0
Your shopping cart is empty.

Porch Swings

Cuddling up with a cozy blanket or loved one on a porch swing and watching the sun set in your front yard can be the epitome of a relaxing moment. To create an intimate space with a patio swing, take a peek at the following information to decide what style and material is best for you.

What types of porch swings are there?


Your first choice will be to decide what type of patio swing you’d like to see yourself curling up in. The following are some of the most common styles you can choose from:
• Chair: If your porch or patio is small or if you prefer to have a seat all to yourself, a single-seater porch swing is a great choice.
• Bench: A bench swing can typically sit 2 to 3 people, making it great for a family snuggle or conversation with a friend.
• Bed: A porch swing bed can make a wonderful place to sit or nap. A bit sturdier than a hammock, a porch swing bed can still sway gently back and forth as you catch some shut-eye.
• Hanging: Hanging porch swings are suspended from the eaves of your porch by ropes or chains. If you choose a hanging patio swing, be sure you have at least 2 ½ feet of clearance on every side.
• Freestanding: If you lack eaves or rafters to suspend a hanging patio swing from, a freestanding model will do the trick. These come supported by an A-frame and can be placed in many more locations than their hanging counterparts.

What materials are best for my porch swing?


Your porch swing can come in a variety of materials, each of which has its own strengths and weaknesses. These include:
• Aluminum: This is a lightweight option that offers a wide range of color choices. They offer high durability, as well.
• Resin: This is a plastic-like material that can be molded into different shapes and textures, including wood grain and wicker. They tend to be your least expensive option.
• Wicker: Always a classic choice, wicker is a great choice for warm climates thanks to its open weave. This allows air to circulate around your body as you rock back and forth.
• Wood: Highly durable woods like redwood, cedar and teak are optimal choices if your porch swing might be exposed to the elements. Cheaper choices like fir and pine can also work. Wood is yet another classic choice that offers great durability, but you’ll need to do regular maintenance to preserve its color.
Sponsored Products
Sell on Houzz - Learn More

Need help with an existing Houzz order? Call 1-800-368-4268 (Mon-Sun).