SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
megs1030

My Lacanche range arrived!

megs1030
last year

Bright and early this morning, my Cluny 1400 in Chantilly was delivered at 8:30 as I was putting my kids on the bus. After some crate inspection, the driver was on his way. My contractor carefully uncrated it and she is a beauty... at least to me. I cannot wait until I can cook (just a few more days, hopefully)!


Comments (80)

  • K R
    last year

    I want to see it in the Kitchen! Make sure to post lots of pics.

  • megs1030
    Original Author
    last year

    @slsunrise, thank you for your kind words. Perimeter cabinets will mostly be a white with subtle gray glaze. The color is very close to the Chantilly. Island, bank of cabinets with fridge / freezer columns and a butler pantry are SW Naval. Are you purchasing a Lacanche?

  • Related Discussions

    Should I tell my sister it arrived broken?

    Q

    Comments (34)
    Wow, looked the pattern up and it is beautiful! Such a great gift. Replacements Limited has lots of different pieces in stock...although their prices are pretty high. Is there a chocolate pot? It is listed in the $700.00 range! I have lots and lots of china which sadly, I do not use often enough. My mother's : and this wonderful pink and white set called Historic America....all show different areas of Boston.With those and several other sets I have, I could have a sit down dinner for about 48 people! Yikes, what would I serve?
    ...See More

    48" Ranges - Capital, NXR and American Range

    Q

    Comments (8)
    Patricia, Most of our clients opt for a 44" (equivalent to a North American 48") or larger stove. While I agree that most don't "need" that much cooking power on a regular basis, they certainly appreciate the flexibility of having 2 ovens, including a smaller one to use everyday (faster heating time, less energy wasted). Having one large oven only is not always convenient either. A larger range also gives you more flexibility on how you use your burners. It would be a very boring world if we all had the same needs, desires and priorities, no? :) Back on topic for Melissa, I think you'll find that every brand has great and not-so-great reviews. I can only say that one of our clients is an enthusiast cook and was almost set on a Capital before deciding on Lacanche. I have seen NXR in person but never used one. Regardless of the brand you choose, make sure that you can find a service technician in your area. All 3 brands you are considering look "basic" (in a good way, no touchscreen, keypad, iPad connectivity, etc) and should be fairly straight-forward to work on if anything happens.
    ...See More

    Help me choose my range hood please

    Q

    Comments (21)
    Hot pans, griddles and grills emit steam, grease, and odor depending on their contents. This effluent rises as a plume that expands as it rises. Measurements have been made of the plumes' velocities versus angles for various cooking conditions (mainly commercial). Because the goal of a hood is effluent capture and containment, and because the hood flow rate is never high enough to "suck up" effluent from the cooking surfaces, it is necessary for the hood to overlap the plumes (at least the higher velocity parts thereof). The major part of the plumes expand at roughly a ten-degree angle from vertical. If you put a pan on the cooktop and measure where a stick at 10-degrees ends up, you can see that the hood needs to overlap the pan bases. It may or may not need to overlap the entire range depending on hood height. So the expansion angle and height drives not only the hood width, but also the hood front-to-back dimension for full capture. One can minimize the required front-to-back depth if a concerted effort is made to not cook greasy stuff on the front burners (induction hobs). The acceptability of this compromise must be determined by the homeowners.
    ...See More

    Lacanche Range Color?

    Q

    Comments (4)
    It is exceedingly difficult to determine color on a computer monitor. My suggestion is to contact Lacanche and order some actual samples of the colors you are considering and look at them in person. Those Lacanche ranges are gorgeous, and I would have a hard time deciding on which of the colors to get. You should get the samples and then work the room around the color of the range.
    ...See More
  • slsunrise
    last year

    Oooh, I love that! Did you do a color match to Chantilly or is it a specific color? I did a test patch to the Ben Moore color that Chantilly is based off of. The test looks much more yellow. Yes, I am ordering!

  • megs1030
    Original Author
    last year

    @slsunrise, we matched the Chantilly to the cabinets. When we visited the NYC showroom, Elisa showed me the chantilly chip and I debated it with Ivory. The range sits across from the Naval island. The Naval cast a really odd gray / green shadow onto the Ivory chip, so we nixed that option. Part of me wishes we went with a fun color, but I have to say that the Chantilly is timeless, classic and really beautiful (imo). What model range are you going with? What colors are you debating? Did you look at BM White Dove??

  • slsunrise
    last year

    I tend to prefer a crisp white, but the white chip pulled a blue in my house. Chantilly is most definitely timeless - I can't wait to see next to your cabinets! Are they installed? I have been debating between white and green cabinets. Lacanche is a definite, though! I am getting Chassagne with 2 induction burners.

  • megs1030
    Original Author
    last year

    Cabinets are installed but we hit a major snag with our counters so no pics yet. It's been a nightmare! Could you colorblock your cabinets? Perhaps a green "hutch" style piece to hold your dishes? Or green on bottom and white on top? Green island? Some dreamy greens have been popular lately! You will love your range... I didn't realize you could install 2 induction hobs.

  • slsunrise
    last year

    @megs1030 - hi! I'm just circling back to see if you have a picture yet? Dying to see!

  • ILoveRed
    last year

    That range is beautiful. May I ask a question? If it ever needs service..is it easy enough to find service? Honestly, I love your range.

  • T B
    last year

    So lovely! Can't wait to see everything after you find your countertops (I saw a couple of your threads about that drama; I'm so sorry!) I know it's all going to be stunning in the end. That range and your cabinets already glam up the plywood ;)

  • shead
    last year

    Lovely range! Question, though, what are the sizes of the ovens? Our pizza pan won’t fit into a 27” wide oven :/

  • megs1030
    Original Author
    last year

    @ILoveRed, if it ever needs service, Art Culinaire is great and very accessible. Granted, we have not needed service as it's only been installed about 6 weeks. The range itself, based on my understanding, is easy to service and not complicated. My GC was able to install with his electrician... no special service people required.


    @T B, thank you so much!


    @shead, the ovens are smaller, but Lacanche does offer a few different models with larger ovens.

  • slsunrise
    last year

    @megs1030 omg I love love it!! Looks amazing. Thank you for sharing!

    megs1030 thanked slsunrise
  • M
    last year
    last modified: last year

    The nice thing about basic gas appliances is that they tend to be really easy to service. This is true for a lot of the higher-end ranges, especially if you pick a model that eschews electronics. I only have personal experience with Bluestar, which takes this design paradigm very much to heart. But from looking at it, I would expect LaCanche to be very much the same. It should be very easy to have it serviced locally, as long as you can find a technician who is used to working with different brands -- especially, if they are used to working with commercial ranges, as those often work the same way.

    As for the smaller ovens, I do like the huge oven in my Bluestar. Once or twice a year, it really comes in handy and saves a lot of time. But over the years, I have come to appreciate the fact that small ovens are quite important. They preheat much faster. And you can have multiple of them doing different things at the same time. Given the choice, I'd rather have two small ovens than one large one. If in doubt, I can always buy two smaller pans rather than one oversize one. So, I think LaCanche really is onto something here. Their design not only looks great, but also is really functional. In my case, I addressed the need for small ovens by supplementing 24" wall ovens (Miele CSO).

    For my particular needs, Bluestar turned out to be a better fit (I love super high-BTU wok burners and my awesome IR broiler). But every time I see a LaCanche, I am drooling just a little bit. If I had to buy a new gas stove, these would probably be the only two brands I'd look at.

    @megs1030, congratulations on your beautiful range and thanks for posting more pictures.

  • PRO
    Filipe Custom Woodwork
    last year

    Looking forward to updates. :-)

  • megs1030
    Original Author
    last year

    @M... agreed. Everything appears to be fairly basic on the oven. No fancy electronics or digital timers. I would also assume it will be fairly easy to service, should the day ever arrive. Crossing my fingers we are a loooong way off from that.


    The ovens do take some getting used to, I did have to get some new roasting pans and such, but it made birthday shopping super easy for my husband. Ha! I'm learning to love them and adjust some cooking. I will say that the smaller ovens do heat up faster and tend to cook right on time. Once I get counters installed, I'll be up and running here! I've actually never cooked with a wok, but the Lacanche range came with a wok ring, so I'll be trying that out real soon!


    Thanks for the kind words about the range. I'm sure your Bluestar has served you well.. I know they get a lot of love on these boards!

  • waverly6
    last year
    last modified: last year

    I thought I'd asked this already but apparently not, I am so loving seeing all the reports about your gorgeous range. What are the functions of the different ovens? I need to know what you have cooked and all the details.

  • M
    last year

    Cooking with a wok is fun. It follows a bit of the same principle as a French top. When using a round-bottom wok, the center will be hotter than the sides. So, you can push food around depending on how hot you want it to get.


    If you buy a carbon steel wok, the thin material will be super responsive to temperature adjustments. And after seasoning it, it'll be non-stick and super easy to clean. Just make sure it never gets stored when it is still wet.


    Look up the America's Test Kitchen recipe for seasoning carbon steel. I've never done it myself, but it sounds like one of the more fool-proof ways of doing it.


    The wok's high side walls are great, because they contain a good amount of the splatter that you'd otherwise get with frying or searing foods. That's why I regularly use it even when cooking Western dishes.


    Make sure you buy both the wok, the lid, and the spatula. You need all three parts. I am fortunate to be able to buy good woks at my local store. But I have heard generally good things about The Wok Shop. I'd probably look at either https://www.wokshop.com/newstore/product/iron-pow-wok/ or https://www.wokshop.com/newstore/product/hand-hammered-carbon-steel-pow-wok-hollow-metal-wooden-handle/. I'd pick the 14" round-bottom model with the metal handle.


    But you can probably reach out to the wok shop and ask them for recommendations.

  • megs1030
    Original Author
    last year

    @waverly6, my apologies if I missed your question earlier. The tall, narrow oven door on the left is a warming cupboard. It also acts as a slow cooker. I don't do much slow cooking and with my lack of counters, I haven't tried it yet. Once I host a holiday dinner, I will be anxious to use it. It fits a ton, comes with 4 or 5 racks, so I can imagine all the sides fitting in there as the main course finishes cook time.


    @M, thanks for the info. I never would have thought to purchase a wok with the lid, didn't realize that was necessary. Thank you!! I'm guessing you don't recommend one from All Clad or one that is non-stick?

  • M
    last year

    I'm guessing you don't recommend one from All Clad or one that is non-stick?


    Most non-stick coatings don't actually do all that well with high temperatures. I think, Teflon starts degrading at somewhere around 400°F. This is fine, if you mostly sauté foods. But a wok is all about high heat cooking. Non-stick is just not a great fit.


    If you have a stove that doesn't output a lot of power or that doesn't output any heat in the center of the burner, then a wok with a lot of thermal mass and/or good conductivity is possibly a work-around for this issue. With my range, I can get in excess of 20kBTU with most of it focused in the center of the wok. That makes it very attractive to use thin material that is very responsive. Also, carbon steel is generally really nice for frying anyway.


    I have never used the wok burner (or wok ring) on a LaCanche. I don't know how much power it outputs nor whether it has a cold spot in the center. Hopefully, since this is one of the advertised use cases, it works really well. And in that case, I would eschew any multiply woks or any cast iron woks. They are just going to be really heavy and hard to handle, without actually cooking as nicely.


    But please do report back, when you had a chance to try things out.

  • megs1030
    Original Author
    last year

    The center burner has an output of 18k BTU... so I'm guessing that should suffice. I'll have to check about the cold center... I've used the power burner plenty of times, you'd think I'd notice! I will look into the links you sent above. Thank you!

  • waverly6
    last year

    Megs1030, no need to apologize, you didn't miss my question. I think you (or someone else) may have posted the range on a different thread and I asked there ( and I believe it was answered, but I can't remember the answer. I'm not sure if the warming cupboard works similarly to the Aga simmering oven. ( do you know what the temperature range of it is?), but you may want to look at Aga groups. If you are on facebook, join the group, I love my Aga. People post the most amazing recipes and delicious dishes that they cook in it. If it is not hot enough to cook, you will have great use for it as a warming drawer. I love my warming drawer in my home kitchen and use it for a lot.


  • HeatherInOR
    10 months ago

    So pretty!

  • Kim Hood
    10 months ago

    Your range is a beauty. Can I ask how long the entire process was? I ordered mine Dec. 6, 2019 at the sweet NYC showroom. We are building a home but I am curious how long you waited for arrival from order date to actual delivery day? Thank you! I live in Rhode Island.

  • megs1030
    Original Author
    10 months ago

    @Kim, I honestly can't remember. I would think that today's current situation may be slowing things down. Did Elisa give any indication if the factory is shut down due to Covid?

  • PRO
    Art Culinaire
    10 months ago

    Bonjour Kim!


    The factory was in fact subject to the government - mandated shutdown in France, but is slowly reopening this week. While Air Freight is not currently an option, Sea Freight is still in operation; please email shipping@frenchranges.com for any updates regarding delivery, or myself personally at blair@frenchranges.com and I'll be happy to put you in the right hands.

  • Jo Boswell
    15 days ago

    Hello! It's been awhile since your posting so I hope you'll update! I am considering a Lacanche and am wondering how you have been enjoying yours? Thanks!


  • megs1030
    Original Author
    15 days ago

    @Jo Boswell, we love our range. If you do some searching for Lacanche on these boards, you’ll see I chime in frequently.

  • Jo Boswell
    15 days ago

    One of the biggest questions I have is how to determine ovens. I like the idea of having both gas and electric, but the interesting configurations and sizes have me stumped. Your particular range is one I'm considering, the other is the Sully (the 55" that has two bigger ovens). Do you like the size of your ovens? Has it changed the way you cook? Do you use your warming drawer? Thanks Megs!



  • megs1030
    Original Author
    15 days ago

    Pre-Covid I used my warming cupboard daily to keep my husband’s dinner warm as i was driving my kids to and from sports practices. Now, I don’t use it as often since he’s been home since March. I’ve used it for holidays to keep side dishes warm, it fits SO MUCH! My husband is returning to his office some time in March, so I imagine I’ll be using it more often. you can also use it to slow cook, make yogurt, proof bread, etc.


    I do love the size of my ovens! I have not had to change the way I cook, but have had to swap out some larger pans for smaller ones. Sometimes I wonder if I should have purchased a range with larger ovens like the Sully. Cookie baking during the holidays took a little longer because my cookie sheets are smaller. And there is one recipe from Ina for brownies that I haven’t tried because a 1/2 sheet pan does not fit. But other than that, I’ve been able to cook / bake / roast everything I’ve wanted to... even a 20 pound turkey.

  • Jo Boswell
    15 days ago

    Thank you for your input. We have a warming drawer now and honestly don't use it! I may be leaning more towards the larger ovens. BUT I love the look of that oven configuration~It is just different than any other typical range, whereas the Sully is more of a common look. Seriously though, how darn beautiful are they? Do you do regular maintenance cleaning on the brass burner covers? And what hood did you use? Pictures please oh please??? :)

  • HeatherInOR
    12 days ago

    I use 13x18” baking sheets in my Cluny ovens. I’ve been able to cook everything I have wanted to:). I’m trying to use the warming oven more, including heating serve-ware. I use the gas oven for meats and the electric for regular baking.

    We were just 9 days without power, and I was so thankful for my gas oven and cooktop!

    We used the Vent a Hood magic lung.

  • HeatherInOR
    12 days ago

    I forgot to mention... we use our wok ring frequently with a carbon steel 14” wok. Love it! Here’s a better range pic... she’s a beauty!❤️🔥

  • Jo Boswell
    11 days ago

    Heather, do you use your warming drawer often? Do you proof bread or any other "cooking" rather than just keeping things warm? Or warming plates? Thank you. Your Lacanche is a beaut!

  • Jo Boswell
    11 days ago

    OH! Another question (sry)! Do you use your gas oven for regular cooking (like side dishes/veges) as well as for meats? What else does the gas cook well? TY!


  • megs1030
    Original Author
    11 days ago

    @Jo Boswell, I use the gas oven for meats, baking bread, sometimes to cook veggies. I mostly use the electric oven.


    @HeatherInOR, thank you for sharing that you can fit 13x18 cookie sheets in your oven. Can you show me how they fit? I purchased some and could not, for the life of me, figure it out. So I’ve been using 1/4 sheet pans for the last year, but would love to use larger ones!

  • HeatherInOR
    11 days ago
    last modified: 11 days ago

    Hi @megs1030 - the lip of the pan just has to be able to sit under the back of the baking rack. You can either slide pan under or push rack against the back of the oven and then butt the pan against it.





    megs1030 thanked HeatherInOR
  • HeatherInOR
    11 days ago
    last modified: 11 days ago

    @Jo Boswell I’ve been trying to research which foods cook better in gas vs electric heat. Here’s a interesting article https://aroundthehouses.com/gas-oven-vs-electric-oven/.

    I have used my warming oven to proof bread and it works well. I’m trying to get in the habit of using it when I cook for company- has worked well for brunch items. We use it after we pull meat off the smoker. I guess I’m happy to have the warming option since I haven’t felt like I’m missing anything by not having the larger ovens. I’m definitely pleased that I have both elec and gas!

    I’m trying to use the French plate more... in hindsight I don’t know if I would have been happier with the exposed burner?? I just picked up Simone Beck’s cookbook, Simca’s Cuisine, at a used bookstore and am pretty excited to try some of her party menus and am thinking the plate will be perfect for that!

    The burners cook hot, IMO. I can’t imagine doing anything but boiling water on the 18 k. I use the 15 k and found I much prefer using enameled cast iron to my all clad because of how hot it gets, even on low. 11k are my most used burners, besides the induction (love,love!) .

    I don’t do much maintenance on the burners- that would be a losing battle for me!😂 Every once in awhile I’ll do a little barkeepers friend. I do love the patina the brass knobs and handles are acquiring... so mellow and lovely.




  • Jo Boswell
    11 days ago

    Thank you Heather! I've been reading oven sizes and was just worried as they are much smaller than what I'm used to but I only have one oven now and it is a bigger size. I started to realize, most of the time I have one lonely item in that big oven! So two that are a bit smaller is really much better. I wasn't sure if I'd use the warming drawer but it would be fun to try bread making! Also, I make clotted cream which has to cook for 12 hours in a very low setting so the warming drawer would be perfect! There is another stove that has the warmer, 2 ovens and an electric broiler instead of an additional storage drawers, Have you heard any comments on that? I read where it was great for pizzas!


  • HeatherInOR
    11 days ago
    last modified: 11 days ago

    The Chagny was very tempting! I don’t know much about it. I remember reading that the broiling oven definitely has a learning curve to get food to cook without burning. My kitchen is pretty small so space is valuable- I’m glad to have the storage drawers. It’s really hard to decide, they are all so gorgeous!

    i remembered one more thing I thought about with the Chagny- that lower oven is really low! Something to think about when dealing with potentially very heavy, hot pans.

  • megs1030
    Original Author
    11 days ago

    Just wanted to chime in and say I actually use the power burner frequently, followed by the 11’s. I agree that they do run hot. Anytime I’m cooking ground beef or need to sear meat before throwing it in the oven, I use the power burner. I also use my tagine with a little cast iron buffer plate between the burner and tagine (can’t remember the actual name of the plate) to help decrease the heat a bit.


    You can broil in the electric oven, just wanted to point that out as well. We considered the Chagny but ultimately decided we didn’t need a third oven.

  • Jo Boswell
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    I think that is where we are too, Megs. And Heather, you are right, that oven sits very low so in and out with pots/food would be difficult. I have also been researching copper pots and Duparquet makes a lovely copper plate for the heat diffuser. Any recommendations on how many people we'll need to move the range up a few steps and into the house? ( https://duparquet.com )

  • PRO
    THE FRENCH BARN - Lacanche Canada
    5 days ago

    @Jo Boswell,


    you'll need at least two people to move the range, with a good set of lifting straps. There are some inexpensive versions with harnesses that help spread the load over the shoulders / back. It's a small investment that will always come in handy to move not only the range but also bulky pieces of furniture.

    A 40" range is relatively easy to move with the proper equipment and 2 "regular" people (not particularly strong). Once you get to the 55" and up, the ranges are significantly heavier and do require two stronger persons to lift safely. Steps of course add a little bit of difficulty, you can either go up slowly if the "carriers" are confident, or build a longer, gentler ramp if the configuration of the space allows.


    Either way, the most important thing to remember is to never use the towel bar or oven door handles to lift or move the range, as this will damage the enamel. If necessary, it's also quick to remove the storage drawers and oven doors to shed a fair amount of weight off the range.


    Patrick

  • megs1030
    Original Author
    5 days ago

    The delivery truck driver hauled my range up the driveway all by himself and into my garage. My cabinet installer, a guy on his crew and the lead electrician were able to get it in my house. Again, I have the Cluny 1400, so a bit larger than what you are purchasing.


    As for the heat diffuser, I can’t remember where I ordered mine. But it’s cast iron.

  • HeatherInOR
    4 days ago

    Hubs and I moved the Cluny 1400 up about 3 steps and into place ourselves with harness straps and range lengthwise. Took off everything we could... doors etc.😂🤪

  • M
    4 days ago

    Took off everything we could... doors etc.😂🤪


    I had a very disturbing image there for a moment. And then I read the last two words of your sentence and it made so much more sense. Whew. That was a close call.

  • lucky998877
    4 days ago

    M, 😆😆😄

  • megs1030
    Original Author
    4 days ago

    Kudos to you @HeatherInOR! That is quite a feat!


    LOL at @M!

  • HeatherInOR
    4 days ago

    @m that sounds dangerous! 😂

  • Corie Hall
    yesterday
    last modified: yesterday

    Jo, I made clotted cream in my warming oven and it turned out fantastically! I almost thought I was in Devon! :)