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rudy65

Is Vermont Danby Marble REALLY more durable than the "regular" marbles

rudy65
6 years ago
I'm at a huge crossroads with picking an island kitchen countertop material (sink is in the island). I absolutely LOVE a slab of Monteclair Danby Marble!! I've heard online and through other sources that it is more durable than regular marble, but my supplier and fabricator both just say "marble's marble" !! I have a family of slobs who regularly make blueberry smoothies and leave blobs of it to dry on my current granite, which is tough as nails and able to handle the torture. What do you think and know?!?!

Comments (78)

  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    So, polyester resin is not plastic now? Alternative fact? I suppose it doesn't diminish the depth and clarity of the stone either like the in person piece that I viewed that might as well have been Formica 180FX.

  • PRO
    Betsy Suposs
    4 years ago
    I installed vermont danby in my kitchen last summer. It truly is beautiful and was well sealed. It doesn't stain, even wine, blueberries,e tc. Wipe up fine. BUT...it does etch, from citrus, things like that. When its cleaned up it is still beautiful and the etching is only seen when light hits it and you look at it at a precise moment; most people don't notice at all. I love it and happy. If you want perfection it's not for you. Get quartz.
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    More months have gone by since my last comment. No new etched. A few small scratches but nothing else. I wanted to update to add...I left an oozing bottle of grape seed oil on the counter and it was all over the counter. Left a dark mark. I washed it with mild dish soap and there is zero sign it ever happened. I have a watermelon colored kitchen aid mixer and one night after making something, I tipped the whole unit back and slid it across the countertop...left a huge pink paint mark that didn’t wash off. I got out the baking soda, wet a paper towel and in less than 2 mins it was completely gone. I’ve gotten so much stuff on this marble and I have yet to find a single thing that hasn’t come off with a little baking soda or dish soap. We’ve had it for a year now, used it super hard...I’ve even rolled out buttery dough several times directly ON MY ISLAND...and it’s still gorgeous. The same people who “can’t tell” that quartz isn’t marble probably wouldn’t notice any of the tiny imperfections that have happened because they’re less obvious to the eye than the fakeness of quartz pretending to be actual marble. Just sayin. (I’m not anti-quartz, just anti-“stone imposter” quartz. If I wanted a solid color counter, I’d totally get quartz.)
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  • Ken Cochran
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    Sophie, the catalyzed polyester resinous coating I mentioned , Clearstone, Is not plastic. It is a 100% solids blends of polyester and styrene which also contains several performance additives, UV inhibitors, impact modifiers , flow agents as well as fluorocarbon waxes added to increase scratch resistance among other properties. It is water clear so one does not lose the look of the natural stone. Btw. Polyester can. Be chemically and physically altered to make a fiber or plastic sheet, etc but neither is a resin except during certain stages of manufacture, neither type in their final form. Hope that helps . If you have any other questions , feel free to email me.

  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler
    4 years ago

    Magically mixing two different plastics into labeled notplastic just because you don't like the label attempts obfuscation.

  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC
    4 years ago

    LPD, to answer your question of why not sand out all the etches in marble, I say because there are better things to do with one's time than be a slave to your countertop. This is where the "I can't take the upkeep" comments about marble come from. It's not necessary. I'll repeat what I said before, clean the countertops and be done with it.

  • L P. D.
    4 years ago
    Sure I get it but my point was if you are cleaning anyway you might as well clean it right with just an extra ounce of effort. I will say this now that I know etches can be "fixed" I find I've been leaving them knowing I can save that extra effort for another time. Also etches seem to fade a bit over time or I stop noticing as much.
  • holly98
    4 years ago

    So what happens if you don't seal marble? Danby or other types.

  • Sabrina Angeli
    3 years ago

    Wow, "fluorocarbon waxes" sounds suspiciously like teflon. We should, as a species, be moving away from using things that are so environmentally persistent. This is the same family of chemicals that is now concentrated in human breast milk. Just because they manufacture stuff with it, and it does not break down in the environment, and it bioaccumulates. Too much info to put into a comment here, but seriously--this stuff sounds like bad news. I think if you want marble, you had better accept that it's limestone (calcium carbonate) and as such will always react with acids and end up getting etched.

  • lwieman
    3 years ago

    so what is the decision? Is Vermont marble better?


  • taraleigh77
    3 years ago
    Any opinions on the best white paint for cabinets that goes beautifully with Danby Calacatta?
  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC
    3 years ago

    lwieman, the Vermont marble is less prone to staining, but will still etch. "Better" is subjective and only you can make the decision as to whether you want to live with it.

    taraleigh77, the "best" white paint is the one that you choose in your home with your marble. Get large samples and see what works with the lighting you are going to use. Color is very fickle and no one can guess what is going to work in your space without seeing it in person.

  • kraulin
    3 years ago
    Can the etching on polished Danby Marble Be corrected?
  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC
    3 years ago

    Maybe, but it will continue to occur so it's not worth trying to make the marble do something that it doesn't want to do!

  • rainshivers
    3 years ago

    Hi, can someone give me their opinion on Imperial Dandy? Seen at a local stone yard. It’s the closest to what I’m looking for in a marble countertop.

  • elissahope10
    3 years ago

    It's GORGEOUS!

  • rainshivers
    3 years ago

    I agree! But they gave me this one because it was Honed and then it was left out in the rain and this is what it looked like yesterday.

  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC
    3 years ago

    Rainshivers, everything that has been said in this discussion applies to Imperial Danby as well as Olympian, Montclair, Mountain White, Royal, etc. They all are quarried at the same mountain, and have the same properties. Your stoneyard leaving it out in the rain just shows what can and will happen in your kitchen--it will become etched from every kind of liquid, even water.

    So if you read all the posts in this discussion and decide you can live with Danby with all its pluses and minuses, then go for it. If you can't, then get something else. Just make sure you make an informed decision.

  • jayswiftbedrock
    3 years ago

    Diana , has some of the most sound advise on here, like she knows marble. Let me flesh out her thoughts. Marble has been used for 10,000 years as counter tops. The way I recommend it be used, is as it has always been used before chemicals took over our lives. When you apply olive oil to a honed marble, any stone for that matter, it will soak in. After a few applications it will become saturated. Yes, it will darken it slightly. It will not stain at that point because there is no where for the staining material to soak in. Red wine left in a puddle for days, no stain. Why olive oil you ask? Would you ever drink one of those sealers? And it works and you already own it, and once the stone is saturated you never to apply it again. Sounds too easy, right? No one can make money off you selling chemicals, thus all the advertising.

    Second point, no polished marble except for furniture. It is too soft and etches. As for the comment about not noticing the etching after a while, that is because you are honing it with every day use. You abrade it smooth even just with your hands. Think of how the arms of a wooden chair almost look polished from wear. If you ever polished your nails, it is the difference between the course side rub (etched) and the fine side rub ( fine hone ).

    As for "quartz" , it is finely ground sand ( sand is quartz ) with differing types of polymer binders. That is why it is non absorbent. That fact makes it hard to polish with out leaving marks from the polishing equipment. That make it unrepairable in the field. It requires lots of water so it will not burn. Hot pots burn it. That is not true for any natural stone. Also the man made colors are no color fast. Not so with natural stone. And lastly, ALL materials will wear, thousands of micro scratches. Kitchens take a beating. Natural stone wear beautifully, man made materials do not. Plastics look really tired when they wear.

    That is my prejudice about natural materials vs man made materials, but I have only been working stone for forty years and have seen so many manufactured materials come and go off the market. Plus nothing is a beautiful as honed marble.

  • L P. D.
    3 years ago
    Rainshivers my stone had these marks too. I didn't notice until after it was installed! However the place I purchased the stone from came and polished it out (when they came to fix the scratch). Don't worry any reputable stone yard that "knows marble" will be able to handle it. If you would like the name of the company I used to at least call and get some advice let me know.
  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Yes, they definitely will come and repair the scratches, chips and marks. However, they cannot prevent them from happening again. It's the nature of the stone.

    Jayswiftbedrock, you definitely know stone after 40 years!

  • Lucinda Widmark
    3 years ago

    Yes, so true!! I have had my Vermont Danby a year plus now, and it has definitely been a challenge. I do have etchings from orange juice, beer bottle bottoms, whatever is left here and there. I love the look, but I now know, true it is the nature of the stone, as Diana declared above. I try to enjoy it, keep it wiped down, and know it will not be a perfect surface!! Would I choose to have it installed again in my kitchen with 11 grandchildren and family making food and Thanksgivings here...... absolutely not. A harder, more durable surface would be my next choice, and a beautiful granite for sure. It has been a live and experience and learned decision! I have a honed finish, and wonder how polished finishes survive wear and tear of a functioning kitchen, where people truly cook and eat and make messes and clean up..... over and over. I have a friend who put similar marble in her master bathroom, and it still is near perfect. I would install a beautiful marble in a master bath, but not in my future kitchen. Best wishes to everyone!!



  • rainshivers
    3 years ago

    My Danby as it was getting installed. The slabs I picked actually got dry and the water marks disappeared!

  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC
    3 years ago

    Lucinda, I have polished Calacatta in my master bathroom, and it is nowhere near perfect. It has the same qualities in a bathroom as in a kitchen, and the same drawbacks. Also the same beauty!

  • Rita / Bring Back Sophie 4 Real
    3 years ago

    Sophie, are you saying all sealers make marble feel and look plasticky? Or are there some sealers that just provide some protection without turning the marble into a giant sheet of laminate? I am fine with etching, but not staining.

    Diana, what is your Danby sealed with and are you happy with it?

  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    The installer sealed them with a product from Italy, I'm sorry I don't know the name of it. I haven't sealed it again for almost 4 years. It does not look or feel plastic-y. There is a product called Clearstone that is touted a lot, and I've heard that is a plastic coating, which may be what Sophie is referring to.

    Just a note--my husband disagrees with me. He hates the etching and would like to have used a different product. If it weren't so expensive, he would replace the marble with something less precious (!)

  • PRO
    Clearstone Coating, Inc.
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Just poking my nose in here... Clearstone Coating has been around for 20 years in Australia and we've been present in the US for the last 5-6 years. Our head office is in Las Vegas - with Certified Clearstone Applicators throughout the US. We have a 10-year manufacturer's warranty against acid etching and staining. Clearstone is a permanent solution to natural stone protection.

    Clearstone has been applied at the Beverly Hills Hotel, Langham 5th Avenue, Loews Regency NYC, Hotel Bel-Air and the Waldorf Astoria Beverly Hills to name just a few locations.

    Clearstone looks like the natural stone on which it is applied, and the only way to tell it is there is that Clearstone is a tad warmer to the touch than natural stone.

    We're here to answer questions. Feel free to contact us on (702) 427 7977 and visit our website at www.clearstoneus.com.

    Cheers,

    Shari

  • PRO
    MarbleSeal Technologies
    3 years ago

    Thanks Shari.

  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC
    3 years ago

    Thanks for the clarification, Shari.

  • PRO
    Clearstone Coating, Inc.
    3 years ago

    Your are most welcome.

  • Amy V
    last year
    last modified: last year

    We love out Danby Olympian White! Our tile installers wrote on our counter top with black permanent marker in two areas. Needless to say, we were not pleased with the tile guys, but definitely pleased with our Danby! We made a paste with Comet and both spots came right out! If you go to the Danby website, there is a link on how to care for the stone. We followed their reference guide to get the permanent marker out . Our Danby is honed and sealed, which I believe helped as well.

  • retirewalnut
    11 months ago

    I have had mine for 3 years around my farmhouse sink and cooktop. We are seniors and I cook a lot, especially during this Covid virus. Any marble will etch from lemons, chip at the edges if a pot hits or a mug falls from your hand, and various marks from who knows what.... . I knew this going in and thought of all the old marble in vintage ice cream parlors still around and though imperfect still look great and comforting. I still love it with all it's imperfections but I cannot imagine having had it with my kids growing up. I have a leather look finish on granite island which goes well with my Joanna Gaines inspired kitchen and the white marble. I have quartz in my Florida condo kitchen. Both hold up much better than the marble around my sink and cooktop but I wouldn't trade it for anything. If you are fussy, and like perfection, forget marble. I have come to realize life is filled with imperfections.

  • kshem
    11 months ago

    Add one more vote in favor for Danby/Marble in the kitchen. after using this site to help with our decision i feel like giving back what i learned so others can make their call easier.

    Attached a pic of the island. In our previous home we had Caesarstone -- blizzard -- really pretty indestructible. but actually always looked dirty because it was monotone. The variation in the Danby looks cool all the time. Even if it isn't the cleanest.


    Anyway we went for it since we something more interesting For the new kitchen. Did The counter, island and backsplash w/ 3cm matching slabs. "Olympic" i think -- though i think these are all just names to describe what pattern / color it has.


    We love it. It feels good to the touch. Looks cool. Very happy.


    But to acknowledge why everyone is probably scouring these comments -- it's true Marble is not without a few worries -- i could be sold either way. Anyway -- if you go for Danby, the following tips are what i would share:


    1. It does chip easier than Caesarstone at least -- example dropping a cast iron skillet on the corners will chipit. I would go for as much of a beveled / rounded corner you can stand (we preferred a sharp corner but that has chiped a couple of places. After a few more chips I'll probably have someone bevel the corners a bit To remove the chips.


    2. seal it right away. we used 511 Porous Plus. I did it myself after we moved in -- even though they said they sealed it -- mainly because i wasn't sure what kind of a job the stone guys did. Since we have sealed it we have had zero stains. Meat juice, olive oil, red wine, marker, crayon, tomato sauce, etc -- it's good to go.


    3. If oil gets in there (most likely before you can seal it) -- just use a poltice -- Stonetech makes one -- really works great actually. It has some solvent that breaks down the oil and as it dries it draws it out. It takes about 3 days to put it on there, let it dry, and then clean up. Magic.


    4. Etching -- this is the biggest difference from Caesarstone in my mind. Lots of things etch it. quickly and easily. It reacts quickly to anything acid. You could just roll with it -- but even with a Honed surface it shows depending on your light source And the angle that you are looking at the slab.


    5. Honed, definitely versus polished -- not so much because it hides the etching if it is honed -- which maybe it does a little. But more so because i think it would be easier to keep it honed. I don't know how you would re-polish it to shiny on your own. You'd have to hire someone i think. You may want to talk to your contractor about what their definition of "Honed" is -- they can let you decide and there are various degrees to separate Honed from Polished


    6. Last comment-- if you buy honed, then it is EASY to remove the etching -- if you are so inclined. after about a year i tried something. I took one of those green ScotchBrite pads, with a plastic handle behind it (for some leverage) and i used the Weider brand Glass cooktop polish we have for our cooktop --spread it around and i scrubbed the whole top surface. After 20 mins w/ medium force. every last etch was GONE. after cleaning up the cream/marble powder residue and washing the surface really well -- after letting it dry well -- you will need to (or probably should) re seal it. It looks better than new -- with a very uniform matte finish. Takes time but it is shockingly easy. just knowing you can do that every couple of years to refresh it is great.


    maybe someone thinks this is a bad move -- but it worked for our slabs.


  • Barbara C
    10 months ago

    Kshem- we are having Danby marble installed in our kitchen in a few weeks and I really appreciated the tips you shared. You indicated you sealed your stone with 511 Porous Plus and I was wondering if you considered using something like More Surface Care. Our fabricator is recommending this but I’m concerned it will make the stone look “plasticky”. It seems like a physical surface coating applied to the stone that creates a barrier.


    (Maybe I should start a new post- I‘ve seen people criticized for continuing old posts, but first I looked at existing posts and your comments were so appropriate- and recent!)



  • rainshivers
    10 months ago

    2 year update :


    I LOVE our Honed Danby marble kitchen countertops and would get them all over again. I did not seal them and have had zero issues. Now more than ever with Covid, I have been cooking daily and have had no problems. Often, I put a dishtowel next to my cooktop to avoid splatters, and I make sure to wipe them down after food prep.


  • ehwilli20
    2 months ago

    @Barbara C @rainshivers I'm considering Danby marble for my kitchen. I have five children. :) Does this seem unreasonable? Quartz is not an option for me so my only options are granite, marble, or a quartzite. I'm just wondering if you are still loving yours!

  • Amy V
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    @ehwilli20, we have honed danby and are happy with our purchase. 1 year in, it has chipped by the sink. It does etch, but as long as you don't mind putting in the work, you can remove the etching with comet and then reseal on your own. It does make for a beautiful countertop and a practical marble. That being said, quartzite and granite are probably more sensible options, but hard to find one with the beauty of danby in my opinion.

  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC
    2 months ago

    With 5 children, ehwilli20 probably doesn't need more work! Trying to take etches out of marble is not worth the effort in my opinion. It's only going to start etching again. If you feel the need to remove etches, don't get marble.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    2 months ago

    Chipping at sinks is usually an edge profile detail problem, not a material problem. Round sink edges over 3/8" at least, I don't care what your designer or fabricator say please.

  • rainshivers
    2 months ago

    @ehwilli20 i have two kids. I absolutely love my marble. That said, my kids know now to to pour orange juice on the counter, they do it on the table, etc. I would only get the marble if you’re comfortable with the idea that you WILL get some etching regardless of how careful you are.


    Funny thing though, 2 years ago visiting friends were making mojitos in my kitchen and cutting the lime directly on the counter top before I noticed them doing it. I freaked when I saw it. Fast forward to today, those marks are gone and I didn’t even do anything to try and remove them.

  • Mary Elizabeth
    2 months ago

    @Joseph Corlett, LLC, what outside edge profile works best with 2 cm marble and a full undermount sink, (no apron front)?

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    2 months ago

    You can get any edge you please, just remember that the more rounded it is, the less likely it is to chip. And if you get one of those gawdawful negative reveal undermount sinks, make sure the bottom exposed edge is rounded as well.

  • Barbara C
    2 months ago

    @ehwilli20 I love mine even more than when it was initially installed! It is incredibly beautiful and feels amazing; in my opinion, nothing else compares. And the colors coordinate perfectly with everything else in our house. However, as noted, it does etch. And ours is honed, so the etches are less noticeable than they would be on polished marble. No staining at all, and we have minimized the etching after realizing the biggest culprits- lemon and lime juice. But there are only two of us. With five children, I think you really need to be certain the etching won’t bother you. You mentioned you are only considering granite, marble and quartzite. I think quartzite is also know to etch, although maybe not all types (Fantasy Brown was recommended, but it just didn’t work for me). Granite is definitely more practical, so if you can find a slab as pretty as marble (I looked extensively without success), it may be a wiser choice.

  • ehwilli20
    2 months ago

    @Barbara C I have looked and looked...nothing looks like marble...except marble!!! Etching won't bother me...even chips I can handle but staining is what worries me the most. A discoloration in an odd color is what would bother me on a daily basis. Do you mind sharing how you maintain the seal? What product you use??


  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    @ehwilli20, in my experience NOTHING will stain Danby marble. Stains as you describe "a discoloration in an odd color" will not occur. Etching, yes, but stains no. I've spilled tomatoes, red wine, dark berries, coffee, tea, flower pollen, and nothing stains it. Even though I sealed it once in 2014, and never again, I have NO STAINS. If that is your major concern, no worries.

    Danby is extremely nonporous, better than some white granites, so I wouldn't hesitate to get it if you're concerned about discolorations.

    Here are photos of the honed Olympian White counter tops that have been in heavy use for almost 7 years. Can you find the stains?

    Suburban kitchen · More Info


    Suburban kitchen · More Info


  • rainshivers
    2 months ago

    I agree. Never ever ever had a stain or worried about having a stain. Etching, yes, stain, no.


    Before I settled on honed Danby, I was so stressed out because everyone from my husband to contractor to even stone yard salesperson tried to talk me out of it. The first few days I stressed about any little thing set on top of the counter. Once I got my first etch, I felt huge relief lol. I can even tell you how I got most of them but they are not very visible. You have to go looking for them and I find the have faded or something over time.

  • Barbara C
    2 months ago

    @ehwilli20 I feel the same way about marble! I really wanted to find a granite I loved for our kitchen and I just couldn’t. We had a More penetrating sealer applied during fabrication. It comes with a twenty year warranty against staining and it doesn’t change the look of the stone at all. They also make an anti etching product but IMO, it takes away some of the depth of the stone. I use Method granite and marble cleaner mostly, but I also clean with whatever dishwashing liquid I’m using- usually Ivory. I believe any product used needs to be ph neutral.


    it seems like you are not going to be happy with anything but marble!



  • rhonda2227
    2 months ago

    @rainshivers I am looking at the Danby marble. Love both Imperial and Olympia. Confirming you have the Imperial? Your slabs are gorgeous and love how they have less spaced out veining. do you see a log of green Or blue in them or more tan/gold and gray?

  • rainshivers
    2 months ago

    Hi Rhonda, thank you! I think mine are Imperial but I am not 100 percent certain. I’ll see if I can find the paperwork somewhere.


    i mostly see tan and gold in mine, although looking closely I do also see faint green and even grey. But the veining is tan/gold in the majority of the bigger veins

  • rainshivers
    2 months ago

    I just found it in my emails - it’s Imperial Dandy

  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC
    2 months ago

    Imperial is definitely warmer than Olympian White, as rainshivers commented--it has tan and gold. Olympian is more gray/white with no warm veining.