carabubble

New washer recommendations

carabubble
18 days ago

As I sit here with the noise of multiple fans, dehumidifiers, and a heater drying my house from a burst kitchen valve I am looking for a new washing machine online. Our washer has been making noises that suggest some part or other is wearing out. With the fun we’re going through right now, I think the sooner the better for a new washer.


So please give recommendations or “stay-aways”. My new machine must be a top loader because it’s in a laundry closet. I want one that CLEANS THE CLOTHES. “Duh?”, some folks might be thinking. But my current machine is an older HE model and it doesn’t do a good job. I hear and read a lot of the same complaints from others. I want my gardening clothes to come out clean!! Thank you for any suggestions.

Comments (209)

  • Marilyn_Sue
    10 days ago

    I used to love using my wringer washer. I have two laundry rooms, one up and one down. Both have Maytag top loaders. No problems and I have always left the lids open on them when not in use.

    Sue

  • abbisgram
    10 days ago

    @carabubble My mom has this one: https://www.lowes.com/pd/GE-4-2-cu-ft-Top-Load-Washer-White/1000757210. Had it over a year. She's happy with it. Fairly simple controls, agitator, decent price, should fit in your space. I'm still using a Kenmore that's about 23 years old. Made a few cheap repairs lately, been putting off buying a new one because I know it won't last as long. When I have to buy I'd consider this one.

  • holisticthug
    10 days ago

    @Elmer J Fudd Just saw your reply. On the topic of *naturally* soft water & food...having had the pastries from this place, yes, they are lighter & airier than Japanese pastries I’ve had elsewhere. Mouthfeel is on another level so the quality speaks for itself. Beer is not even a close comparison— we’re talking notable textural differences (kinda like my laundry!) while baking is a far more complex process than fermentation. And any number of cities would’ve had the Asian population to support the place so I’m quite sure the water was a factor. As an *unfiltered* surface water source, it uses snowmelt, rain, & (gasp) mist to produce some of the highest raw water quality in the country. So, it actually is unique in that respect. Here is a visual aid towards the bottom of the article posted earlier:


    Cheers 🍻


  • Elmer J Fudd
    9 days ago

    Sorry, I don't buy it.

    Have a nice day

  • desertsteph
    9 days ago

    If a person is short, a deep top loader may not be the best choice.

    one can use one of those 'grabber' gadgets or long kitchen tongs (like those for grilling). I'm short (5') and haven't had to use either yet. I've been able to reach things along the bottom if I lean in a bit.


  • Elizabeth
    9 days ago
    last modified: 9 days ago

    For laundry purposes, it does not matter in which way the water is softened including adding borax or STPP to the washload.

  • desertsteph
    9 days ago

    That's annoying to those of us who are sensitive to all these smells. (clothing, deodorants, hair products, perfumes -- sometimes I feel like I'm being bombarded with scents, from just one person!)

    I'm one of those in your 'us'. I have a hard time going down the detergent aisle at the store! I use AH sensitive detergent (a white container). Usually when my sister sends clothes to me I have to hang hem outside for several days (in the AZ sun) before I can bring them inside the house or my whole house will have that smell. she uses tide. I hang my clothes on a line - that is a smell I can tolerate and love to sniff! the fresh AZ desert air.

    my top loader (with agitator and water level options) is a Hotpoint.



  • desertsteph
    9 days ago

    For laundry purposes, it does not matter in which way the water is softened including adding borax or STPP to the washload.

    I started adding borax to the wash after reading it on mamapinky's laundry thread. I remembered that I used that when the kids were little and I also lived in the boonies and had well water.

  • Elizabeth
    9 days ago

    Missing Mamapinky.☹️


  • monicakm_gw
    9 days ago

    one can use one of those 'grabber' gadgets or long kitchen tongs

    I'm short and have been using a pair of kitchen tongs since I got my new washer in Oct of last year. Even with my older washers I had trouble reaching the bottom and would constantly aggravate my bad sciatica nerve by standing on my tiptoes to reach the bottom. Never thought of tongs till tiptoes didn't get me to the bottom of the washer :o Could have saved myself a lot of pain over the decades if I'd thought of tongs years ago!

  • monicakm_gw
    9 days ago

    I think I would just die (exaggerating a tiny bit) if I was sensitive or allergic to fragrance. It is such an important part of my life! Whether it's on me in various forms, in my home, laundry, car, husband (Tom Ford Oud Wood and Tobacco Vanille...OMGoodness!). I also appreciate walking past someone that smells nice :) There is always a Scentsy warmer or two warming a beautiful scent in the house. Bath and Body Works scented hand soaps are at every sink. Unstoppables (Shimmer and Spring) in the laundry room.

    Monica (who wishes she had known this Mamapinky)

  • Raye Smith
    9 days ago

    Monica, I too, am one of the approximately 20% of the population that has fragrance allergies. Do you ever think or wonder how many people have gotten sick from your use of perfumes? Would you stop wearing perfume if it made a family member of friend sick?

  • monicakm_gw
    9 days ago

    I won't stop wearing perfume because I might cross paths with someone sensitive to fragrance. That kind of logic could go on and on! Would I not wear it if I was going to be in close proximity to a family member or friend that I knew was sensitive? I would not wear it. My mother used to be sensitive to perfume so when I went to her house or we were in the car together, I'd not wear it. Now she has lost her sense of smell and taste :( so it's not a problem. I hate that she can no longer smell cake baking in the oven, flowers in her garden, our horses' breath and rain. And I can't imagine what it's like for her to not be able to taste her favorite Mexican food or my famous carrot cake. I don't work but if I did and was in an office situation and close to someone who let it be known she had allergies to perfume, I would refrain from wearing it. Other than that, I'm wearing my fragrances like so many other people do. Perfume industry is a BIG one.

  • desertsteph
    8 days ago

    I don't work but if I did and was in an office situation and close to someone who let it be known she had allergies to perfume, I would refrain from wearing it.

    a girl in the office where I worked had to be asked to stop wearing White Diamonds because it caused me breathing problems. the weird thing is that I wore WD for years prior to that. I don't know what happened with me but suddenly I couldn't be around it. the same with Windex, Lysol and many other cleaners - and other perfumes. I have a problem just walking by an aisle of scented candles and oils or detergents.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    8 days ago
    last modified: 8 days ago

    "Other than that, I'm wearing my fragrances like so many other people do. Perfume industry is a BIG one."

    Wearing strong scents is a waning practice and increasingly unwelcome in my area. Signs in public places, especially medical offices, caution that many practices that are inconsiderate to others are not permitted. "No cell phones, no eating, no strong scents" and of course No Smoking are often seen everywhere.


    There's nothing worse than sitting in a restaurant and someone sits nearby wearing too much perfume. I ALWAYS ask to be moved to a different table. The restaurant staff always does so with grace and agreement as to the need to do so.

  • Elizabeth
    8 days ago

    Isn't there an old joke that goes something like "nice perfume, must you marinate in it?". I have never worn more than a very small amount that DH can only smell when he is right next to me. I would never make the whole room smell. Luckily, I do not know anyone with a perfume sensitivity.

    But, yes, the detergent aisle in the store is overwhelming. It makes me sneeze.

  • ci_lantro
    8 days ago
    last modified: 8 days ago

    the weird thing is that I wore WD for years prior to that. I don't know what happened with me but suddenly I couldn't be around it.

    Desertsteph, there is a chance that it wasn't you. Scents get reformulated--they like to call it 'updated'. I used to wear & love Opium until YSL decided to update the fragrance. That marked the end of me wearing Opium (because I didn't like the new reincarnation.) Opium was about the only one that I ever wore so the change pretty much ended me wearing fragrances.

    And don’t get me started about Opium, which is a shadow of its former self after it was reformulated in 2009.

    https://myfabulousfragrance.com/perfume-reformulations-or-why-your-perfume-smells-different-than-it-used-to

  • monicakm_gw
    8 days ago

    Elmer Fudd, I never said I wore strong fragrances! What and how much I wear is always based on the environment/situation. OTOH, I'm complimented on my fragrances all the time. At a restaurant once, a female waitress came to the table to tell me that a male waiter LOVED my perfume and wanted to know what it was so he could get some for his girlfriend.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    8 days ago
    last modified: 8 days ago

    Do as you wish, of course, but I suspect practices and acceptance differs from place to place. I'm going to guess you don't live in my area.

    Where I am, fragrances and odors of all kinds that are discernible at what in normal times was the people distancing in public are MOST unwelcome. Just as is smoking anywhere other than at a great distance from others. There are sometimes signs about fragrances in elevators. Smoking is banned in or near many public parks, banned in proximity of a building open to the public. People who exude odors of either frangrances or smoking are unwelcome when near others.

    It's a reason why among other things, including the death and destruction, people are so upset with the smoke and haze from the fires of recent weeks. People are accustomed to sensing only the scents of fresh air, indoors and outdoors.

    As a comparison and for my curiosity, is smoking common in your area? Permitted outdoors in public places?

  • monicakm_gw
    8 days ago

    EF...Wow.

  • Raye Smith
    8 days ago

    Most people won't tell you they are allergic to your perfume, they will suffer in silence!


    Perfume strength or amount (users usually can't tell how much they're wearing) has nothing to do with reaction. It doesn't matter how many blooms are on a plant, if you're allergic to the blooms one flower is just as bad as a dozen. My favorite smell is hot cotton fresh out of the dryer, all natural.

  • monicakm_gw
    7 days ago

    So I am to give up on my perfume when leaving the house (I can wear it in my own home, right?) just in case I happen across someone that is going to have an allergic reaction to it? FYI, I live, shop and eat in NE Texas (that includes Dallas and Tyler and areas in-between). You might want to steer clear of the area. My favorite smell is horse.

  • Raye Smith
    7 days ago

    Sounds like a great idea to quit wearing perfume, you may even find that you feel better too.

  • monicakm_gw
    7 days ago

    Why is it a great idea for ME to stop wearing perfume? And what makes you think I would feel better if I didn't wear it? I didn't know I didn't feel good :o Thanks for your concern but I'm good!

    But you go right ahead and...not smell good :) Won't bother me one bit.


    https://www.elle.com/beauty/news/a36670/why-your-fragrance-can-make-you-more-confident/


    https://perfumes.com.ph/blogs/news/10-great-benefits-of-using-perfume


    https://www.quora.com/Why-does-the-smell-of-certain-perfumes-make-us-feel-good


    https://www.stylecraze.com/articles/benefits-of-using-perfumes/


    https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/2020/06/9846920/wearing-perfume-at-home-quarantine-psychology

  • Elmer J Fudd
    7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    If anyone needs proof that doing internet searches will produce results and lead to sites many users don't know how to deal with or how to choose the non-authoritative from the authoritative, the preceding does so.
    I especially like the one from the Third World country. It's known to be a source of respected advice for people in industrialized countries. Oh wait, no it's not. Notice that one?

  • holisticthug
    7 days ago

    Fudd you’re showing signs of sociopathy.


    The effects of scent on the limbic system & emotions are well-established. Powerful stuff, right up there w/ music. I would assume members of a laundry forum would get that w/o needing sources.


    It is a bit extreme to suggest she should quit wearing perfume. Besides being a personal decision that isn’t affecting anyone here...factors to consider: is it oil-based (minor sillage), synthetic, when/how was it applied? Irritants are everywhere...cleaning products & air fresheners are much bigger issues. For those w/ fragrance sensitivities the home or workplace is going to be the main source of exposure.

  • dallasannie
    7 days ago

    Since we are now discussing perfumed smells, I will register my own dislike or intolerance of perfumed people and houses. I am not allergic, it just is so unpleasant to have to breath in someones' perfume.

    So many have such a myriad number of different chemical scents all creating a miasmic vapor around them and everything that they interacted with. It is my option that laundry products are among the worst offenders. They perfume everything that you wear or use, your house, you car and your neighbors space as they blow out the dryer vent. Many people walk out of their house having encountered perfume in their bath soap, shampoo, dishwashing soap, bath towels, underwear, hair products, cleaning agents, clothing and then they add an extra layer of perfume to their bodies. So many vapors all mingling together and some people have such a strong scent to them that you can smell that they have been in the room even after they have left.

    I really cannot ignore that smell. It lingers like a bad odor. Not allergic but I don't want to spend time in a closed area with anyones perfume. I don't care how much it cost. I don't want to smell it.

    Fabric softener is about the worst of them all.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    7 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    "The effects of scent on the limbic system & emotions are well-established. Powerful stuff, right up there w/ music."

    You've demonstrated the same affliction, my friend, mistakenly and repeatedly thinking that hits from a Google word search match conveys knowledge and understanding that are relevant.

    People increasingly find personal scents, which are more often overwhelming than not, to be noxious and unpleasant and so are unwelcome. Do a Google search to learn more.

  • Raye Smith
    6 days ago

    Here's a good source to educate yourself on the (often damaging) contents of perfumes:

    http://thinkbeforeyoustink.com/home.php

  • SEA SEA
    6 days ago

    When we know better, we do better. I'll just put this right here:

    "Proximity to fragranced person: 23.6 % reported health problems from being near someone who is wearing a fragranced product (10.4 % respiratory problems, 8.6 % mucosal symptoms, 8.5 % migraine headaches, 3.9 % asthma attacks, 3.6 % neurological problems, 3.4 % skin problems, and others). This compares to previous studies (Caress and Steinemann 2009) that found 31.1 and 29.9 % of the population in (2002–2003 and 2005–2006, respectively) reported headaches, breathing difficulties, or other health problems when next to someone wearing a scented product."

    Info on fragrances

  • holisticthug
    6 days ago

    Fudd I’ve been studying & benefiting from aromatherapy for 20+ years, these concepts aren’t new to me. Many perfumes have natural compounds w/ some degree of therapeutic value. It’s the synthetics that usually set off reactions- VOC’s, phthalates & other undisclosed potential toxics. Isopropyl alcohol is a carrier (also considered toxic) & is in the hand sanitizers everyone is using.


    The dept store type perfumes tend to be stronger/higher throw bc of synthetic content, but still plenty of unoffensive options. I usually go w/ niche brands & naturals that have a higher % of raw materials & dissipate quickly. Sephora has an entire section of “clean” perfumes now & the space is quickly gaining in popularity.


    It‘s one thing to educate, but some of these posts come off as policing. It’s very much dependent on context & the type/number of products used but I do agree that laundry products may be the worst offenders. If you have chemical sensitivities like I do, the first line of defense is the home, then workplace, since most significant health effects are cumulative. Of course as a wearer it’s good to be ingredient conscious & refrain from layering products if using public transit or sharing an enclosed space.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    Do a Google search for "aromatherapy and no medical evidence" and see what you find. When I did, the first search result listed was a Scientific American article from 6 months ago. Take a look at that.

  • elbits
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    OMG, I come here to read about washing machines and now its about 'aromatherapy' and perfume. Save this for another forum. Maybe Ulta or Sephora.

  • holisticthug
    6 days ago

    You just type in “aromatherapy” or “fragrance“ on pubmed. 1500+ results & even the first page has studies w/ positive results. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=Aromatherapy Essential oils are widely used for anxiety, nausea, & during labor. It’s basic biology, the olfactory receptors in the nose are linked directly to the brain & limbic system that’s why scent has a such a powerful effect on emotions & memory. Odor molecules can influence hormones, heart rate, even blood pressure.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/26482850_Physiological_effects_in_aromatherapy

    There’s just literally no argument, countless medical professionals use them in their practices. I have a book on EO’s written by a surgeon who has used them w/ great success for years.


  • holisticthug
    6 days ago

    Demanding sources that are never good enough just shows a lack of intellectual curiosity. It doesn’t make you seem smarter than everyone else. Misled—by researchers, doctors? Pubmed is a search engine, the literature is there but you clearly have no interest in reading it, questioning your own beliefs or even engaging in good faith. In other words, you’re trolling. I would appreciate it if you don’t show up on any of my posts in the future.👌

  • Elmer J Fudd
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    Nice try. Did you look at the Scientific American article, it's clear as could be. Not a credible source after 175 years of objective science reporting?

    Bye.

  • monicakm_gw
    6 days ago

    How 'bout them Cowboys?!

  • holisticthug
    6 days ago

    All that lazy article said is EO’s haven’t been found to “cure illness” & results are inconclusive...which applies to nearly everything. The link to the NIH summary didn’t even work. It mentions lemon balm as helping dementia, others for hair loss but there are many other studies she could’ve cited. There are no clinical trials bc Big Pharma doesn't stand to make $. The question of whether EO’s work is up the practitioner & user to find out. I know one veterinarian who relies heavily on them in her practice, esp for animals deemed hopeless cases. She has before & after pics of tumors that shrank from topical application. My mother drastically lowered her blood pressure once she found the right blend. Don‘t knock it til you try it.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    6 days ago

    I guess the article wasn't clear enough for you.

  • holisticthug
    6 days ago

    No need for click-bait when you can do searches on pubmed or experiment yourself. Here is a much more thorough & better written article in SA: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/do-scents-affect-peoples/

    If the original article was so damning you would‘ve linked it already. For a troll you are pretty careful about modifying replies. But if I were you I’d refrain from any condescension & harassment from here on out. 👹 Byee.

  • Raye Smith
    6 days ago

    Well there is a link between poor performing heavily perfumed detergent and washing machines. Buy better quality detergent and get better results and clothes that don't stink of perfume. I also never use fabric softeners, rinse properly and they are unnecessary. Only chemicals that go in my washer are detergent, borax for very dirty clothes, clorox for bleaching and ammonia for oils.

  • Elizabeth
    6 days ago

    I get good results with Tide free and clear. Tide powder is a great cleaner as is Persil. I always double rinse. I have Borax in the laundry room but prefer STPP.

    I keep coming back here to see what machine the OP bought.

  • Raye Smith
    6 days ago

    armjim - Why?

  • armjim
    5 days ago

    Raye, when posts begin to devolve into name calling and insults, they have no place in a normal thread. Particularly in a forum which is primarily about using washing machines and dryers.

  • ci_lantro
    5 days ago



  • Elmer J Fudd
    5 days ago

    What's wrong with a little tumble here and there? It's what happens to clothes in dryers and front loader washers.

  • Raye Smith
    5 days ago

    armjim I skip Elmer's posts so I haven't seen any name calling or insults.

  • SEA SEA
    5 days ago

    omg. Stop it Elmer. Take a chill pill.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    5 days ago

    It's a beautiful warm and sunny day, the fire haze is getting better day by day and with but a few exceptions, all is well in the world. I hope everyone else has a good day too. Remember to always tell the truth!