joeinmo

Quartz Mountain & Quercus Fusiformis Live Oak Trees in Zone 6

joeinmo 6b-7a
April 17, 2017
last modified: April 17, 2017

This post is a continuation of other posts on Live Oak Trees growing in 6a, 6b and 7a Zones. The tree varieties include: Quartz Mountain Live Oak from Oklahoma, Northern Texas Live Oak, and other Quercus Fusiformis from Central and Northern Arkansas, Extreme Southern Colorado, and Extreme Northern New Mexico.

Current successfull locations in these zones are Southern Pennsylvania, the Ozarks of extreme Southwest Missouri, Tennessee and Virginia.

Comments (721)

  • joeinmo 6b-7a

    Brian, strip a tiny bit of the bark and see if it is green, if it is stick into a pot of moist soil.

    the one thing I noticed on my branches before I put them in the soil was that they formed tiny bumps under the water line, not roots..as soon as they did that I put them in soil.

    brian, QMLO are not bothered by humidity..they are still (Quercus Fusiformis) and can be found it very humid areas Texas

  • HU-525254581

    Thanks Joe, we'll soon see. The desert willow are both in the buckets and in soil with rooting hormones as Raymond recommends.

  • joeinmo 6b-7a




    This is is my Texas Live Oak -- from trunk up.


    It has had more growth again, another 8 inches...stop already no more growth.

  • joeinmo 6b-7a

    Brian ..you need a Hazel Smith Giant Sequoia, they are more cold Hardy and humidity resistant ... however you need to spray it with copper fungicide until it starts growing about 3 foot a year..at that point it will outgrow the fungus according to experts in California I have talked to.

  • poaky1

    Regular Sequioa's are fine with humidity`, not to poo poo what Joe says. They are used to humidity (reg Sequoia's) they have plants that thrive off of the humidity and depend on it to live, ferns and other plant life and lizards etc. As for hardiness, I don't have any comment on that. I don't want to step on any toes, I am just aware that fog/humidity is a big part of keeping many things alive on the Sequoia's.

    Joe I see your TXLO has "real bark" on it now. My QMLO still has grey smooth bark on it.


    Hu, I didn't see your email in my inbox. Sorry, I'll post my email below this post, then, erase it after I see that you have it for sure. I even checked my "trash" and "spam" folders just in case I didn't see it and it went into those folders.

    I am going to try 1 whip from "go natives" although I am likely to get acorns from Joe, Brian and (maybe) HU (you) also. I want to have as many Live oaks as possible to try out to grow in the greenhouse until they get some good trunk girth and possibly plant inground here. The guy at "go natives" says that the acorns were picked in Oklahoma, I don't know where from. I am thinking that the QMLO from Joe will likely be the ones that are most likely to be successful for me, BUT, I want to try several TXLO acorns also. I do wonder about starting sticks to possibly root, BUT, the QMLO new growth is like 1 inch now, the rest is hardened off and would NOT likely root, besides I failed to root a Willow shrub cutting. I am going to try a dormant cutting soon though. It is a "Dappled Willow" shrub. Okay, later guys.

  • HU-525254581

    Poaky, I have that, it's your mailing address I've lost.

  • HU-525254581

    Got it Poaky.

  • poaky1

    Okay Good.

  • Brian From MO.

    Joe thanks for the advice on the cold hardy/ humidity resistant sequoia! I’m going to look into that! Also awesome pic of your TXLO! It’s doing great!

  • joeinmo 6b-7a

    Poaky, you are correct Giant Sequoia are in a humid climate, however it's a very different humid climate from the Midwest or South. Giant Sequoia humidity occurs during the winter..during the summer they live in a very dry climate and get their water from seeping snow melting and runoff. ..the Midwest and South Humidity mainly occurs in the Summer when the particular Verticulim Rot that affect Giant Sequoia occurs ..because of the warm humid conditions.


    Climate: Giant sequoia is found in a humid climate characterized by dry

    summers. Mean annual precipitation varies from 35 to 55 inches (88-138

    cm). Most precipitation comes in the form of snow between October and

    April. Mean annual snowfall ranges from 144 to 197 inches (360-493 cm),

    and snow depths of 6.6 feet (2 m) or greater are common. Mean daily

    maximum temperatures for July are typically 75 to 84 degrees Fahrenheit

    (24-29 deg C). Mean minimum temperatures for January vary from 34 to 21

    degrees Fahrenheit (1 to -6 deg C) [28].


    https://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/seqgig/all.html


    There is not a ton of fog in the Mountains of California btw.. however the Giant Redwood (different than Giant Sequoia) on the coast of California receive a ton if moisture and fog.

    falling snow, rain and fog (humidity) during winter conditions do NOT allow rust rot to grow in California.



    So the Hazel Smith is more cold hardy than your average Sequoia and somewhat resistant to a warm humid climate, although they are still susceptible to the rot. They are more blue green, also I'm thinking that it really has less to do with humidty and more to do with the more waxy needles (which means keeps moisture out) vs regular Sequoia..probably to hold in moisture better during dry summers ..which probably keeps those Rust Rot spores out.

    anyway several people have had success growing these Hazel Smith

  • joeinmo 6b-7a

    Poaky, Yes it has rough bark now and I'm glad because it won't be so tempting to deer eating the bark and antler rubs, also Sun Scald should mainly be a thing of the past

  • Brian From MO.

    Joe,
    Thank you very much! I’ll replace the ones that died from the hot humidity with the Hazel Smith! Very much appreciated!

  • Steve_NEAlabama_7a

    I have a Compton oak cross pollination question, that I'm hoping some of you can help with. Would Quercus fusiformis serve as a viable cross pollinator for Quercus X comptonaie? While a single oak tree has both male and female flowers; in order to produce acorns, or at least good quantities of acorns, you typically need another oak tree of the same species for proper cross pollination. At least that's my understanding as of today, but I'm open to being reeducated on that topic. I only have one Compton oak on my property, but near it will be two Quercus fusiformis oak trees (I already have one of those two trees in place). I realize that a Compton oak is a hybrid cross between Quercus virginiana and Quercus lyrata, but I'm sort of hoping that fusiformis is similar enough to serve as a good pollinator.

  • Steve_NEAlabama_7a

    Here is a photo of my four year old Quercus fusiformis tree from Oaks of the West (their Texas nursery). This tree has grown like a weed for the past two years. I live atop a plateau in northeast Alabama; one of the few areas in the state that's still in Zone 7a based on the latest Zone maps. This tree is on a gentle sandy loam slope (more sand than loam) and we receive about 54 inches of rain annually. We sometimes experience winter night temps below 10 degrees, and on rarer instances well under zero degrees, all becase I live on the mountain. Thus, the reason I'm not attempting to grow Quercus virginiana on my place.



  • HU-525254581

    Steve, don't know that much about that but my source in Wichita and I theorized that some of the New Mexico fusiformis seed that he gave me might have hybridized with his Compton. The seedlings I gave to Brian may have Compton in them for they don't look like TXLO. Some even resemble Chinkapin and some Willow oak.

    I have 6 Compton and 6 TXLO in my yard here and 3 TXLO at my ST Clair county property in Sw Missouri. Plenty of Black Jack and Post Oak around.

  • joeinmo 6b-7a

    Steve, I think it would work

  • Brian From MO.

    Some sites say zone 7, others say -10 degrees. Probably best to order for spring instead of this fall?

  • joeinmo 6b-7a

    I wouldnt plant a Live Oak in fall in Zone 7 or 6

  • Brian From MO.

    Ok I’ll wait then. Anyway, think I’ll try that one next spring along with the cold hardy sequoia. Joe, do you have that sequoia hybrid planted?

  • joeinmo 6b-7a

    Brian, I don't, tried to get one, sold out..I have variety not as good

  • poaky1

    Thanks for that info about the Sequoia winter and summer moisture info. I had thought that the fog was a year round thing. I once had a regular Sequioa tree, but, after 2 winters it died. I thought it was from weed killer drift or too much cold, BUT, I now have lost a Pecan tree in the same spot, so, I am thinking there is something in the soil killing trees, both lived to about year 2 or 3, so, there must be a soil contamination issue. Very close to the site the farmers use Roundup in the fields, BUT, my neighbor is close to the field also, BUT, his Pecan is fine, along with all his plants. I gave him 2 Pecans, so, I should be able to get some of the Pecans when they start coming onto the tree, maybe 15 years from now.

    Steve, are you going to use a paintbrush or something to pollinate the catkins/flowers of the Q. F and Compton's oak? I GUESS that's how to make sure they cross pollinate, right? On the ones you can reach of course. That would be something to see. That sucks to be in Alabama BUT not be in a zone warm enough for a Q. Virginiana. I'd have thought that ALL of Alabama was zone 7 or 8, I didn't know anything about it's geographical differences. I'd just seen "Forest Gump" with all of those beautiful mature Live oaks in the movie. Well, I know that movie wasn't filmed in Alabama anyway, mostly South Carolina I THINK. Fusi's are nice too, BUT, they take much longer to obtain great size. BTW, Steve did you get that Fusi from "Oaks of the wild west?" Or "oaks of the West?" I got a Fusi from "Oaks of the Wild West" years ago, BUT, it was a shrub form with several super skinny trunks. It died after several years of die-back to the roots and 1 winter where it came back from previous years growth. That was a super mild winter. I didn't have a greenhouse, and I planted it in ground right away.

    Jeremy, did you receive your Live oaks yet? You got 2 of the Fusi's from Lancaster, right? I haven't ordered one yet. I was thinking I should save my money since a fdew people on here said they'd send some acorns for Fusi's to me, Q. Fusi and Q. Fusi "quartz mountain". I think I will still order 1 from Lancaster, Pa just in case my acorns dry out or I screw up somehow and have nothing. I'll check them often, BUT, I might do something wrong and they don't do well.

    Speaking of that, Joe, how moist should I keep the potting medium for the Q.MLO acorns? And also the reg Q. Fusi medium? I am planning on using 5 gal buckets with drainage holes in them for starting them. Dax on GW has mentioned those fabric pots also, BUT, I am thinking the fabric pots will freeze faster or dry out faster. I will have some smaller pots under my shelter with lights for heat also, BUT, I will also have some 5 gallon pots NOT being heated. Maybe I should use one 5 gallon bucket for several acorns, maybe 4-5 in each bucket? I would THEN have to root prune the first fall and move each seedling to separate pots. I am NOT sure about how much heat my greenhouse will hold in. Now the GH is MUCH hotter than outside, I mean when it's 87F outside the GH is over 100F it was 104F in there today, and it was 87F outside, BUT, that outside WAS in the shade, so, I guess that is the big difference. It's a good thing all I have in the GH now is hardy desert plants, they love it.

    HU, I am on the lookout for the Mags, maybe it's still too hot? Did you send them yet? I am in no hurry anyway. I will be planting them in fall anyway, they'll just be sitting on my deck until then anyway. One will be going to my best friend, and she may not water it as much as needed so fall is best. I will water it and mulch it well, and hope that she takes care of it. She loves the S Mag, so, I will just hope she cares for it. I will ask her boyfriend to water it if she doesn't. She is super busy, that is why I will have to make sure somebody thinks of it, and, we've gotten so much rain for the past few years. I am so happy about that, I have been planting new trees for the past few years and I love to not have to haul a hose or a bucket to water them, and rain water is the best thing for them, NOT my public water with bleach and who knows what else in it. Later Guys.

  • HU-525254581

    Poaky, I have not sent the Magnolia yet for we have been in the 90s the last few days. Cooler today but warmer the next several days. I also have been very busy and hope to send them next week. Sorry for the delay.


    There may be a change of plans and I might not make it to Quartz mountain this fall. We are planning a trip to Maryland in October to visit my daughter who has relocated there from Springfield Missouri.


    While there we may take a side trip to Virginia beach and maybe collect acorns from the northern most populations of Virginia LO. They may not be any hardier than trees from Florida or Georgia but it would be worth a try. There should be a better chance though, it's usually better to try a plant from its northern most range or highest altitude.


    I can send you some of them if I go. Oklahoma is still possible to as well as from my trees. The acorns on mine are still growing now but are slow, hopefully they will ripen before colder weather.


    I will contact you when I send the Magnolia. Maybe I can wait till I get acorns so I can send them together.

  • poaky1

    HU, as far as ANY Q. Virginiana for me, save them for yourself, they won't make it here. As far as right at Virginia Beach I only saw 1 pitiful Live oak right where the beach is, BUT, of course there are surely many of them closeby. I saw a cemetary FULL of Live oaks on the drive away from the Virginia Beach area. I wanted to go and see them up close but my 2 trip mates were too busy argueing with each other to stop. There are many nice old Live oaks in the general area, look on the Virginia Big trees or champion trees in Virginia and some big and old ones are at a nearby Military base and not too far from the Beach area.

    No hurry on sending the S Mags, it may be best if you send them in October actually. It has remained pretty hot here into October lately, and the trees could fry in transit.

    I will be happy about any Q. Fusi acorns I can get. Later.

  • HU-525254581

    Yes Poaky, they might not make it but its a pictu cheap way to find out after all that's what experimenting is all about.


    The trees I'm talking about are a native population found at ,I believe, Ocean view park in Norfolk. It's probably hard to find native populations of anything on the commercialized beaches but I can't say, I've never been there.


    The trees are supposedly shorter and squatier than trees further south. Maybe they are Quercus virginiana v minima. Back in the 90s the area experienced the first below zero temperatures on record, down to- 3. Reports said any branches above the dune level had leaves froze but remained green below.


    Trees planted around town may or may not be from local trees. I think the northern most trees are actually on an island off the southern DelMarVa peninsula.

  • Jeremy in VA 6b

    HU,


    If you come to Virginia go to Bryan Park in Richmond, VA. This park was founded in 1910. The Live Oaks there are old enough to have survived a cold snap in 1940 of -12F. This is the most northern, mature, documented, Southern Live Oaks in the east, and is much further north than other Live Oaks in Virginia Beach or Williamsburg area. See this article from Harvard looking for a cold hardy Southern Live Oak. Harvard research for a cold hardy Southern Live Oak


    Another must is a visit to Fort Monroe in Hampton, VA. The Algernourne Oak their is approximately 450 years old and quite large.


    Poaky,


    I ordered two Q. Fusi from Lancaster last year. They grew nicely this summer. I'll try and get photos uploaded.

  • HU-525254581

    Thanks Jeremy, hopefully we can do all of this. Wonder what the provinence of the Richmond oaks, this matches the potential hardiness I've heard about, probably more northern trees.


    Protect them till they become established and who knows.


    I've tried Virginia LO but eventually they freeze to the ground here. These trees came from South Carolina but Virginia trees, maybe. At best though I expect a struggling shrub. I'll experiment.

  • Steve_NEAlabama_7a

    Hi poaky1,

    I purchased my current Quercus fusiformis tree from Oaks of the Wild West (sorry I had the name wrong in an earlier post); I’ll be obtaining two more Quartz Mtn Live oaks from Alligator Alley. All three Q fusiformis trees will be planted relatively near each other, so I’m hoping there will be no pollination issues with them. My pollination problem is likely going to be with my one 5 year old Compton oak tree. I only have one and it’s surrounded by wild Quercus alba and Quercus montana trees. I’m thinking about moving it this winter to a new spot nearer where the the Quercus fusiformis trees will all be located.

  • poaky1

    Hi guys, I am NOT going to even try ANY Q. Virginiana's. I am only going to try Q. Fusi's. I have 1 small 12-24 inch Fusi coming from Lancaster "go natives" nursery. I have some Fusi acorns coming (IF they can collect viable ones) from Sheffield's seeds. They have my name and they will sell them to me If they get some good acorns this year, Plus a couple or few guys on here. I THINK Joe is one, then HU and maybe Brian, my memory is crap, sorry guys. I am only trying Fusi's, Virginiana MAY hold on for several years especially IF I baby them in winter in the greenhouse, BUT, eventually there WILL be a winter that will kill it.


    Steve, is your TXLO from Oaks of the Wild west a single trunk, or shrub form? Mine was a multistemmed shrub form one. It died, I already told my story about that tree.


    The place in Lancaster called me since I kept missing them when I called, and the guy I spoke to said that these Fusi's were POSSIBLY from Quartz mountain. That is NOT a "yes" they are, BUT, he seemed to THINK they are. I will likely be able to tell after seeing it. I am expecting it before the weekend, he said it will ship out Monday, so, yeah, It SHOULD be here soon. He said that they wrap the roots in newspaper, wet newspaper, I am kinda hoping they kept some soil on the roots, it is STILL hot here, in the 90's the past 2 days, and likely NOT to cool off until maybe early NEXT week. The guy said that the seedlings are about 4-5 years old, so, I wonder HOW can they be in 1 gallon pots still? IF the tree is THAT old maybe I will NOT have to pot it and use the greenhouse to protect it after all. I will look at the trunk girth to see IF it can handle the winter here, maybe I should STILL pot it up for this winter?


    Steve that pollination thing is beyond my knowledge. It would be neat to see a Compton and Fusi hybrid tree though.


    Jeremy, that Algernourne oak IS on the site for Virginia Champion trees. I would have LOVED to go in search of the VERY old and huge live oaks in Virginia, BUT, there wasn't enough time to do all that when I had gone to Virginia last time, plus, my 2 trip mates were fighting with each other, and, I couldn't ask them to look for big Live oaks. I am kinda chicken to go on a trip myself to look for them, and I have NO car now, I wrecked my car this past June, so, I need to save up for another car anyway. To ask my friends to drive me around looking for big trees wouldn't be right. You know what I mean? Anyways, I have seen some nice big and old Live oaks on the Virginia champion trees site. When I had gone to Florida years ago, I hadn't seen a decent nice big Live oak, I had seen a couple that had sparse leaves and TOO much Spanish moss on them, it seemed to be killing the leaves, smothering them. I saw many Live oaks, BUT, they didn't look like some of them I've seen in pictures look. The Live oaks at Williamsburg, Va looked pretty short, i don't know how long they'd been growing there, BUT, they looked pretty short and definitely NOT super old. Even the Virginiana's that are further North than Williamsburg, Va would likley die in my yard. I am DONE trying Virginiana's. I had brought one from Florida to my yard several years ago. It had a nice trunk girth of about 1 1/2 inches, BUT, it died. Well, of course it would. I would but ,many folks have come here and said how a Virginiana stayed alive and grew "until the winter of -----" so, I don't want to waste time on them. Now in a zone 6b or 7a, I would try them.


    Jeremy, the oaks you got last year from Lancaster, how did you overwinter them in your zone 6b? Did you plant inground right away, or did you pot them and protect them some way, plus how big were they when you got them? I mean was the trunk a thin stick (whip) or were they a bit more mature, like a trunk girth of about an inch or so? I was trying to get details from the guy when he called me, BUT, he wasn't sure IF they were from Quartz mountain acorns or not, and he eventually said, I have MANY return calls to make, he wasn't mean, I just think that he didn't really KNOW the source of their acorns for sure, so, when I get my tree I will see IF they are QMLO or TXLO. My QMLO has MUCH different leaves and branch stiffness. Anyone who see's them can tell the difference.


    HU, IF those trees are on an island, they may be more North, BUT, that water around them is surely why they can make it that much further North, my guess. There are folks way up in Canada or BC (which MAY be the same thing) that are zone 7 and 8, I couldn't believe it until I saw their Youtube videos about all the plants they can grow that I cannot without protecting them with heated boxes. The Ocean REALLY helps with making a place much warmer than other places at the same degree North. There are people on Youtube that DO use heated boxes and wrap plants up and add heat etc. BUT these folks don't have to protect plants, they'll be a zone 8b and grow Palms etc with NO protection, it kinda pisses me off a bit out of envy. Later.

  • poaky1

    OH, BTW, I took a picture of my brother standing by my QMLO, and I still can't post pics BUT, when I can you'll see that the QMLO is about a foot or a bit MORE taller than my brother who is 6' 4".

  • Steve_NEAlabama_7a

    poaky,

    The Q. fusiformis that I obtained from Oaks of the Wild West was a single trunk tree. I've posted a photo of that tree in an earlier message above. They did tell me that the tree I purchased was from Texas. I planted it on a sandy loam slope that's rather dry during the summer and fall months. It's performed very well and has put on most of it's growth over the past two years. I've ordered a Quartz Mtn. Q. fusiformis from Alligator alley that will be planted about 40 feet away from my current fusi.

  • poaky1

    Sorry Steve, I hadn't realized that the pic was of YOUR TXLO from oaks of the wild west. I sometimes only check my emails 1 time a week, and may MISS some details, I am sorry. I should have caught that one. Alligator Alley has nice "Quartz mountain Live oaks". They are GOOD source to buy plants from. I had screwed up by insisting on getting a "partial refund" from them on a QMLO seedling that I had only reported to them after a full winter and a couple of months in spring. IF I hadn't waited those extra spring months they would have refunded me NO PROBLEM BUT, I had waited a couple of months too long, and so the guy at the nursery is mad at me, and maybe rightfully so. I have tried to order another QMLO BUT my order was cancelled and my money reimbursed to my account, so, in other words, I CAN'T order from them any more.

    ANYWAY, they send good little whips of a QMLO. I personally would protect the small little whips, until they get about 3/4 of an inch trunk diameter, maybe just a "pool noodle" will do in zone 6b. I hope that you post pics of the new QMLO from Alligator alley. Any new growth on any of your Fusi's next spring/summer.

    I will be trying out several fusi acorns and 1 Fusi seedling or whip from Lancaster, Pa that MAY or may NOT be a Quartz mountain sourced seedling. I love trying to see which Fusi's will be hardiest and also fast growing PLUS being zone 6a hardy. I am pretty much thinking that many Fusi's will NOT be TOO hardy, and the most hardy WILL be the QMLO trees.

  • poaky1

    BTW, since I NOW have a greenhouse, I can overwinter a small tree or "whip" of a TXLO and possibly have it eventually be planted in the ground. Anyhow, I will be able to post more about the Fusi I will be getting from Lancaster, Pa once I get it.

  • poaky1

    I am pretty sure that any Fusi witha trunk girth of 3/4 to 1 full inch would be fine in a zone 6a winter, as long as the winter lows aren't so extreme as to be beyond a "normal" low. Which would be -10F and most of our bad winters of late have been -8F at the worst, well, winter of 2013-2014 was a low of -3F. BUT< In my greenhouse I will protect the small trees until they do get at leasta 3/4 to 1 full inch trunk diameter. My current QMLO had about 3/4 to a full inch trunk diameter when I received it, and it did great in winter here. Thanks Joe, once again. I DO wonder IF I can get a regular Fusi to grow here though.

  • joeinmo 6b-7a

    Poaky, as to the acorns, I use a spray bottle every day on mine. More than likely the ones I send you will already be sprouting, if they are I would NOT trim the sprouts, just plant and don't let the pot freeze. They are not yet ready ..probably mid October.

  • Steve_NEAlabama_7a

    Do any of you know if any nurseries are raising Compton oaks from cuttings? In that way one would know what the tree received would basically look like when mature based on the source tree.

  • Steve_NEAlabama_7a

    I’ve decided this year, after my tree has grown larger, that my Compton oak exhibits far more traits like an Overcup rather than Live Oak (leaves, bark, limb structure). Is this true for most of you; or are you fortunate enough to have either a tree that exhibits equal traits of both species Or more Live Oak traits? I need to post a photo of my Compton oak on this site so you all can see it.; I’ll do that soon. I purchased my tree from Nativ Nurseries 4 or 5 years ago.

  • HU-525254581

    Hi Steve, of my 6 Comptons 3 lean towards LO and the other towards Overcup. All but one are very hardy but all survive. I've posted pictures of these before showing the variability of the trees.

  • Brian From MO.

    My two Compton’s I purchased last spring from nativ nurseries are heavy trait LO which I have pics on this thread as well.

  • Jeremy in VA 6b

    Poaky, my Fusi from Lancaster were about 1/2 in diameter last fall. I planted them in the ground and did not have any die back over this last winter. This year they grew about a foot. Of course I'm in a bit warmer climate down here.

    Steve, my Compton I planted from the Champion Compton Oak in Williamsburg and leans heavily towards LO. But as a guide told us visitors on a plant walk in Williamsburg: Offspring from the Champion Compton are not true Compton Oaks as they are actually a hybrid of a hybrid if that makes any sense. I'd plant a bunch of Comptons than pick the one you like best. Some oaks you can't clone I've heard. I have no idea if a Compton can be cloned. he clone to get would be of that Champion Compton in Williamsburg, in my opinion.

  • Steve_NEAlabama_7a

    Hi Jeremy,

    Thats my understanding of many of the Compton seedlings as well. If there are no Compton oak pollinators nearby the acorns are pollinated by nearby Overcup and/ or Live Oak trees. That process would either increase or reduce the amount of Live Oak DNA in a seedling based on the source tree of the pollen for each acorn. I wish that nurseries raised their Compton trees from cuttings because of that fact. I suspect that my own seedling tree might be 1/4 Live Oak at best.

  • poaky1

    Hey Guys, okay, I never knew that the Williamsburg, Va Compton oak was NOT a true Lyrata and Virginiana hybrid. I am kinda disappointed actually. Now, the Mossy oak natives nursery where I got MY Comp[ton's oak seedlings from have NOT really said that THEIR stock is anything BUT a true hybrid of Lyrata and Virginiana, SO, I am hoping that the Compton's you get if buying from THEM is a true hybrid of those 2 specific trees. MY Compton's all seem to have smaller leaves like a Live oak, BUT NOT too small as to be like a Live oak. I have 1 true Lyrata and it's leaves are larger than any of my Compton's. Only 1 of my Compton's has what I think is the most "beautiful" branching form, the branches are mostly all horizontal, and should be a really pretty form in a shade tree. How Mossy oak natives nursery would get a truly 50/50 hybrid of Virginiana and Lyrata would HAVE to be with having the 2 trees right next to each other OR hand pollinating and I am NOT sure even IF that is possible.


    Jeremy, I gave my credit card info to the guy that runs the "Go natives" nursery last week and have yet to get my tree. I am going to email them. I am guessing that it is still too hot to send it through the mail. I was a bit leery when I saw that you can't "check out" and pay on their website BUT, you said they sent YOU a tree etc so I am going by YOUR kinda vouching that they are a legitimate business and YOU got YOUR tree etc. I would say that MY tree will be MUCH smaller than the one YOU got. I got the smallest size the 1 gallon pot, BUT, the guy said it is a few years old at LEAST maybe MORE, I really forget how old he said it would be maybe even 4 years old. Now, if YOUR's grew 1 foot this growing season it MAY be a QMLO, the guy said that the tree IS from Oklahoma and is only found in a certain area, SO, IT MAY be a QMLO. I kinda HOPE that it IS a QMLO since they will do fine here once large enough. I STILL DO want to try a regular TXLO seedling also, once IT gets enough trunk girth I DO wonder how it would do here, since MY regular TXLO from "Oaks of the wild west" was multitrunked (shrub form) and those trunks were super thin, I have weeds growing that have thicker trunks or stems than THAT TXLO I got from "Oaks of the WW" it was my first TXLO and I didn't realize I should have sent it back and insisted on a single trunk TREE form Fusi, you live and learn.


    One of my Compton's oaks has surface roots that will likely soon be REALLY large and like the ones on many oaks or other trees that grow in swamps. They are really noticable now, but, still small, but, right on the spoil surface. It's in the lower yard where water collects after the rains and also the septic drains in that area. It's pretty neat. I WILL get pics to post one of these days. I will be using a fresh disk to try and take pics and then try and post the pics.


    Joe, the acorns you will send, I am sorry, BUT, are THEY TXLO OR QMLO? IF memory serves me well, they will be TXLO? Sorry again, I can't recall IF your QMLO has been producing acorns. BTW, IF the "Late drop" Live oak is still alive, how is it doing? Later Guys.

  • poaky1

    I have 1 new pic on the new disk and tried to post it here but NO success. The computer does not seem to know the disk is already in the slot you put it in. This is really getting on my nerves. I used to at least see that the disk was seen to be inserted into the computer, now, it says to "insert disk".

  • joeinmo 6b-7a

    Poaky, the acornS are QMLO

  • poaky1

    OKay Joe, I hope that YOU will have enough acorns to share a few with me. Later.

  • HU-525254581

    St.CSt.Clair county trees.



    Short leaf pine row.

    Short leaf and Loblolly pine.

  • Brian From MO.

    Good pics Mike. Hey what kind of trees in your first two pics? Btw, I got my Compton and Beadles oak trees from Bass Pecan, not nativ nurseries. I am very happy with my Bass Pecan hybrid Oaks.

  • HU-525254581

    TXLO, New Mexico form, same seed lot I gave you. These are TXLO all the way, no apparent hybridization. They were overgrown with grasses and a woody Lezpidiza. I finally cleaned the weeds out.

  • Brian From MO.

    Love to try more of your full line TXLO’s!

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