bellegallica9a

Bermuda mystery rose, Carnation

bellegallica9a
last month
last modified: last month

Does anyone grow Carnation? It looks like a variation of Old Blush to me.


P.S. I have Carnation on order now. I like the cupped ruffly look I see in pictures, and it also looks like the tips of the petals are white or a lighter pink, but not sure if that's a trick of the light since in some pictures they look more evenly colored.

Comments (4)

  • malcolm_manners
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I imported 'Carnation' along with the other Bermuda Mystery Roses in 1988, and it is from our collection that those roses have become commercially available in the US. We've grown it ever since.

    Other than that it is pink and somewhat China-like, I don't really see a lot of resemblance to 'Old Blush'. I'd say it's a much more even, consistent pink, and never darkens to the reddish shades that OB will.


    bellegallica9a thanked malcolm_manners
  • Rosefolly
    last month

    Very pretty!

  • bellegallica9a
    Original Author
    last month

    Thank you, Malcolm. I didn't know all the Bermuda roses made it here through you.

    Like Rosefolly, I think it's really pretty and look forward to growing it. I'm glad it doesn't darken much in the sun since, in my climate, roses that do that turn to potpourri in a day.

  • malcolm_manners
    last month

    For the sake of accurate history I should clarify -- a group of us sent plants to the Huntington from Bermuda in 1987, while attending a regional meeting of the World Federation of Rose Societies, there. Many of them did not survive, and as far as I know, none of them ever entered commerce in the US from the Huntington (I could be mistaken about that). Then in 1988, my parents and I returned to Bermuda for a vacation, and I hand-carried budwood of the Mystery roses with me. They went through the 2-year Federal quarantine at Florida Southern College, and then we released them. Numerous nurseries acquired them from us. So I think it safe to say that the vast majority, if not all, of the Mystery roses in commerce in the US trace their lineage back to Florida Southern College's gardens.

    bellegallica9a thanked malcolm_manners