samouton

Professional Advice for adding apron sink

samouton
August 12, 2019

I am in the process of updating my kitchen and would like to add an apron sink. I am keeping the existing counter tops and would like to know if the granite can be cut to add the sink without replacing the entire slab?? Thank you in advance for your advice.



Comments (17)

  • PRO
    GreenDesigns

    Some fabricators have the skill to do this. Most don’t. Expect to pay almost as much as buying new counters. It’s a very niche market , and those with the skills can set their own prices.

  • samouton

    Thank you for your advice, very helpful.

  • PRO
    CDR Design, LLC

    Yes. Most fabricators will tell you they cannot guarantee damage to the existing counter. Also, realize there will also be cabinet work to complete. The apron will drop down to the level below the top of the existing doors, meaning the entire cabinet will have to be replaced/reconfigured.


    May I ask why you want an apron sink?



  • PRO
    CDR Design, LLC

    Realize also that the entire base cabinet will have to be replaced/reconfigured, as the apron will drop below the height of the existing base doors. Why do you want an apron sink?

  • samouton

    I just like the look of it and thought I could do it with a minimal cost factor. I appreciate your advice.

  • PRO
    CDR Design, LLC

    I understand. You are smart to check into it before taking it on. I try to recommend to my clients to go for more timeless designs. Soon the apron sink will fade. Seeing only the one photo, right now your kitchen looks very timeless and classy,

  • samouton

    Thank you!!! I just changed my backslash and will be painting my cabinets and just thought I could update the sink. Also, thought about adding an under mount sink with one bowl.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    "The apron will drop down to the level below the top of the existing doors, meaning the entire cabinet will have to be replaced/reconfigured."


    A full apron sink (apron is as deep as the bowl) would, but a short apron sink will not. Short apron sinks are specifically designed to have the apron be the same depth as the bottom of the drawers. The cabinet front is tapped off, the top rail and center divider are removed, the sink and front are reinstalled together.

    I can do this in six hours, plumbing included, but I'm really good at it.

  • PRO
    CDR Design, LLC

    Thanks, Joseph. Most clients do not like the look of a short apron, as they feel it sort of loses the effect, but thanks for pointing that out.

    An undermount sink with one bowl might be a possibility. Looks like it is going to look great!

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    "... if the granite can be cut to add the sink without replacing the entire slab?"


    Yes, I do this regularly.


    Please measure and mark the distance from your cabinet front to the front edge of your top. Now measure from the mark to the rear of your sink cut out. If it's 18 1/2" or less, you can install a Kohler 3943 or an Elkay Quartz Luxe without needing replacement stone in the rear or having a 3943 customized with a faucet deck.


    Here is your job:

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    "Expect to pay almost as much as buying new counters."


    It depends. I couldn't run a successful sink replacement business without bringing value to customers. If your kitchen is small and with as cheaply as many granite fabricators work these days, top/sink replacement may be more cost effective, however, you're still going to get a cheap $39.00 Chinese sink.


    My customers have to be comfortable in the $3,000.00 budget range, but that beats the cost of replacing $6,000.00 worth of countertops by half. Plus they're getting a magazine-quality sink, something they aren't getting for 6 large.

  • canamrider07 .

    That new apron sink Joe installed looks way better than that old SS undermount. I can't see the homeowner in 10 years saying "I wish we kept that old sink"

  • samouton

    Joe thank you so much for offering your services but you are in Florida and I'm in Texas. You all have been so great with your advice. I think I will just stick with what I have for now. Thanks again and have a great week!!!

  • PRO
    Patricia Colwell Consulting

    Good idea IMO apron front sinks need to be planned from the beginning or not at all I personally don’t see anadvantage so will never have one

    samouton thanked Patricia Colwell Consulting
  • PRO
    CDR Design, LLC

    Happy to help!

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    "I personally don’t see anadvantage so will never have one"

    Were you in a wheelchair you might. I had a customer point out to me how nice it was to have her sink front lowered an inch and a quarter.

  • PRO
    Pete's Home Innovations

    Hi - yes, this can be done, if you have the right people. Mr. Corlett is to humble : )

    Here is a great example of a job he did doing this. You have to drop the sink out the bottom and then getting the sink in from below is key. Best way to do this is with the right mounting system. sinkmount.com This is likely cheaper than your local contractor trying to mount a sink from below and this will give you much greater flexibility getting the sink located exactly right. You want to be careful that you do not put too much pressure upward on your countertop or it will eventually crack, even if it is composite but especially if it is natural stone which is actually quite brittle. This was a Kohler Whitehaven installation in the Tampa area where Mr. Corlett has throngs of satisfied customers. Top to bottom shows the before, during and after. Fantastic cut and polish on the stone! Good luck with your project!





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