SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
piantini_gw

Planting Schedule

piantini
12 years ago

I found this planting schedule for my zone online and I wonder how accurate it is. I am really interested more on the maturity lenght.

The reason why I ask is because every year I planted beets, carrots, etc. (cool season veggies) in May and harvest them in Fall. Basically takes me longer that the time mention in the package. So thats about 4-1/2' month of waiting time. So, I thought maybe it has to do with me planting the veggies in the summer which problably affects the growth of the cool season veggies?

The schedule mentions harvesting beets and carrots within 2 months (or half the time) which coordinates with the package harvest time.

I don't have this issue with my summer crops (tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, etc)

If this is true, I can triple my harvest (spring, summer, fall crop) within the same space which I am very limited.

I am really worry that some of my summer veggies get delay if my spring crop does not mature in time. I am not as worry for the fall crop since I can live without it.

I do get at least 9 hours of sun, and plant my veggies in two 4x8 square foot boxes. Both Contain Mel's Mix.

{{gwi:33077}}

Comments (14)

  • dave_f1 SC, USDA Zone 8a
    12 years ago

    I like how that table is organized and has alot of info in a small space. It's of course greatly generalized, and has some questionable dates. Right, I've never had carrots ready to harvest in 60-70 days, or whatever the seed pack or this table has. It's more like 4 months! They take 2 weeks+ to germinate, and then just sit there for 3-4 more weeks. Anyway, in your area you should be able to grow broccoli, carrots, beets, and maybe peas in both the spring and fall. I'm not sure why the table suggests growing irish potatoes in the summer..that doesn;t seem right to me. I grow potatoes March-May and then plant sweetpotatoes in the same space in the summer and early fall.

  • steve22802
    12 years ago

    You are planting your spring crops much too late. The cool weather crops like the cool weather and will grow and taste better when grown in the cold. You should start planting your spring crops outdoors starting right now as indicated by your chart. Peas, radishes, spinach, beets, turnips and bunching onions can all be planted in the garden right now.

    There's a planting chart from Virginia Tech that I like a little better than the one shown above. Their chart is designed so that you write in your frost free date over the 7th column (00) and then subtract 10 days for each previous column and add ten days for each successive column so you end up with a chart that is customized for your specific planting zone.

    If you want to push your spring crops to grow a little faster you can presprout the seeds before planting and then give them some protection outdoors during the first month by using floating row covers or a small hoop house of some sort.

  • Related Discussions

    Plant design idea!

    Q

    Comments (3)
    Your choices for plants will be determined by what zone you live in. Do you have extremelly cold winters such as MN or live in the South such as FL? You have a beautiful home from what I can see. Anitajoyce is right the first picture is staying tiny.
    ...See More

    edible plants - patio

    Q

    Comments (1)
    Gardening magazines often have this sort of information. You can try Amazon, but I'd recommend local advice because it will suit your climate. If it wasn't november, I'd recommend cherry tomatoes and peppers designed for planters --- hot peppers can be quite prolific, but, of course, I like in Russia, a climate where you really need a greenhouse to grow sweet peppers in the summer. For the fall, you could start artichokes, they are sculptural and tasty. Beans can be quick from planting to harvest --- put I really don't know about your climate. I'm good for what to plant when your summers are short and springs and falls are cold.
    ...See More

    Succulent plants dying? Saved from Lowes, not sure what's wrong.

    Q

    Comments (3)
    Without photos it's about impossible to diagnose the problem. I can say that Fenestraria are tricky plants. They can't tolerate water at the wrong times. They're similar to Lithops and Pleiospilos. Also, cacti are adapted to desert environments where they get rain only for a short time the whole year. Under normal conditions, watering a cactus more than once a month or so is too much. Of course, there are many variables and without photos and more info, I can't be sure what's going on. My first guess is rot from too much water. Is there a camera on the computer or phone you're using right now? Maybe a friend can photograph them for you?
    ...See More

    How to plant or improve this massive retaining wall

    Q

    Comments (16)
    Hi, The previous posters were correct. The walls all failed and our house fell down the canyon. Fortunately, some charitable coyotes took us in as their own and have taught us how to hunt. I still can't get used to the taste of cottontail. OK truthsies. I had a slope engineer come out. He said the wood walls are not doing any retaining (which is obvious since they can be peeled off pretty easily) and that our issue was really soil retention. His suggestion was to cut back at the top near our pool and put in a 3 foot wall and then grade the slope down to the bottom and plant. The cinder block walls, though not super attractive, are not at risk for failure in any near term and will be replaced when we hit the lotto. Thanks for the interest. I promise to update this thread as soon as there's some progress.
    ...See More
  • kanuk
    12 years ago

    piantini~ I like how the chart is organized as well. Can you tell us where to find the chart and can we customize it to our own zone?
    Regarding carrots...aren't there various varieties that would mature quicker or can be harvested as 'baby carrots' that you could plant to harvest early or 'first harvest crops'. Types like Kinko(52days), Parmex(50days)small round carrots etc.
    Then plant main crop carrots that would remain in the ground until maturity later in the season.
    I'm just getting into veg gardening for the first time this year so don't know if I'm being practical or not.
    Check out johnnyseeds dot com
    Look up carrots and they seem to organize them by early and main crop varieties.
    Maturity dates seem to be the factor. If you can rely on that info is another question!
    steve~ thanks for the link

  • digdirt2
    12 years ago

    am really interested more on the maturity lenght.

    DTM or days to maturity is just a very general guideline, a "guesstimate" if you will, even under ideal conditions. There are too many variables that can affect it such as age of seed, weather, soil fertility, sun exposure or lack thereof, water and feeding programs, pest & diseases, etc. to make it accurate.

    Over times and with good note keeping you can learn what the "nearly" actual DTM is for a particular variety in your particular garden but even that is still an approximation.

    As already mentioned by others, I would have some real problems using the dates on the chart above in our zone as it is late dates for planting many crops here. Your most valid indicator for proper planting times is soil temps, not air temps and not a date on a calendar so if you can start doing some measuring and record keeping it will give you much more accurate planting schedule. ;)

    every year I planted beets, carrots, etc. (cool season veggies) in May

    Way too late for this zone. Especially in raised beds which warm up so much faster.

    So, I thought maybe it has to do with me planting the veggies in the summer which problably affects the growth of the cool season veggies?

    Very true.

    plant my veggies in two 4x8 square foot boxes

    Unfortunately, the smaller size of your beds will limit somewhat the number and/or amount of things you can grow regardless of when you plant them - at least for any notable levels of production. You can either (a) restrict the number of crops you choose to grow in any season, or (b) restrict the numbers of that crop (EX: 2 1'sqs. of beets for a total of 10 rather than an 8 foot long row) as that will free up more room for other crops at their planting times. Sq. foot gardening is based on intensive planting of a few crops rather than the planting of lots of crops.

    Because of many of the professional garden pics we see, many assume that the entire garden must be planted with something within a short period of time. Not true. Save some space for those things that will planted within a couple of weeks. ;)

    Dave

  • piantini
    Original Author
    12 years ago

    First of all, thank you all for your responses. Took me a while to read it since I have been really busy.

    Second, kanuk asked for the link, which I will provide below "Chart". Just put your zipcode and the chart generates for your area.

    digdirt, you are always so helpfull, I should have been more specific in regards to the area used for planting. I use both of my 4x8 boxes for all my veggies except for tomatos, cucumbers and eggplants. For example, carrots, I typically use (4) 1sqft space.

    I actually was very please with the abundant amount of veggies I get from the boxes, more than before since is more organized. I plant my tomatoes, cucumbers, and eggplants in another area. I do follow sqft garden to the rules.

    Steve, You are scaring the heck out of me. How is it I am late for the spring crop already?. My soil is hard as a rock?. How do you prepare, condition, tilt your soil under those circustances?.

    I was thinking of starting them inside and transfer them as soon as the soil is workable. I am making my own newspaper pots so I don't disturb the roots. I am making them big enought to pot once only.

    Everywhere I read in regards to planting cool season veggies, It specifically mentions the date to plant 'OR' as soon the soil is workable.

    davefl,

    exactly my feeling. I was trying to make sense and trust the chart. After all, I been doing it all wrong as far as planting cool season veggies is concern.

    Does anyone has their own schedule that had been proven that works?. The schedule I need uses most if not all square foot spaces for spring, summer and fall crop.

    I can adjust dates per my zone and frost time. Thanks!

    Here is a link that might be useful: Chart

  • digdirt2
    12 years ago

    How is it I am late for the spring crop already?. My soil is hard as a rock?. How do you prepare, condition, tilt your soil under those circustances?.

    These all go in the square foot beds, right? Then your Mel's Mix soil shouldn't need much in the way of preparation - just mix in some fresh compost. And if they are going into garden dirt somewhere else, a sharp pointed hoe does the job. ;)

    Seriously, if your zone is right, then I agree with Steve all the peas, radishes, spinach, beets, turnips and bunching onions can all be planted in the garden right now. Mine are in and up and even with the unusual 27 degree nights this week and the snow flurries - doing fine. The soil temps are fine for them now.

    But if you can't get them in this week that's fine too. Just do so as soon as your can and you'll be fine. ;)

    Dave

  • kanuk
    12 years ago

    Piantini
    Thanks for the chart link

  • piantini
    Original Author
    12 years ago

    kanuk,

    No problem, any time.

    Dave,

    Mel's mix in beds is hard as a rock!. How do you mix in fresh compost with the mix frozen?. I don't think a hoe will do much other than break it into chunks.

    I guess I can always cover the beds with black plastic to warm it in a nice sunny day then try it.

    Also, I guess I can add a 3" top layer of compost on the beds and plant the seeds in there.

  • medcave
    12 years ago

    piantini, I had a problem with that website's chart, but it was easily solved. It correctly identified my Zone 8 based on my zip-code, but the chart below stayed on Zone 7. I looked at the website url and saw that it was still on Zone 7, so I just substituted an 8 and hit refresh and got the correct chart.

    Maybe you're not getting the correct chart for your actual Zone? Anyway, thanks for the link, it is a nice chart.

  • digdirt2
    12 years ago

    Mel's mix in beds is hard as a rock!. How do you mix in fresh compost with the mix frozen?

    piantini - I'm beginning to have my doubts about your garden zone? ;) You sure you are a zone 7?

    Frozen Mel's mix??? 1/3 compost, 1/3 peat, and 1/3 vermiculaite shouldn't freeze (except maybe in northern Michigan ;) unless the beds drain poorly. Never seen it happen here. Even those weeks here when we consistently run in the 20's for several days, mine never freezes. Are you sure it isn't just a dry crust on top?

    At any rate water it down good, let it drain, or cover with the plastic, then work it. As to the compost, you don't have to till it in or even mix deeply. Just spread it out on the top as you said, stir each square a little as you plant and viola' ready to go.

    Dave

  • piantini
    Original Author
    12 years ago

    medcave,

    My zone is right but thanks for the comment.

    Dave,

    I am actually between zone 6 and 7 in Providence, RI. Yes I do have a third of compost peat and vermiculite and I did freeze. However, it could very well be a dry crust on the top. I try to break it with my hands and it was frozen.

    There is a problem with drainage in my backyard, Two properties drain naturally to my backyard and pools in that area. Could this be the reason? In a nice warm day the soil around this time becomes mud.

    This weekend was nice enough to thaw everything and finally tilted the soil and planted spinach and onions. the mel's mix was really nice and soft.

    I will be going to Lowe's today to purchase cow and chicken manure, and mix it in my beds where I have not planted anything yet. And I will be adding bones and blood meal to the spinach and onions when there true leaves come out. I did not have a chance to add the compost at the top as I mention.

    I am really happy my mel's mix loosed up, and because of that I did not had to start the seeds indoors and now have room to grow my summer plants starting early April.

    Thank you for the advice Dave, you are always very helpfull.

  • digdirt2
    12 years ago

    There is a problem with drainage in my backyard, Two properties drain naturally to my backyard and pools in that area. Could this be the reason?

    Yes, that would explain it. If it gets and remains saturated it could freeze. Be good to try to alter that drainage away from the bed if possible. Even a shallow trench to redirect the flow a little would help.

    Or there is always the old "wall of sandbags" trick. ;)

    Dave

  • piantini
    Original Author
    12 years ago

    Dave,

    I spent some money re-grading my lawn so that the water drain away from the building. That was my priority. The city did not allow me to alter the drainage away from my property. So as long as it stays in my property or goes out to the street I am ok.

    So I decided to pool everything in the left corner of the property (backyard). I only have this problem now when the snow melts and the ground still frozen.

    Its funny you mention about the wall of sandbags trick, because thats exactly where my tomatoes, cucumbers & eggplants patch is, against that fence.

    I do have to admit, when it rains, that area keeps nice and moist longer than everywhere else which is nice.

    everything will end soon, we are already getting 50 degree weather during the day occacionally.

  • jfhext_gmail_com
    10 years ago

    For RI, I find the schedule linked below to be very useful, esp. since when it lists havest dates, it does so relative to transplant (or seeding), which I find helpful.

    --John

    Here is a link that might be useful: RI Veg planting scheduled