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girlndocs

Rhubarb jam recipe, PLEASE?

girlndocs
15 years ago

I am coming to you all in frustration after Googling and finding only link after link to the same $#@! "strawberry rhubarb" jam recipe that involves strawberry Jello. Augh!

I have about 2 quarts of fresh chopped rhubarb to make jam from. I have Ball no-sugar-needed pectin at my disposal, but if rhubarb is one of those fruits like cranberries that will jell on their own why waste the pectin?

Any recipes and tips appreciated!

Thanks,

Kristin

Comments (67)

  • readinglady
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    It's true for both asparagus and rhubarb, as long as the stalks aren't old. Asparagus, for example, is a grass, and with the fat stalks what you're getting is more "meat" between the long fibrous strands.

    Carol

  • mellyofthesouth
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    What do you guys and gals think of this one:

    RHUBARB PICKLES WITH CARAMELIZED ONIONS

    # 1 lb. fresh rhubarb, cut into 1/2-inch chunks

    # 3 T. kosher or other coarse salt

    # 1/4 cup vegetable oil

    # 3 onions, peeled and cut into small dice (2 1/2-3 cups)

    # 1/2 c. dried cranberries or golden raisins

    # 1 c. sherry vinegar

    # 1 c. brown sugar

    # 1 c. cranberry juice

    # Juice and grated zest of 1 orange

    # 1 jalapeno or other small fresh chili of your choice, seeded and minced

    # 3 T. peeled, grated fresh ginger

    # 1 t. ground cloves

    In a large non-reactive bowl, combine the rhubarb with salt. Mix well and let stand for 1 hour. Drain the rhubarb, then rinse and drain it again. Set aside. In a large saute pan over medium-high heat, heat the oil until hot but not smoking. Add the onions and saute, stirring, until they are lightly browned, 11-13 minutes. Sprinkle with the dried cranberries and set aside to cool.

    In a medium non-reactive saucepan, combine the vinegar, brown sugar, cranberry juice and orange juice and bring just to a simmer over medium-high heat, stirring once or twice to dissolve the sugar. Add the orange zest, jalapeno, ginger and cloves, bring back to a simmer and then remove from the heat.

    Add the cooled onions and cranberries to the rhubarb and pour the hot syrup on top. Allow to cool to room temperature, uncovered, then cover and refrigerate. These pickles are delicious served with grilled beef. Puree some and drizzle it over soft-shelled crabs or pork. Makes about 4 cup.

    Source: "Quick Pickles: Easy Recipes With Big Flavor" by Chris Schlesinger, John Willoughby and Dan George (Chronicle Books, 2001, $18.95).

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  • readinglady
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Sort of a chutney, isn't it? Or reminds me of a Victorian Ketchup. I could be totally wrong, but to me this sounds awful. Sometimes, though, things turn out much better than you think.

    Carol

  • led_zep_rules
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Hi, we like our rhubarb jam very rhubarb-y, so we made a low sugar recipe last year, but with regular pectin. The rhubarb must have had plenty of pectin since it jelled fine. At least I recall it did, we ate the jam so fast it is hard to be sure! I felt very guilty about putting the food coloring in, but I had more green than red rhubarb and the original color of the jam was a bit off-putting to say the least. Made me realize why so many of those darn recipes have jello in them, it is partly for the nice red color!

    Rhubarb Jam

    12 c rhubarb
    3 Tbs pectin (powdered)
    3 c sugar
    lime juice cubes (2 or 3?)
    dash red food color

    Put sugar on diced rhubarb and let it sit overnight to suck water out. Cooked and reduced it for about 15 miutes with lime juice, and added pectin near end. My recipe is homemade so your mileage may vary. Rhubarb is high acid, though, so it should be safe enough.

    Marcia

  • sosusie
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Melly, If your offer still stands, I'd like to see the Rhubarb, Orange and Apple jam recipe, please. Thanks!
    SOS

  • ksrogers
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Led Zep, throw in a few strawberries, they will give the red color better than the food coloring.

  • mellyofthesouth
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Here you go:

    Confiture of Rhubarb, Orange and Apple
    1/2 pound (200g) oranges
    1 pound 9 ounces (700g) rhubarb, 1 pound 2ounces (500g) net after being cleaned
    1 3/4 pounds Ida Red apples, 1 pound 2 ounces (500g) net
    1 cup (200g) granulated sugar plus 3 3/4 cups (880g)
    3 1/2 ounces water
    Juice of one small lemon

    Wash the oranges in cold water and slice them into very thin rounds. In a preserving pan, poach the slices with 1 cup sugar and the water. Continue cooking until the slices are translucent. Add the washed unpeeled rhubarb, which has been but into dice, and the apples, which have been peeled cored, and cut into thin slices, the lemon juice, and sugar. Bring everything to a boil and cook 5 minutes, stirring gently. Skim carefully and return to a boil. Skim again if needed. Check the set. Put the jam into jars immediately and seal.

    LedZep,
    Raspberries also made it very red. But even with 2/3's rhubarb and 1/3 raspberry, the raspberry flavor won. (Of course it is still very tasty.) If I made it again, I might just use some of the juice that ran out from the thawed raspberries and then use the raspberries for something else.

  • mellyofthesouth
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I put a link below for the recipe that I used for the rhubarb ginger jam, except that doubled it (since most of my recipes started with 2 pounds of rhubarb) and I substituted about a cup of honey for a cup of sugar.

    Here is a photo of the finished products.

    And check out the policitclly incorrect jars of jam (guava and banana) we bought on a lark in France.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Rhubarb Ginger Jam

  • annie1992
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I like plain rhubarb better than I do rhubarb mixed with strawberries or raspberries because those flavors do seem to over shadow the rhubarb. I just like rhubarb plain the best but Dad likes the strawberry/rhubarb combination in jam and in pie. I also find that even strawberries (plain or with rhubarb) will turn brown and not necessarily keep the red color without some "help".

    I also have the green variety of rhubarb and you're right, Led Zep, it's not pretty when made into jam. LOL I just break down and add the food coloring.

    Annie

  • AmandaAlna
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I've tried making the plain rhubarb and sugar jam, and it was great, but I discovered my favorite rhubarb recipe this year. It sounds a little weird, but you'll just have to make it and taste. It's from The Big Book of Preserving the Harvest, by Carol Costenbader.

    RHUBARB CHUTNEY

    2 large oranges
    2.5 lbs rhubarb, washed & cut to 1"
    5 1/3 c firmly packed lt brn sugar
    4 c cider vinegar
    2 c golden raisins
    2 med onions, peeled & chopped
    1 Tbs yellow mustard seeds
    12 whole allspice berries (or 2 tsp ground)
    12 whole black peppercorns

    Grate the zest from both oranges and set aside

    Halve and then section both oranges as you would a grapefruit, removing the white membranes. Place in a 2-qt bowl.

    Chop the orange sections coarsely. Squeeze any remaining juices out of the orange halves into the chopped sections.

    Combine the rhubarb, oranges and orange zest, sugar, vinegar, raisins, and onions in a 4-qt saucepan.

    Tie the spices in a cheesecloth bag and add to the pan. Slowly bring the mixture to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar.

    Simmer uncovered until thick, about 1-1.5 hours, being careful not to burn and stirring often. Remove the spice bag.

    Ladle into hot, clean jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace. Cap and seal.

    Process for 10 minutes in a boiling-water-bath canner. Adjust for altitude if necessary.

    -----------------------------------------------------------
    Last week I made enough batches (4) for 25 jars and already 10 jars have been stolen by chutney-sampling friends! So far, it tastes amazing on grilled pork chops or with salted pita chips. I'll be making 4 more batches in 2 weeks.

  • annie1992
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    amandaalna, I don't think it sounds weird at all, I think it sounds very good. In fact, I think it sounds good enough that I ought to try it!

    Did you put yours in pints or half pints? If you got 25 jars from 4 batches that's about 6 jars per batch, but I don't know what size, it seems like some of those ingredients would cook down quite a lot.

    Annie

  • zabby17
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Ooh, I've really enjoyed catching up on this post.
    Would someone who has the Small-Batch Preserving book share the Gingered Rhubarb Jam recipe? I am SO in the mood for getting started on the season's preserving this weekend, having had my expected weekend visitor cancel on me (what is the world coming to when one's 10-year-old niece can't fit one into her busy schedule, LOL).

    BTW, Kristin, I was v. amused by your stories of finding the recipe-from-the-hot-place all over (have had the same experience in other research projects sometimes!). Though I note that this:

    > One person even claimed it was her great-grandmother's recipe, LOL.

    is not actually impossible --- Jell-O has been around for over 100 years, believe it or not (I was stunned to discover this, as I'd assumed it came around with cake mixes and other quickie cooking developments in the 50s). My own grandmother's recipe box contains dozens of Jell-O salads (ugh), some of them dating from pretty early in her marriage, and very possibly received from my great-grandmother. I don't have kids, but my sister has a 19-year-old, who could thus potentially claim such a recipe as being from a great-GREAT-grandmother!!

    Anyway, I'm so glad your rhubarb jam worked out. It's kind of like magic when something jells, especially when you didn't add pectin, isn't it?

    Zabby
    P.S. I had the argument with a friend last weekend about thick vs. thin asparagus. My experience matched with Carol's et al. here --- thick is usually tenderer and tastier. This friend is a very accomplished chef but not very knowledgeable about where the food COMES FROM before it gets to the store!

  • readinglady
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Here's a new Rhubarb Chutney recipe I just got, so can't vouch for it personally but it looked worth saving. It comes from a Portland (OR) chef who's a true rhubarb aficionado.

    Rhubarb Chutney

    Makes 2 to 3 pints

    2 tablespoons vegetable oil
    3 cups thinly sliced shallots or onions
    1 tablespoon salt
    4 cups 1/4-inch slices trimmed rhubarb
    1 cup golden raisins
    1 tablespoon mustard seeds
    2 teaspoons lightly crushed coriander seeds
    Pinch cayenne
    1 cinnamon stick
    3 1/8-inch slices fresh ginger, with skin
    31/2 cups firmly packed brown sugar
    2 cups cider vinegar

    Put the oil in a large heavy saute pan or large saucepan and warm. Add the shallots or onions and cook until softened, about 5 minutes.

    Combine the mustard seed, coriander seed, cayenne, cinnamon and ginger with 1/4 cup water in a medium saucepan. Add the brown sugar, vinegar, and salt and heat until the liquid is hot. Remove from the heat and let stand to "bloom" the flavors (let the spices soften and release flavor) for about 15 minutes.

    Add the shallots, bring to a slow boil and cover. Simmer 5 minutes, then remove the ginger slices and cinnamon stick. Add the rhubarb and raisins and stir to combine. Cover and cook without stirring for 10 to 20 more minutes, until the rhubarb is tender and the chutney is slightly thickened. (It won't be a thick consistency, but it will firm up a bit as it cools.)

    Season to taste with black pepper and additional salt, if necessary. Refrigerate up to two weeks.

    Note: To keep the chutney for several months, can it: Wash 4 to 6 half-pint jars and fill with hot water until needed. Prepare lids as manufacturer directs.

    Ladle hot chutney into 1 hot jar at a time, leaving 1/4-inch head space. Wipe jar rim with a clean, damp cloth. Attach lid. Fill and close remaining jars. Process in a boiling-water canner for 10 minutes (15 minutes up to 6,000 feet altitude; 20 minutes above 6,000 feet). Store in a cool, dark, dry place. -- From Ellen Jackson

    Zabby, here's your recipe:

    Gingered Rhubarb Jam with Honey

    1 lemon
    2 cups (500 mL) chopped fresh or frozen rhubarb
    1 large tart apple, peeled, cored and finely chopped
    1/2 cup water (125 mL)
    1 1/2 cups granulated sugar (375 mL)
    1 cup liquid honey (250 mL)
    1 1/2 tbsp finely chopped candied or crystallized ginger (20 mL)

    Remove thin outer rind from lemon and cut into fine strips (or use a zester). Place lemon rind in a medium non-reactive saucepan. Squeeze juice from lemon and reserve 1 Tbsp (15 mL).

    Add rhubarb, apple and water to saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat, cover, reduce heat and boil gently for 15 minutes or until fruit is tender.

    Add sugar, honey, ginger and reserved lemon juice. Return to a boil and boil rapidly, uncovered until mixture will form a gel, about 8 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from heat.

    Do the usual with the jars and BWB 10 minutes (5 if jars are sterile). Makes 3 1/4 cups (800 mL).

    I have to put in a plug for this wonderful book. I have a ton of books, but if I were to buy one canning book, this would be it. All the routine stuff I can get online at the University of Georgia or the Jarden site, but these recipes are wonderful, safe and reliable. Top-notch resource for anyone unfamiliar with this book.

    Returning to rhubarb, Topp and Howard also provide recipes for Rhubarb and Blueberry Jam; Rhubarb, Date and Apricot Chutney; Rhubarb Gooseberry Jam; and Rhubarb Strawberry Jam.

    Happy preserving,
    Carol

  • zabby17
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Thanks much, Carol!

    It'll be fun looking for crystallized ginger in my little town.

    I really have to get a copy of this book; the rhubarb apricot chutney sounds delightful, too.

    Zabby

  • readinglady
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Zabby, Ellie Topp actually includes her own recipe for Candied Ginger in the book, and that's what she uses in her jam.

    Carol

  • ksrogers
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Crystalized ginger is usually found in asian food stores. I get it locally in some bigger supermarkets in the Chinese food section in small jars or boxes. I have also bought fresh, peeled and sliced very thin, then packed in a jar with some sugar and sherry wine. It keeps forever in that, while in the refrigerator.

  • zabby17
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    > I get it locally in some bigger supermarkets in the Chinese food section

    Oh, I have bought it easily before when I lived in Toronto! But in my lily-white loyalist town of 4,000, things are more interesting. You should have seen me going up and down Main Street in search of lime leaves for Thai cooking....

    Mind you, it's a pretty funky town for its size, and I DID find dried lime leaves eventually. I think I will find candied ginger. (And if not I will make it myself. Or pick some up when I'm in Toront for meetings on Monday.) But it's always a fun adventure looking for unusual items here.

    Zabby

  • annie1992
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Zabby, I bought my last batch in a health food store, ginger is good for motion sickness and so it's sold there sometimes.

    Annie

  • ksrogers
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I have never used lime leaves. If you do have a problem locating it, there are plent of web sites that do sell it. I even have some dried ginger pieces that I use in a spice mix for pickles. Recently, I paid about $10, for two tiny ounces of dried wood ears (the black fungus which is used in some soups), and then found a site that offers a 5 pound bag (maybe .5?) for $15. I expect it should arrive soon. If it is in fact 5 pounds, then its a bargain.

  • zabby17
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    > I have never used lime leaves.

    I never had either, till I moved to a small town and got Thai food withdrawal and decided to try cooking my own!

    We do have a health food store and a fancy-food store (cheeses, shmancy preserves & candies, etc.) and, where I found the lime leaves in the end, a kind of "teas and coffees of the world" store that also does all kinds of condiments. So someone will have crystallized ginger. But I didn't get out to look for it this weekend as I got caught up in some committee work. Sigh --- two more weeks and I'm off that board, and way more time for canning!

    Zabby

  • readinglady
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Zabby, I just wanted to mention if you're in the "big city" and have an opportunity to pick up fresh lime leaves, I've found they freeze very well. I haven't noticed any change/reduction in flavor using the frozen instead of the fresh. I've also vacuum-sealed and frozen lemongrass with equally good results.

    (Another person who suffers Thai-withdrawal)

    Carol

  • flora_uk
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Mellyofthesouth - I'm not sure that your jam is as politically incorrect as you think. I'm assuming you're referring to the image on the label. It's hard to read the print but I suspect that this jam is produced in the French Antilles ie Martinique or Guadeloupe and merely shows a citizen in the traditional costume of the islands. The headgear would not have the connotations it might have in the States.

    As for rhubarb jam. I have just made a batch of rhubarb and orange jam. 2 kg rhubarb, 2 kg sugar, 3 oranges. Cut up the rhubarb and leave mixed with the sugar for 24 hours. Cut the oranges up finely ( peel and all) and boil til tender. Add to the rhubarb. Bring to the boil and boil til it reaches 105c or reaches a set. Pour into warm sterilized jars and cover.

  • zabby17
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Carol, thanks! I'll try that. I freeze lemon grass in pre-cut two-inch chunks --- though last year I found a seedling for sale at the local garden show and had fresh in a pot all summer long. This year I was out of town the weekend of the garden show, though. Humph. And I was in the big city yesterday, planning to make a garden-centre run between meetings to get herb seedlings, and wouldn't you know it, the transit workers held a wildcat strike and I couldn't get to the garden centre. Grrrr.

    Zabby, having herb withdrawal (but doesn't know when she would find the time to pot up herbs anyway, as she still has only 1/3 of her tomatoes in the ground)

  • AmandaAlna
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Annie-
    Sorry! They were 1/2 pint jars.
    Amanda

  • annie1992
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Amanda, thank you.

    Annie

  • ksrogers
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Gee, I have a few leftover rosemary plants here.. Also some extra dill. The dill is coming up everywhere it grew last year, just like a weed..

  • zabby17
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    ken, for once I managed to overwinter a rosemary (indoors; it NEVER survives our winters outside), so that's one of the few I've got. I started some dill from seed, but it's only just barely getting its first leaves. If you're harvesting it already from your rampant patches, I'm officially jealous!

    Zabby, who actually managed to kill some mint over the last winter --- who knew it was POSSIBLE to kill mint? But I did; all 3 varieties I've had for several years failed to come back in their pots -- but one popped up in a pot that was supposed to be lemon balm. Go figure.

  • ksrogers
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I had a two year ol tarragon plant that died back in fall (in its pot), then shot up about half a dozen new shoots the following spring. I was amazed by its hardiness. Was able to seperate some of the new shoots roots and planted a few outside. They did quite well last summer. I expected at least my indoor one to resprout again, but nothing showed up this year. The one outside was also not showing any signs of life, except this early spring I saw a few very small green shoots that disappeared. I suspect that a chewing varmint ate the new shoots off. Now, I have no tarragon this year. I will try to find some again. The rosemary was started from 'primed' seeds indoors, and have just been planted at the edge of my garden. Yes, mint is aggressive and so can oregano.

  • robinkateb
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Ooh, I am going to have to save this whole thread for next summer. We are buying a new house and it has a small rhubarb patch. We will own it by the middle of July, by which time I assume the rhubarb will too old. The house is vacant right now but I still don't think i can go and pick what will be rhubarb.

    Zabby, I had similar problems with thai food withdrawal when we lived in Pennsylvania. I was able to make a still delicious Tom kar Gai with clam juice instead of fish sauce and another sub for the kaffir lime leaves.

    -Robin

    here is another recipe for Ginger Rhubarb jam

    From Reading House innkeeper Rita Newell
    Can be prepared in 45 minutes or less.
    1 1-pound package frozen sliced rhubarb (unthawed)
    1 1/4 cups sugar
    3 tablespoons chopped crystallized ginger (about 1 ounce)
    1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
    Combine all ingredients in heavy medium saucepan. Stir over medium-high heat until sugar dissolves. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer until jam thickens and mounds on spoon, stirring often to prevent scorching, about 20 minutes. Transfer to bowl. Cover; chill. (Can be prepared 1 week ahead. Keep chilled.

    Makes 1 1/2 Cups.

  • zabby17
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    robinkate, just remember my woeful experience if you plan on doing any building! I had a perfectly good rhubarb plant in my old house, loveingly tended in a pot for over a year, and I left it behind because there was a whole patch at the new house. But by the time I got here, BF and hired excavator had bulldozed several tonnes of earth from the foundation for BF's new workshop right on top of the rhubarb patch! Rhubarb's a tough plant, but it couldn't survive this. So I had to start again with a wee seedling last year....

    That Tom kar Gai sounds lovely, btw. Got a bit brave tonight and invented my own shrimp stir fry with Thai red curry paste, lime juice, fish sauce, and garlic!

    Zabby

  • robinkateb
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Zabby, this soup is great!! The only problem with it is the chicken is often dry. A coworker of DH's owns a Thai restaurant and is married to a Thai woman. he says they just throw in the chicken right before serving. btw, any other recipes you want he may be able to help. he has offered to supply any recipes from the restaurant folks at the office want. The food at the restaurant is the best i have ever had.

    This recipe is from the Frugal Gourmet.

    Thai Chicken and Lemongrass Soup

    6 cups chicken stock
    4 slices dried galangal root
    1 slice of fresh ginger
    2 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced
    3 shallots peeled and sliced
    7 dried Kaffir Lime Leaves
    3 stalks lemongrass peeled and the bottom 5 inches chopped
    1 tsp Thai red curry paste
    1 Tbsp sugar
    1 14 oz can coconut milk
    3 Tbsp fish sauce
    1/4 lb thinly sliced skinless and boneless chicken breast
    2 small jalepeno peppers seeded and thinly sliced
    2 Tbsp fresh squeezed lime juice
    S & P
    Chopped cilantro for garnish
    Place the Stock, galanga root, ginger, garlic, shallots, kaffir lime leaves, lemongrass and red curry paste in a 6 qt pot. Simmer for 10 minutes and than drain the solids out and discard them.
    Return the stock to the pot with the sugar, coconut milk and fish sauce and bring to a simmer. Add the chicken and bring to a simmer again. Simmer for 5 minutes. Add the remaining ingredients except cilantro and bring to serving temperature. Garnish with cilantro and serve.

    -Robin

    p.s. i meant to say will be my rhubarb. no danger of being excavated under, it is up against the fence.

  • readinglady
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Thanks for the soup recipe, robinkate. That sounds great. "Frugal Gourmet." That's a name I haven't heard in a while. I used to watch all Jeff Smith's shows, especially as he was almost "local," (PNW).

    Here we harvest rhubarb from May to as late as October. We just keep it well-watered and monitor to see if additional feeding is required. I think depending on climate and also location, you may get lucky and discover there's still some rhubarb around. With your Northern location, it might we worth giving a call to the Extension to see what the Master Gardeners say about your locality's season.

    P.S. That rhubarb-ginger jam also sounds great. I'll bet it would be good swirled in a Fool. (Not that kind of Fool, LOL.)

    Carol

  • mellyofthesouth
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    This is the rhubarb ginger jam that I made from epicurious. I successfully doubled the recipe and processed in a bwb.

    RHUBARB-GINGER JAM
    From Reading House innkeeper Rita Newell

    Can be prepared in 45 minutes or less.

    Combine all ingredients in heavy medium saucepan. Stir over medium-high heat until sugar dissolves. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer until jam thickens and mounds on spoon, stirring often to prevent scorching, about 20 minutes. Transfer to bowl. Cover; chill. (Can be prepared 1 week ahead. Keep chilled.

    Makes 1 1/2 Cups.
    Bon Appit
    July 1997

    I put the link there in case you want to read the reviews.

    Here is a link that might be useful: rhubarb ginger jam

  • ksrogers
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    FYI, Frugal Gourmet Jeff Smith was arrested on molestation charges some years ago, so his shows are no longer shown.

  • readinglady
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Actually charges were never brought and there was no trial. He and his insurance company settled out of court. Only the people involved know the truth of the matter.

    Jeff Smith died in 2004.

    Carol

  • annie1992
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    You are correct, Carol, there were allegations but charges were never filed and nothing was ever proven.

    In spite of any cloud of suspicion, I greatly enjoyed his shows and watched them every Saturday on PBS. RobinKate sent me two of his cookbooks and I already had one. I can vouch for that soup recipe, I made it and liked it. It's become one of my boss's favorites too.

    Annie

  • zabby17
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Robin, I'll definitely give that version a try! I have made a similar soup from a recipe put out by Wandee Young, who started the first successful Thai restaurant in Toronto, Young Thailand; the difference I note off hand is that it's richer in the coconut milk and doesn't have the shallots (which sound like an excellent idea!). Galangal root I have not found in my little town, but I use fresh ginger (a friend who had tried it both ways said she found that was a better bet than dried galangal).

    Luckily, hot thai peppers grow well in pots and freeze well, so I have plenty of those for the zing....

    Zabby

  • bejay9_10
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    robinkateb -

    Ho boy - am I glad I tuned in. Was just cruising through the rhubarb recipes - even tho it may be awhile (my little seedling didn't stick the whole season - try, try next year), but then I find this really great Thai soup recipe.

    For several years, some Thai folks have been visiting me - to harvest the large forest of bamboo in my back yard (inherited from previous owners - some 40 years ago). It now encompasses about a quarter of my back yard and shows no sign of aging (they say bamboos last 100 years ??).

    Anyway these nice people would harvest the culms and sometimes would clean it out (so welcome), and then bring me some nice Thai soup. I tried to get the recipe - but the lady that made it didn't speak English, and her daughter who did, wasn't too interested in cooking I guess. But I did get the general gist of it, and it sounds very much like the one in this forum.

    Thanks again. One thing - can the curry paste be made from home made ingredients? I find that curries can be quite individual according to the maker - some I like - others not as much.

    The other ingredients can be found locally - except Kefir lime leaves - but maybe that too. The lemon grass grows readily under my mandarin tree, and all other ingredients I have or are locally available.

    The lady that made the soup, served it with nice fresh rice - it was a bit "hot" but the flavors were truly delightful. (I may tone down the Thai peppers a bit - whee!).

    I canned 6 pints of chicken yesterday, and think they turned out better than the last batch. The breasts were meatier and seemed to hold up better. I think this might be a good recipe to try it on.

    Bejay

  • robinkateb
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I would bet you can find the red curry paste in the asian section of your grocery store. I am amazed at how much more is available now then when I first had to come up with so many substitutions for this dish.

    I have never tried the red curry paste so I cannot speak to what could be used instead. Ask Annie's daughter Ashley about that. I sent Annie the obscure ingredients for this soup and she had to taste them all. Although maybe she stopped after the fish sauce. ROFL!!!

    Well, I just googled "Thai Red Curry Paste" and I found a recipe for it. As you can see there is more to it than just chiles.

    -Robin

    Here is a link that might be useful: Recipe for Thai Red Curry Paste!!!

  • bejay9_10
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    robinkateb -

    Thank you so much for the Curry Paste recipe - I downloaded it along with the Thai soup. Will definitely try it - must find some galangal and Kaffir lime -

    I think my "lady" also put bamboo shoots in her "soup" if I remember correctly.

    Bejay

  • readinglady
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    This site has another red curry paste recipe. It's somewhat more spartan, but if access to ingredients becomes an issue it might fit your needs.

    I used to use this site a lot when I had less convenient access to Asian groceries.

    Carol

    Here is a link that might be useful: Asia Recipe

  • gw:anna-maree
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Have just returned from a trip to France, where I tasted, (among many other yummy foods), some home made orange and rhubarb jam. How lucky was I to stumble across your forum! Am planning on cooking up a batch this afternoon - it's a miserable winter's day in Melbourne, perfect for jam making! Many thanks for all your ideas!

  • zabby17
    15 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    anna-maree, I hope it turns out great! While we're sweltering up here in summer it's nice to know that winter still exists over on the Other Side....

    Zabby

  • mellyofthesouth
    14 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    It's rhubarb time again! I made my first crumble of the year the other day.

  • shammierock
    14 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I made my first rhubarb pie of the season last weekend! Yummy, too! Shammie

  • flora_uk
    14 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I see that it is almost exactly a year since I made the rhubarb and orange jam batch I wrote about above. We're still eating our way through it and the taste has improved with keeping. I always have the problem of so much stuff in the freezer that we're still eating it when the next season's fresh produce is ready. the fruit which is nearly ready

  • fearlessem
    14 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Hi folks -- Just have to recommend a yummy combination I just tried -- I made a rhubarb peach crisp, using about 4 cups rhubarb and a 1.5 cups of peaches (from the freezer)... Combined with 3/4 cup of sugar and 3 Tbs flour to make the filling, then topped with my favorite crisp topping. The flavor combo was fantastic -- it is my new favorite!

    Emily

  • MLcom
    13 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    My this thread had alot of twist and turns on it. Is it too late to harvest your rhubarb? Had to move a plant since DH decided it was lawn mower food.

    The plant has now recovered with alot of tlc and behind a wire fence.

    ML

  • ksrogers
    13 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Unless the leaves are dieing out, you can harvest some of the larger stems. If the plant has just recovered from trama, it may be better to hold off and let it mature on its own. Many times, they will send up new leaves which are quite small. These are usually the result of new roots forming. If you want more plants, next year, you can slice through the middle of the crown this fall, after its leaves and stems dry up. This will give you two crowns. Then, allow it another full summer to recover. Obvously, this is a nice way to get more rhubarb in the future, so be patient..

  • bowhunters_centurytel_net
    10 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Hi All!

    Not sure if anyone is still out there connected to this thread, but thought I would try. =)

    My family loves the good old Strawberry Rhubarb freezer jam that uses jello, I love it, too. My problem is, I try to make enough of it to last us all year (they love it that much!), but I dont' want to use that much freezer space. I have tried a couple of recipes this year, water bath recipes, that have not set up. One I was afraid may not have had the right ingredients to be a jar jam, since it didn't set up, so after a few hours, I threw it in the fridge to use as syrup. Low and behold it set. =) So, I found another and tried it. It didn't set either. (What is the longest it should take to set up?)

    12 c rhubarb
    3 Tbs pectin (powdered)
    3 c sugar
    lime juice cubes (2 or 3?)
    dash red food color

    Put sugar on diced rhubarb and let it sit overnight to suck water out. Cooked and reduced it for about 15 miutes with lime juice, and added pectin near end. My recipe is homemade so your mileage may vary. Rhubarb is high acid, though, so it should be safe enough. >>>

    I like the look of the above recipe very much (it is from further up in this thread), it has very little sugar, doesn't require much in the way of other fruit (I'm trying to be as frugal as possible) and is said to set up.

    My question is this. Can I use one of my recipes that has not set up, just add commercial pectin to it? (I do like the flavor, just want it to set.) If so, how do I figure out how much pectin to add? I'm new to the jam canning process, and don't have much for local resouces, so I appreciate all the help I can get.

    Thanks!
    Gabi