bitethebaitfishing

Asian Citrus Psyllid Pest?

Julian H
August 20, 2019

Hello Everyone I hope all is well

so I was at a local big box store today and I usually like to pass through and check out the fruit trees, They had a very nice selection of dwarf Orange & Lemon trees available which is rare in my area. while I was looking closely at the foliage I spotted what looked like a psyllid of some sort, I am curious to read your thoughts and get some sort of confirmation. Pictures will be included in comments below.

Julian.

Comments (24)

  • Julian H thanked carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
  • Glenn Jones(9b)

    I agree with Carol.

    Julian H thanked Glenn Jones(9b)
  • Meyermike(Zone 6a Ma.)

    Whata shame, because those are pretty tall and good looking trees for the price. That size they fetch over 80 dollars for one on the left, and over 100 for the ones on the right here.

    Julian H thanked Meyermike(Zone 6a Ma.)
  • Julian H

    Thank you for providing the link Carol I checked it out and pretty much confirmed my suspicion

  • Julian H

    Mike I agree it’s a total shame I am the type that likes to see something and buy it in person but these days I find most of the big box store trees have pests present or have already been damaged.

  • Jodi

    In what state were these pictures taken ?

    Julian H thanked Jodi
  • Meyermike(Zone 6a Ma.)

    Julian, I was wondering the same thing as Jodi. What state are you in ?

    Mike

    Julian H thanked Meyermike(Zone 6a Ma.)
  • Kelley_GA8a

    I would notify your local ag extension and/or state department immediately. Did you see who the nursery is?

    Julian H thanked Kelley_GA8a
  • nulesm

    This is the unfortunate reality of trying to grow citrus in the citrus belt very discouraging . Not sure if I have this right , the nurseries must propagate there citrus in very protected screen houses but the big retailers don't need to have a protected area to display their citrus . Kind of defeats the purpose . You have to feel for the industry and the dooryard citrus grower when you see this . Very sad .

    Brian

    Julian H thanked nulesm
  • dirtygardener -- Z9a, N. Central Florida

    I do hope you reported them. People who don't know better will buy and plant them and then the entire neighborhood will lose all its trees. UF is developing some promising new strains that are immune to greening, but the prevailing wisdom is that Florida is going to have to move to other crops. With laurel wilt killing all the avocados and greening on the citrus and now bronzing on the palms, I think that Florida's agricultural/horticultural landscape is going to be changing drastically over the next 20 or so years.

    Julian H thanked dirtygardener -- Z9a, N. Central Florida
  • Meyermike(Zone 6a Ma.)

    Brian, buddy, it is a shame! Now our Banana crops!! One of my favorite fruits. Seems like our whole food chain is under assault! Scary

    https://abc7chicago.com/food/banana-killing-fungus-may-cause-shortage-of-fruit-increase-in-prices/5470472/

    Julian H thanked Meyermike(Zone 6a Ma.)
  • dirtygardener -- Z9a, N. Central Florida

    Yes, this is the problem with monocropping with just one variety. Cavendish has been due to this to happen for many years. I'm not surprised at all that the day is finally here. It's going to happen to the US too, if they don't stop monocropping soy beans, corn and wheat. GMO's will not save the farmers if a disease or insect immune their poisons decides to destroy their crops.


    I remember far enough back that the most resistant tomatoes were VFN. Then the crops got hit with a huge outbreak of tobacco mosaic virus, so then it was VFNT. Now it's got so many letters, I can't even count them all. Double letters where the strains have mutated to be immune to the previous protections. This chart of all the abbreviations is insane!

    https://www.deruiterseeds.com/en-au/resources/tomato-disease-resistance-abbreviation-guide.html

  • dirtygardener -- Z9a, N. Central Florida

    As for our food supply being under assault, the worst thing that can happen is that we'll have to go back to "the olden days" when we had to eat what was in season and could be grown nearby. That wouldn't be such a bad thing, would it? I grew up like that, and it was just a fact of life. We had apples in fall, citrus in winter, hardly anything in spring, but summer -- oh glorious summer! We could hardly wait for all the summer fruits; peaches, pears, plums, apricots, and berries, berries, berries! I sort of miss those days. In fact, there are still a few things we can anticipate, such as Washington cherries in the summer and Georgia peaches (they really are better than CA peaches, and SC peaches are even better), and summer plums.

    Julian H thanked dirtygardener -- Z9a, N. Central Florida
  • Julian H

    Hi Jodi These pictures were taken in Sunrise Florida.

  • Julian H

    Brian it’s really unfortunate because these trees looked like fresh arrivals, my question is if the growers are drenching the soil/roots shouldn’t the trees be immune to the Psyllid For a certain amount of time.

  • Bob

    Hate to say this, I do believe the worst has yet to come. A solution might be far of, I hope not. Ultimately I do not know how far north it eventually goes.I not brazen for it.

  • sautesmom Sacramento

    How is there not a quarantine at that Home Depot?
    Sacramento County has clear no transport rules For a while all our Farmers' Markets had to put nets over all the produce for sale.
    Of course California protects its farmers with strict produce rules since agriculture is our biggest export. People complain, but one look at what citrus greening in Florida has done, and we should be grateful. So sad.
    Carla in Sac

  • melikeeatplants

    It’s been popping up in California as well. Unfortunately citrus will suffer the same fate there just a matter of time

  • nulesm

    Hi Julian I wish I knew the answer to your question sadly I don't know. I agree with you those trees are real beauties and definitely not 1 gallon trees . I definitely would stay clear and far away from those trees sadly .


    Mikey thats at unbelievable what next ? I wish that I could grow bananas up here but they would just take up to much space . Good news remember the impatiens flower which happens to be my go to annual , there back they were off the market for a few years something was killing them off . Who knows maybe they will find the cure someday for our fruit trees and may I say the sooner the better . Mikey did you hear about the huge forest fire in the Amazon very very scary.

    Brian

  • Bob

    Are you saying that Houzz citrus forum is a thing of the past, or membership dwindling to just a handful. Boy, I hate to see my collection going down the drain. Just paid $2.98 for a bag of 12 mandarins, eat one, not bad. Wal-Mart $3.49. Why grow them. Banana $0.18 a pound.

    ”But” you can always grow something else if hlb shows up in your orchard, how about one of these?





    Second flowering.



    Have a bunch of others, a tree ripened peach?, not too shabby.

    Mike, Brian, wouldn’t worry about HLB, by the time it reaches that far north, you be looking like Santa Claus.

  • Meyermike(Zone 6a Ma.)

    Bob, I would have to put on a few hundreds pounds and grow out all my hair gray, including the beard. lol You are right, I can't imagine those pests going that far north or even surving our brutal winters and lack of any warm sunshine for months on end. Good luck to thm. They should bring a winter jacket and anti depression pills before they decide to hitch hike our trees.

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