kellysn

Is this Leathered Granite or Marble?

kellysn
8 days ago
last modified: 7 days ago

Scratching very easy by our dishes as seen by the pictures, and just installed 8 months ago. Any thoughts if this is leathered granite or marble? Thank you







Comments (73)

  • M Miller
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    "Corian has a 50-year-proven track record as a superior countertop, it is often excoriated"

    I think excoriated is too strong a word. Many people agree with you that Corian is practical for a kitchen (though I had one decades ago that had a permanent burn mark glaring on its whiteness). What it's all about is the gorgeousness of the OP's stone, versus the appearance of Corian.

    I personally would live with the scratches. The stone is beautifully patterned and I would not have noticed the scratches if the OP hadn't pointed them out. Life is too short. People have had marble in their kitchens for a thousand years.

  • kellysn
    6 days ago

    Did the lime test overnight on the cutout in my garage and this what I had this morning. (top left corner you can see the lime slice mark)


  • Related Discussions

    Leathered Absolute Black Granite

    Q

    Comments (46)
    No, I actually love your idea. Your space is big enough to do what you came up with. The contrast will be amazing. Plus, you're getting two absolutely superior materials for your kitchen. If you're interested in learning more about Super White, you can do so here http://aquagranite.com/super-white-quartzite-everything-need-know/ and more about black granite countertops, including leathered Absolute Black, here http://aquagranite.com/black-granite-countertops-sophistication-kitchen/. Good luck with your project!
    ...See More

    White marble versus granite for kitchen countertops? Love the white marble but worried about staining

    Q

    Comments (5)
    Marble is a living stone, meaning it will change with use unless it’s sealed often. It’s a beautiful stone that will attain a patina from body and cooking oils. It will wear where it’s most often used. If you want a truly old world look, then don’t seal it. Use it and know that it will change look and color over time. If you want that crisp look of marble without the maintenance, look at quartz.
    ...See More

    Super White Granite, is it Quartzite, Granite or more like Marble?

    Q

    Comments (24)
    Not really. Quartzite has issues of maintenance as well. It can etch. You need to seal and reseal and maintain the surface. All natural stone requires maintenance. I would recommend buying a good quality stone polish and use that weekly as well to help protect the polished finish. Some customers buy the quartzite in a honed finish to prevent the "etching" issue but you lose the dramatic color intensity of the stone when it's honed unless you color enhance.
    ...See More

    Is brushed/leathered granite out?

    Q

    Comments (13)
    Carmer90, It has been SUPER easy to clean! Grease splatters, drips, and full on spills wipe right up. I'm told it was sealed, but I'm also told it's a very dense stone. I mostly clean it with my dishrag, I do have a granite cleaner/sealer spray (method brand) but I really only pull that out periodically, maybe once every 2-3 weeks? (It's just a spray on wipe right off thing, no buffing or anything) I even accidentally let what I thought was going to be a problem stain happen on it last week. I had some Waterlox in a red, plastic Solo cup on the counter while I was doing another project in the kitchen. Apparently some Waterlox dripped down the side, it left a red ring on the stone. I didn't see it right away, it's a section of the counter I don't use very often... so it sat a couple of days! (Don't judge, LOL!!!) it didn't wipe off with my dishrag and I had to fight down a mild panic attack... so I got out my Method granite cleaner and sprayed it down, I noticed red on my rag after the first wipe so I was encouraged to keep trying. It took a little elbow grease and a little scraping with my fingernail but it all came up and you cannot tell it was ever there. Whew!!!! It seems to be impervious to oils and acids. I'm a messy cook and with 5 teenagers my kitchen gets a LOT of use. I cook a lot of Asian, Indonesian, Tex-mex, and southern dishes... we like a lot of flavor and use high heat a lot. The one downside is I have put tiny chips in it around the sink, we didn't go for a rounded edge and I have a lot of heavy cookware. (My cast iron French oven is what did it) but the countertop has a warranty from the place we bought it from. They sent out a guy to fill the chips and he did a great job... one of the fills I can't find, the other one I can find, but it takes me awhile to remember where it is. ;) It really hides repair work wonderfully. Hope that helps!
    ...See More
  • megs1030
    5 days ago

    I'm sorry this happened to you, but I have to say your counters are gorgeous... scratches, marks and all. I would try to embrace it, I've never seen anything like your stone.

  • live_wire_oak
    5 days ago

    Most stones sold commercially as granite are not granite. Schist, gabbro , sandstone, basalt, hornblendite, rhyolote, dolomite, limestone, jaspillite, gneiss, slate, marble, serpentine, travertine, monzonite, onyx.......and actual granite. All of those have different physical properties.


    All of those are sold at a stone yard as “granite”, the same way that Puffs are “Kleenex” and any hook

    and loop fastener is sold as “Velcro”. You won’t get very far in any legal proceeding insisting that your stone isn’t granite, when granite is a genericised term.

  • kellysn
    5 days ago

    Live_wire_oak there was a very clear conversation with the fabricator that we wanted Granite and not Marble as we would never put marble in our kitchen. Every other fabricator we have since consulted with this week felt this was dishonest and needs to be corrected and that is what we will ask for. Hopefully it will not get to the point of a legal proceeding.

  • karin_mt
    5 days ago

    Yes, gabbro is called granite but they are both igneous rocks made out of similar minerals and they have similar properties. It's well recognized throughout the entire industry that marble is an entirely different stone than granite. Have you ever heard Cararra marble called granite? No. That;s because there's very clear precedent that marble and granite are two different types of stone. This is an easy case to make, and because of that it seems unlikely that legal proceedings will become necessary. Hopefully!

  • Shannon_WI
    5 days ago
    last modified: 5 days ago

    kellysn - before going down this path, do some research on granites you might choose to replace it. Look online for granites in the colors you need. Then see if any of those granites match the beauty of what you have right now. Then picture those granites in your kitchen, decide if you are OK with how the replacement granite will look compared to what you have now. I am totally a “granite person”, but what you have is so fabulous, I don’t think you will match its degree of beauty with granites in those colors. So do some research on that, and then see if you still want to switch out.

  • kellysn
    5 days ago

    Thanks Shannon_WI. I would never keep these counters in our kitchen. When they look this bad so soon, I can’t imagine what they would look like when we eventually sell. Our priority is durability and the stone is not pleasing on the eye with all the etching and scratches.

  • rachann61
    5 days ago

    If your first priority is durability then go with man made quartz. There are great products on the market. They do not need to be sealed and have anti microbe properties. The gray marble you have now is a medium darkish tone so I am sure you could find something in the tonal range. There are some that look like concrete. My sister has that kind. It is 10 years old and looks as good as it did when it was installed. Houzz has great articles choosing what type of product.
    Not knowing what you spent on the original stone you may have to spend a little more money. Hopefully you and the company can get you the countertops you want and both parties will be satisfied

  • kellysn
    5 days ago

    Thank you Rachann61 for the recommendation. I just emailed the company asking for a refund and a pick up of the stone after removal so we will see how they respond. We had a horror story of an install so not comfortable with using this fabricator again based on what has happened. But we will look into the Quartz for it‘s durability!

  • back2work
    5 days ago
    last modified: 5 days ago

    @kellysn I responded early in this thread and saw that so many others were chiming in that I assumed your dilemma had probably been answered in full, but I just skimmed all the replies up until now and am surprised to see that no one seems to have mentioned Stoneguard countertop barrier. I do believe you deserve a full refund from the stone company, but I also think you have an out-of-this-world beautiful countertop that you'll never match again as far as its beauty. If there is any chance to save it, perhaps you could consider coating with Stoneguard. It isn't necessary to refinish the top before application [edit to add that in your case, Joseph Corlett advises that it should, see below], and Stoneguard is the only total sealant that completely stops etching and scratching. I'm surprised @Joseph Corlett, LLC didn't mention it earlier.

    Also, I am a little confused you've heard that re-polishing marble is such a dusty mess, because I hear of this being done often. Martha Stewart, according to another post at Houzz somewhere, has said that she brought in refinishers once yearly to smooth out the marble countertops in one of her kitchens. Now, if you were to totally change the finish of the top like taking it from a polished to a honed surface, that could be intense, and there is a blog post somewhere else on the internet by someone whose installers did this in her home without permission and caused a lot of damage. I think you can get a scratch removal and buffing of marble for about $300 USD depending on the size and the labor costs in your area. Hopefully someone will correct me if I'm wrong about that.

    Anyway, I do understand you never wanted to be tasked with a surface that ever needed refinishing and that you've been conned and deserve a total refund, but if Stoneguard would at all be a consideration to preserve the beauty of what you have, it might be worth investigating. I think you could get 10 years easily out of your surface with a Stoneguard investment. And in the meantime, you can pocket the full refund from the countertops minus the Stoneguard cost.

  • RedRyder
    5 days ago

    It’s worth trying what back2work suggested. However, it would be just as smart to shop for another stone. Yes, yours is fabulous and beautiful but you may fall in love with something else. If you show a photo of your kitchen, some of the pros might have other suggestions.
    And yes, you deserve a full refund. Start researching better fabricators in your area. These guys are awful.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    5 days ago

    Stoneguard comes in a matte finish, but those scratches will have to be removed, at least throughly disguised, before it is installed. That's a lot of work and that expense combined with the cost of the Stoneguard, you're pushing the edge of replacement cost.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    5 days ago

    are you sure it's leathered and not honed? Leathered is a textured sort of feel to it.


    in any case, you were mislead. It's not a granite, not w/those scratches. do you have a spare piece of it? Try this if you do

    granite will scratch/etch the glass. if it's marble, it will leave a powdery residue (glass is harder than marble)


    So what to do now? you can have all the scratches smoothed over by a Marble restorer. I've had it done in my shower for my marble floor. It's not that messy. it's messy, but not like it's going to affect your entire house messy.

    I would do that, and have it honed. (polished will show everything). Have them put on a super sealer like Tenax.

    It won't prevent scratches, but it will protect it from stains. After he refinished my marble floor, he applied that and buffed it. water just beads up on it.

  • kellysn
    5 days ago

    This is my response from the fabricator:



  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    5 days ago
    last modified: 5 days ago

    Wow,,,besides the fact that his grammar sucks, as well as his spelling, he is clearly not accepting the marble fact.

    Perhaps you should do the glass test and post pics of the result to prove that it's not granite.

    You might also list in there that regarding the timeline, it takes months of use in order to see the buildup of minor scratches, that should never occur on a piece of granite. And, you can list that granite is a 7 on the MOHS scales (Diamonds are a 10) , whereas marble is a 3. Hence, the scratches from something like ceramic or glass (5) dishes

  • back2work
    5 days ago

    @kellysn Send a demand letter by registered mail with signature confirmation of delivery. You will go to small claims court if they don't settle out of court based on your demand letter. You can do it yourself if you want to avoid lawyer's fees. Document everything that you possibly can. I think 2 years will be the statute of limitations on a claim like this in most jurisdictions. You should get a judgement against them and then be able to pursue collections. You'll win the case by default if they refuse to appear. Delete any reviews you've posted on social media about them and refrain from posting new ones so they cannot counter sue you for slander or libel which you'd have to defend in court even if your statements were true.

    Most collections agencies won't take a case under $5,000, so try to get a settlement above that if you can. The stone company is making it easy for you by standing by their claim of this being a granite. It would be just your word against theirs if they changed their tune and started saying they'd told you this was marble all along, so them saying still that it is granite actually works in your favor.

    @Joseph Corlett, LLC is right that refinishing cost plus Stoneguard is starting to verge on the cost of replacement. It's a wide market out there, though, so that would be low-end replacement cost, maybe around $25 to $30 USD per square foot installed. You won't get something that looks like what you have for that.

  • kellysn
    5 days ago

    Beth H I did the test- the stone does not scratch glass and leaves a powder

  • back2work
    5 days ago
    last modified: 5 days ago

    @kellysn I also want to add that removing a countertop isn't a risk-free prospect. Depending on how the installers attached the top, you could see some cabinetry damage. Hopefully they used just silicone and not a hard glue.

    I did a fair amount of research on Stoneguard when I was considering all different types of countertops for my current kitchen renovation, and the only drawback that I found was that it lowers the temperature at which you can place hot things on it. I cannot remember exactly, but seems like it is somewhere just under 400 degrees Fahrenheit that it will melt. Much of the information about it is actually on the company's Facebook page in addition to its home website. You'll need to be careful to use trivets for hot pots and pans, which you should be doing with any countertop surface anyway according to Natural Stone Institute recommendations for stone counters and also manufacturer's precautions regarding other materials like quartz, Corian, and laminate. I've seen nothing but positive reviews for Stoneguard. It is an actual plastic film that goes over your counter and makes it bulletproof. It's the only way I would have considered using a marble in my kitchen (I ended up choosing Beleza soapstone). There's nothing else like Stoneguard on the market of which I am aware. Liquid sealants don't compare. I believe Stoneguard is about $25 per square foot to install, but you'd need an individualized quote to be certain of that. Scratching and etching won't happen with Stoneguard in place.

    One last anecdote about re-coating vs. replacing: my brother is in the business of flipping homes, and he had a recent project where the bathtub actually could have been coated over or replaced. The coating would have been $400, and the replacement with all the extra issues he ran into ended up costing him $2,000. He said he won't think twice about re-coating next time if it is a possibility. In your situation, you aren't dealing with plumbing issues to replace a counter, but you are dealing with getting the existing surface off and a new one on without splintering the wood or chipping the finish of your cabinetry. Nevertheless, you need something that works for your family, so I hope you land on the best solution for your family even if it includes replacement and that you get your money back from the dishonest dealer as easily as possible.

  • karin_mt
    5 days ago

    UGH, it's really irksome that they totally dismissed you. That's not okay. I'll message you with some options.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    5 days ago
    last modified: 5 days ago

    I did the test- the stone does not scratch glass and leaves a powder

    Then you 100% have a marble countertop and not granite. This alone should be proof to him that it's marble. Granite will scratch glass. quartzite will scratch glass. marble and some limestone, slates, are the only others that are soft like that.

    Call and speak to the manager or better yet, go in there w/the glass and your countertop piece. Show him. If he debates you refer him to a geology book.

    Tell him you'll get letters of proof from qualified geologists that will tell you it's marble. Does he really want to go to court over that? Doesn't matter if it's been 8 months. youre the consumer. It's not your job to have the stone tested from a professional business that deals in stone. THEY should be the ones that know the difference. You specifically said you wanted granite because you have a busy family and needs something that stands up to it. They sold you this 'granite' and assured you it would. It's false and you've since discovered it's false. Give him a chance to replace it w/the granite of your choice, OR let them refund you exactly what you paid for everything.

  • karin_mt
    5 days ago

    YES. This. Exactly.


    Beautifully said, Beth!

  • barncatz
    5 days ago
    last modified: 5 days ago

    If you google Stormy Gray Granite - which is what your invoice from the company called this stone - you get "Stormy Gray Travertine" results. The photos match your counter.

    I know this advice will sound odd, but don't focus on the scratches. The stone company has a strong case that a customer can't demand replacement of 8 month old counters because they show wear from normal use. That is their second paragraph.

    YOU have a totally strong fraud case - they sold you something called granite that is not granite. Even if the stone wasn't scratching, they sold you one thing while claiming it was another thing and that is fraud. It doesn't matter why you wanted granite, so don't get sidetracked back to the wear argument. BUT YOU will have to show you can PROVE this slab is not granite. It was interesting to me that the company didn't say "this is granite". So, they probably know it's not and are playing games i,e. This is not marble. That may be true, but the point is that it's NOT GRANITE and they told you it was.

    They're also questioning the expertise of whoever you consulted. I'd get letters from whoever you consulted stating their experience. The company will back down when you show them you're serious and if this ended up in court, your "expert" witness would testify credibly that the Stormy Gray slab they sold you was not the granite they labeled it as.

    That invoice is so important, hang on to the original at all costs, but send them a copy along with letters stating it is not granite.


  • back2work
    5 days ago

    @barncatz I wish threats would work, but speaking from experience, sometimes only a lawsuit will for people who think you're just bluffing. We wish them all the best and hope it doesn't come to that. Documenting all efforts to resolve the issue out of court will work in their favor. Sometimes you can progress to legal mediation and avoid court. In the United States, small claims court cases are usually pretty easy to win if you have a solid case. Limit on claims varies from state to state. Where I live, it cannot be more than $10,000 USD. Getting the collection once you have the judgment is the hard part. The court leaves that up to you, and you have some authority to collect money out of their cash register and other avenues, but usually people will turn it over to a collections agency for a fee. The cheated customers here are not likely to get a full refund unless they sue for court costs and inconvenience as well, which the court may or may not grant.

  • barncatz
    5 days ago
    last modified: 5 days ago

    back2work, at this point, of course, none of us knows whether threats will work. Since the fraud here is actually rather obvious 1) granite does not scratch like that under normal household use, 2) the seller must know the stone was labeled incorrectly (if he's been in business more than a day) and 3) kellysn hopefully can find other stone sellers to provide the expert opinion she needs, I believe she has a better chance than usual to avoid litigation, even of the small claims court variety. Just my opinion of the facts here.

    I think it would be helpful if she could hire an attorney to write the demand letter and assemble the accompanying exhibits, but I believe if she proceeds calmly and along the lines I outlined, she may get her seller to refund her money and remove the counters. She does need to get advice on possible damage to her kitchen cabinets etc. from their removal before she proceeds.

  • RedRyder
    5 days ago

    There is also some consumer leverage with threats to blast the internet with their fraudulent behavior. Some companies rely heavily on their internet reputation. Let them know if they correct it, or better yet, give you a full refund so you can work with someone else, you will praise them to the hills. Litigation is a bad route. I won against a contractor, who then declared bankruptcy and then got the court to relieve him of ANY payment or liens. And it took nearly 3 years of my life. Try to avoid court as much as you can.

  • mama goose_gw zn6OH
    4 days ago

    Your stone is beautiful, and while it's not what you thought you were getting, and maybe not even what you paid for, I'd advise keeping it. Buy some Scotchbrite (or similar) scrubby pads and test the etched limed spot, and some scratches, on the sample piece. I have honed marble, and I've found several methods to smooth etches, but I knew what I was getting, and knew I could embrace the patina. You can search the Kitchens forum for 'etched marble' to find many threads.

  • live_wire_oak
    4 days ago
    last modified: 4 days ago

    All in all, the fabricator has a very valid point that you bought “granite”. He doesn’t know the difference in stones. It’s all granite to him. He doesn’t come from a system that knows or cares about the finer points of distinction.

    Again, granite is a generic term, as well as a technical geologic term. Lots of older people even call granite a type of marble, and use “marble” as the generic term. Just like all Southerners want to know what type of Coke you want to drink, Sprite or Dr Pepper.

    Most stone sold today as “granite“ are not geologically granite. Most. If you hang your hat on that, you will lose any court case. And most Stone today is sold without any geological descriptor at all, or even an accepted universal worldwide name. Stormy Monday nothing, at one yard may be Gray Ghost quartzite at another, and Blue Moon granite at another, and Fantasy Brown quartzite at another, and Fantasy Brown marble at another. There are zero regulations or rules about this, other than Buyer Beware. On the front end. Be picky and test then.

    Your bought a stone, and didn’t do due diligence on the front end. Which includes internet research, or consulting a geologist on your part. If geological class were that important to you, the research is incumbent upon you. Not the barely graduated high school guy operating a bridge saw who uses “granite” to label all stones that go under his saw. He only knows this one cuts easy, and that one will eat up blades, and that one cracks easy, and that one soaked up water when cut. That’s it.

    Even the distributor that they buy the stone for doesn’t really know. The buyer in the field down in Brazil? All he knows is this mine is controlled by that cartel, and that one’s a family concern, and that one had inadequate road access, even though they have pretty stone.

    You’re attempting to hold the fabricator to a higher standard than the industry holds itself to. However, you are allowed to be as picky as you want. On the front end.

  • kellysn
    4 days ago

    Live_wire_oak if a customer specifically asks a fabricator who is also the OWNER for granite and not marble, and is sold a stone labeled leathered granite,

    it better be leathered granite. If it is not, they will be held accountable. It is that simple. And on a side note, they wouldn’t let me test or bring a piece home because there were only 2 slabs.

  • live_wire_oak
    4 days ago

    You had the choice to move on to a different fabricator that would allow you to test. Or to hire a geologist to consult and verify. You didn’t.



  • tsjmjh
    4 days ago

    Oh, come on. The thousands and thousands of people that go to a stone yard and pick a slab that is labeled "leathered granite" are supposed to bring geologists along with them?

  • kellysn
    4 days ago

    And why would we assume the owner would mislabel and lie to us when he suppose to be the expert? How would we hire a geologist to test when he did not have a sample? There is something called accountability in this world and as a consumer, we should get what we pay for.

    Thanks for your input live_wire_oak. This is what attorneys are for

  • karin_mt
    4 days ago

    The industry certainly holds itself to a high enough standard to know the difference between granite and marble. In fact, the general standard within the industry is about a mile higher than that. I completely disagree with Live Wire Oak on this one. The stone was misrepresented, and not in a subtle way. It's the seller's job to know the difference.

  • RedRyder
    4 days ago

    Although there is always a Buyer-Beware message for anything, this is an egregious misrepresentation. Try to be pleasant, but firm, with the owner and see if you can get a refund.

  • Junk*Salvation
    4 days ago

    Your countertop looks exactly like the countertop I put in our guest bathroom. I found it as a remnant and it fit perfectly. I love it! But, it was sold to me as honed marble. Definitely not granite! I also had to have them seal it multiple times after install because it was still absorbing water. It is now sealed & not allowing moisture to be absorbed but I have no doubt I'll have to seal it more often than my other countertops. It was worth it to me though...so so pretty! But, I can understand your upset. You was sold a material that you thought was granite. I hope a resolution can be found but it sounds like it will be a battle. Best of luck to you!

  • M Miller
    3 days ago
    last modified: 3 days ago

    "You had the choice to move on to a different fabricator that would allow you to test. Or to hire a geologist to consult and verify. You didn’t."

    I need to point out for people reading this forum who are new to kitchen renovations, and who might think this is a Real Thing, that this is ludicrous. No one hires a geologist to assess their kitchen counters purchase. And (just for fun), I googled "geologist for hire". It's all about mining and well sites. Or, your home inspector may subcontract for a geologist if there is cause for concern about what your home's land is made of. I don't want anyone reading this thread and thinking, "I am looking at stone counters for my kitchen, and I need to line up a geologist to do it".

    The other problem is that it is conflating the stoneyard and the fabricator. It is the stoneyard that should have given the OP a small chip of this stone to test it. Separately, should the fabricator have said to the OP you have marble here? Only if the fabricator was aware she didn't know that. The fabricator scribes the counter, and goes to pick up the stone from the stoneyard to bring back to his shop to do his job of fabricating. He doesn't typically ask the stoneyard "does the customer know this is marble?"

    You should be able to test your stone. Sometimes the stoneyards just get the stone from their distributor labelled a certain way, and don't question it. They're the retailer that is in front of the customer and they manage the inventory and the sale, but not necessarily understanding the differences among stones (some do and some don't). On the other hand, a good fabricator is going to have to cut this stone, and must know what the stone is in order to fabricate it properly. But does that fabricator realize that the customer does not know what the stone is.

    The OP may have a case against the stoneyard for selling her something labelled granite that was not. Whether she has a case against the fabricator depends on whether she can prove that the fabricator knew she thought it was granite, and said nothing to correct that.

    I once bought a granite slab at a stoneyard that I was thrilled with. When the fabricator went to pick it up at the stoneyard, he declined it. He told me the slab I picked had several good-sized fissures, which would make it problematic to fabricate. But even if he was able to fabricate it, I would have problems down the road with those fissures in my counter. So I went back to the stoneyard and picked another slab. That is how a fabricator is supposed to be.

    Both the stoneyard and the fabricator failed this customer. But in different ways. Though I continue to say I think the OP's stone is beautiful, and I would keep it, but that is me.

  • vinmarks
    3 days ago

    So we know the stone is not granite but is it even leathered? It looks more like it is honed.

  • kellysn
    3 days ago

    M Miller, thank you for your insight... when we went into the store, I asked for granite specifically and not marble due to our high-activity kitchen. The sales woman (clearly family of the owner) and the owner said this slab was leathered granite. Our contract says ‘Stormy Gray- granite’, and the picture of the second slab they emailed me has a sign on it that says ‘Stormy Gray Leather Granite’. And more recently, since the owner keeps telling us this is our problem and normal wear and tear for leathered granite, we searched for a geologist. It is nearly impossible. I did get in touch with a local head geologist at a big university that has confirmed by email photos that this is not granite.

  • kellysn
    3 days ago

    vinmarks, no one believes it is leathered based on their responses. We are not sure what it is. It feels velvety smooth and is not totally flat, but no deep pockets or grooves.

  • tsjmjh
    3 days ago

    I have a leathered granite kitchen table top - 6' x 3' - it doesn't have deep pockets or fissures but it does have a definite "textured surface" and in no way is it velvety smooth. It has no scratches or visible wear, even in Absolute Black.

  • live_wire_oak
    3 days ago

    Millions live with matte marble because it’s far more forgiving than polished. A bit of a polishing up and an enhancing sealer work well for that.


    https://www.braxton-bragg.com/majestic-marble-polishing-compound-1-lb-majr04001.html


    https://www.braxton-bragg.com/tenax-ager.html


    And you did manage to find a geologist to consult with, the same way that I did. I contacted the local university and sent pics. That’s where I learned about sodalite, and how it’s care resembles that of marble more than granite. Avoid acid contact, and don’t drag things across the counter. Set them, and pick them up and place them. No dragging. If the occasional etch does occur, polish it out, and enhance it. All gone. Something that won’t happen with a damaged quartz or quartzite.

  • Kristin S
    3 days ago
    last modified: 3 days ago

    As you consider how to deal with this, keep in mind that the court of law and the court of public opinion paths are difficult to pursue simultaneously. A judge is generally not super impressed to find out you've been writing negative reviews on social media, should you end up in a small claims court, and a lawyer will likely tell you to stop commenting publicly about this.

    If you decide to go the legal route, there's often a lot of value in a letter from an attorney. It shows the other party that you're serious, you intend to follow through, and you've retained legal counsel for professional advice. At lot of people will cut their loses at that point rather than hire their own lawyer to escalate - being sued is expensive and stressful, even if you believe you're in the right, and the fabricator has to know he's not clearly in the right.

    If you decide to go the public opinion route, be very careful in your reviews to state only provable facts (i.e. "My invoice said granite, and the picture on the slab said leathered granite," accompanied by photos of those things, "Another fabricator and a geologist confirmed via photo that this was not granite") and opinions/feelings clearly expressed as such, "I feel misled.") Otherwise you run the risk of ending up in the court of law anyway, this time as a defendant. And keep in mind, too, that as I said above, even if you're in the right, getting sued is stressful and expensive.

  • kellysn
    3 days ago

    Another response from the owner with their company name covered. Of course the etching and scratches occurred after install. That is not the issue!

  • Kristin S
    3 days ago

    Perhaps email back and clearly let him know that you're concern isn't a warranty issue, it's an issue of him misrepresenting the product. You'd like to resolve it directly with him, as you're sure he didn't *mean* to misrepresent the stone he's selling, but if needed you will contact a lawyer for further advice on how best to proceed. Unless, of course, you won't, in which case don't make a threat.

  • RedRyder
    3 days ago

    Kristin is right. It’s a misrepresentation issue, but he is clearly latching onto the scratches. The scratches are the evidence of the misrepresentation, not the issue.

  • megs1030
    2 days ago

    My brother in law is a geologist. I have never once thought to take him to a stone yard to attest that the labeling on slabs was correct. The mere suggestion that this is where the OP went wrong is ridiculous. So sellers are no longer responsible when they knowingly sell products that are mislabeled? Also ridiculous.


    @kellysn, you've received a lot of great suggestions on here and I hope you are able to find a resolution that works in your favor. Again, I understand your countertops are not what you thought, but I do think they are stunning.

  • kellysn
    2 days ago

    Thank you all. We received a VM from the owner yesterday telling us that the Mohs scale, acidity test,

    etc is incorrect. We sent him another email and asked him to communicate with us going forward in email, and his response was that he will not communicate with us in writing and to call his store with any further questions


  • back2work
    2 days ago

    @kellysn Sounds like he is grasping to retain his credibility and has probably been through this before seeing how quickly he is refusing to leave a further email trail behind him. There is a brilliant thread here in the Houzz archives that desribes the steps one family took to win in small claims court without using a lawyer. I think this information is perfect for your situation and would really help you even if you don't decide to sue just yet but just to know you have options. Please refer to the thread here: Houzz Forum Archive - What to do when a project goes completely south

  • tsjmjh
    yesterday

    What state are you in? Only 12 states require 2-party consent to record phone calls. If you're not in one of those, you can record your phone conversations with him. Someone who says he/she won't correspond via email knows he/she is in deep doo.

  • kellysn
    yesterday

    Thank you tsjmjh and back2work-

    we are having a formal report done on the stone so there is no guessing. Once we have that hopefully he does the right thing. Clearly he knows what he did based on his responses. Hoping it does not happen to someone else.