? You would always have to be mindful of staying 24” away with the induction hob so it might not be something you want to use. I totally understand not wanting to give up your favorite cookware. There are some work around using plates to heat under noncompatible pans but it seems cumbersome to me.

    There are sometimes things that induction won’t do. Some people cook on the open flame. They may toast a tortilla, blister a pepper, toast a marshmallow etc. Some people cook with the sides of the pan as well as the bottom. If you use a round bottom wok, you might not like the difference between the flame and induction. Some people like oversized canners or more than one canner at a time which can be a problem.

    There are also differences in induction appliances so you would have to look at those and compare what you are buying to gas. What specific advantages/disadvantages will you have with one or both in addition to those above? I would not want one where I have to be worried about what size pan I can use or how high can I turn the burner if they share power.

    I have 6 gas burners plus a couple of induction plates. I use both but would never give up the gas. I do understand some people would never go back to gas but it is far from “all”.

    ostrich thanked wekick
  • ostrich

    wekick, thank you for your insightful comments! I had not thought of the pacemaker/ICD issue, so that is great to know! Thank you.


    Since you have both gas and induction, I am really curious as to what you use each for. Is there any particular type of cooking or food that you would use gas vs induction for please? That would be really helpful for me to know, as I am going through this journey now.


    Thank you again!

  • PRO
    GreenDesigns

    The pacemaker thing has been debunked for years. Over the years, there have been many many threads on here and elsewhere asking if those who chose induction missed gas. Maybe 3 out of 1000 replied being less than fully happy with induction. Most of them were men, who just had the gut reaction to fire. Grunt, grunt. Research it yourself. .3%

    Everyone else would give up everything else in their new kitchen if they could just keep their induction. Good cookware isn't that hard to find. Even IKEA sells a very reasonably priced set. As do most local restaurant supply houses. Reasonable all the way up to o my goodness.

    ostrich thanked GreenDesigns
  • wekick

    I think you can adapt most cooking to either but a lot depends on what induction cooktop/range you buy. Induction plates are not as powerful as the induction hobs in a cooktop or range. I mostly use them for simmers or as a hot plate for a buffet isn't a a real test of a more powerful hob.

    Most differences as I notice are as I said above. There are work arounds for some. I prefer gas for a wok but some people have a specialized induction wok hob or use a flat bottomed wok and are perfectly happy. Some are even happy with a round bottom wok on induction. I am cooking for a lot of people sometimes so if the skilket is full I like that the sides heat well too with gas as I might push things up the side until they cook down. Of coarse things that require a flame can't be done on an induction as above but some have other sources of an open flame.


    I would look at your whole situation. For some people the ease of cleaning is why they like induction. It takes a hard look at what works for you rather than what the majority of the people say is best.


    I love my collected cookware. Most is vintage so French copper, aluminum or French enamel on cast iron(which might work better on induction). I have a really big aluminum overlay griddle that I really like. I like the size of my rangetop because I use big pans.


    If you're a person who needs to come home from work and get hot water or something else going on a burner, induction might be for you. I am more of a cookie sheet dinner person, even before the concept was popular because I want to throw it in the oven and sit down for a little bit. The speed of the cooktop doesn't mean that much to me.


    I just like gas. I like the flame. Aside from the things I listed above, it is just a highly subjective thing that I can't articulate.




    ostrich thanked wekick
  • wekick

    “GreenDesigns

    The pacemaker thing has been debunked for years.”

    You might want to read up a little on that.

    Here is one article from 2018, but always ask the cardiologist or electrophysiologist who put it in. There may be some that are shielded but a lot aren’t. Find out what happens to your device if it comes into contact with a strong magnet. What do you need to do? You can find studies that show interference and some that do not. Does yours just revert to a non therapeutic mode or shut off? To avoid the problem, stay 24” away. Not everybody wants to have to remember that though.

    http://www.wwl.nhs.uk/Specialities/Cardiology/pacemaker_faq.aspx

    There is marketing literature that says “no problem”. “Just test it out by walking slowly up to a burner and see if you get light headed”, which is very irresponsible not knowing anything about how your pacemaker or ICD works. I like to err on the side of caution. I knew someone who was a medical professional, very young who had a pacemaker. Someone came up a slapped a “therapeutic” magnet on their shoulder at a medical convention and they had to go to the ER.

    Maybe 3 out of 1000 replied being less than fully happy with induction. Most of them were men, who just had the gut reaction to fire. Grunt, grunt. Research it yourself. .3%”

    I do agree with researching the pros and cons of each and the capabilities of specific appliances. Researching your numbers are irrelevant to the OP. Even if something is best for 99% of people, it might not be best for them. Anytime you start saying “all”, giving numbers with no supporting data, or making demeaning comments about people’s choices, to me you lose credibility. Even if let’s say 97% that chose induction exclusively, which is a different situation than ostrich who wants both, were happy and would not go back, there are many more in real numbers that have made an informed well thought out decision to choose gas to begin with. There are also many that have both and see utility in both. You must not read the same stuff I read.

    For you ostrich, an assessment of the your needs and the people you cook with, correlation with features of various appliances and an individualized plan rather than a blanket recommendation will serve you well.

    ostrich thanked wekick
  • kaseki

    A point to add to the earlier discussion: Power boost can be initiated from an off hob, but (at least on the Electrolux and its clones) cannot be reached from operating at lower settings. If the cooktop guts are cool enough, one could shut off the hob and turn it back on in power boost mode. For most induction units that I'm aware of, power boost mode also has limitations in numbers of hobs operating on the same power supply and time of operation. In other words, the induction cooktop guts are inadequately cooled for continuous operation in power boost mode. I would use the continuous max power as the value to compare for any significant wok time.

    With induction, both the specialized Cooktek configuration as well as the flat surface standard cooktops, I would suggest avoiding typical wok motions, and just move the food within the wok. Lifting is ok, but temperature changes are easier (especially with the Cooktek) by using the cooktop controls. For flat surface wok cooking, one might want to use a small hob under a larger pan, moving food into and out of the central zone. This would require using a thin steel pan rather than a clad pan intended for temperature uniformity. With flat pans, a hot oil frying zone puddle in the center will not be present. This may or may not matter depending on the food item and cooking approach.

    For hood design with two cooking units, one has two choices: widely separated and adjacent. The former requires two smaller hoods; the latter require a large hood for which the flow rate has to be that demanded by the worst case cooking over the entire entry aperture.

    Layout has to consider how the counter is supported by the underlying cabinets. Putting both cooktops in very close proximity is difficult and usually not desirable from a support point of view -- particularly with stone. Separation for support by two cabinets will increase the required hood size to overlap the units at both ends.

    ostrich thanked kaseki
  • kaseki

    Last, ideal is the enemy of good enough. Hundreds of millions of Asians have successfully cooked with woks on very modest wood or coal fires historically and electric coil or small gas burners more recently. If Chinese restaurant capability is wanted, then none of normal gas, electric coil, or induction will achieve it -- restaurant wok burners start at 100 kBTUh and have knee controls for power.

    ostrich thanked kaseki
  • ostrich

    Thank you so much, kaseki, for the insightful comments! I had not known about the booster situation with induction cooktops. Interestingly, after reading your comments, I went to check out both the Miele and Wolf websites. It appears that both have about the same max power, but the booster is a bit more powerful with Miele. Then with Wolf, even though both the 24" and 36" models have a max rating of 2600W, the 24" cooktop's booster rating was 3150W while the 36" cooktop's booster rating was 3600W. You are so right, we need to look at the regular power, not just the booster power which is short-lived!


    I chatted with my family this afternoon. While the combo set up seems to satisfy both needs, it does seem to "reduce" the useful cooktop surface area, as we will have only a 24" induction surface, together with a gas burner that will only fit one thing there. It is indeed something to think about. Indeed, the combo price will be over $1200 more than the nice Wolf 36" Contemporary gas cooktop. It is certainly a consideration.


    Thank you again!

  • ostrich

    Just found a photo of the Wolf 24" induction + 15" modular gas burner - while they add up to be 39" the cooking surface seems a bit cramped there, doesn't it?! Hmm....




  • waverley66

    Not loving it. Aesthetically or functionally. I don''t like the look of the different levels. Will you be happy with one gas burner? And I feel it cheapens the look of very expensive appliances. I'd go with one or the other.


  • waverley66

    If they were both the same height it would look better.

  • ostrich
    waverley66, thank you so much for this - I thought that too and am so glad that my thought was supported by someone else!!! Thank you!!!

    Then 36" induction or gas is the question...
    hmm....
  • waverley66

    Ok, this is my own personal opinion. I absolutely love the look of a big pro looking gas range or rangetop ( when the dials are on the front. Not on the top. ) Because I'm lazy and hate cleaning and find the grates on a gas cooktop so heavy to lift, I personally am going with induction. I cook far less on the stove than I do in my ovens. So everything I have read about induction works for me. When I had a big viking rangetop in one of my other houses, I cooked even less. I would fry an egg and have to clean 6 grates.

    Just to throw a spanner in the works,( I know you wanted the Miele oven, why don't you look at the Miele 36 inch gas range with steam assist oven ( if there is one). ( the induction range only comes in 30 inch.

  • ostrich
    Thanks waverley66! I thought if that too but I had dual fuel ranges in my last 2 houses and I really wanted to have a separate oven now because the range made it difficult for someone to use the oven while another person is using the stove.... and we use the stove a lot. The oven was also sitting too low for me too.... and with the design of my new kitchen it would be much more streamlined to have a cooktop or rangetop. I was going with a rangetop until I saw the ventilation requirements... ouch.

    So, it's either a 36" induction or gas cooktop now. I also would love an induction cooktop but the cookware issue and family preference are pushing me back to the gas... hmm....
  • waverley66

    You really have thought through every aspect of how you best use your kitchen. One trick I learned about decision making is to present the scenario of "What if?" . As in " What if you learned you could not go with gas and could ONLY put in induction, what would your reaction be?" Perhaps I should follow my own advice.......

    Although my issue now is more based on spatial design, layout and to walk in pantry or not to walk in pantry and trying to find a designer who will just do planning without supplying the cabinetry and contracting.

    ostrich thanked waverley66
  • ostrich

    waverley66, thank you! I thought about what you said over the weekend.... if I did not get the induction cooktop, then I would have more cleaning to do with the gas cooktop! LOL! On the other hand, if I did not get the gas cooktop, then I will hear it from my family later.... ha ha ha....


    In the end, I ended up going with the gas cooktop. I hope that I made the right decision!


    As for your own issue now, I thought that many designers would do a planning without supplying the cabinets and contracting too? Surely someone would do that, right!? Oh yes, please go with the walk in pantry. You will not regret it! :-)

  • PRO
    GreenDesigns

    Buy a countertop hob and let the family use it for a while before deciding.

    And there are many designers only that aren't out to sell you cabinets. A lot even post here. Try https://www.houzz.com/pro/icookinmykitchen/the-cooks-kitchen is part of my state NKBA chapter, and she does a lot of remote design.

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