webuser_301478629

Can’t get people to work in house

Patty A
May 31, 2018
My parents have an older home. Over the years, they have had some financial difficulties. They have put a lot of money into the house but you wouldn’t know by looking at it. They did things like closing up a non functional closet in the kitchen and opening a new one on the other side, moving a bathroom out of the kitchen, knocking down walls in the kitchen, and remodeling all the bathrooms. They could never afford to remodel the kitchen, as they also have a chronically ill adult child they fully support financially.
I will be helping them (financially) to remodel the kitchen.
The problem is that my brother left after living there for two years and left a huge mess behind. A lot of his things are still packed up in the family room and while he was there, the family room, where he was staying, could not be maintained. The room now needs painting and some minor wall repairs.
In the entryway, the railing needs replacing.
A BIGGER problem is that the kitchen cabinets were repainted about 15 years ago and that paint is chipping off. The cabinets were never replaced in almost 40 years. The kitchen looks so bad that I cannot get anybody to come or call back after they see it. I guess they think if it looks like that, you can’t afford me. We need a kitchen designer and a contractor. What can I do?

Comments (233)

  • Patty A
    Medallion were priced for Gold line, at one store at around $17k. We wanted to be around $15k for cabinets. I don’t have the design withe me. My parents have it.
  • Helen

    Carolina - I didn't mean anyone could price someone else's kitchen on the internet but she is asking for all kinds of input regarding various finishes and what is the point of making suggestions if they aren't realistic within the total amount she wants to spend for the kitchen. At this point all anyone can say is that X lines are approximately the same or with respect to counters different surfaces are approximately $Z per square foot.

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  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler

    15K is not realistic for a true mid grade line, unless the kitchen is small, and you are skipping many of the Houzz must haves, like cabinets to the ceiling, all drawers, and finished end panels. Add 10K to that, and now you’re at an average expenditure for a fully designed mid grade space instead of a stripped down no features one.

  • Patty A
    Where are the Houzz “must haves?”
  • Patty A

    I need 25k for cabinets without countertops and install? It’s not worth it in this neighborhoos to spend over $30k just for cabinets.

  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler

    1/2” furniture board construction, not 3/8”, standard, no charge, not an upgrade. Blum or Grass level soft close drawers and doors, standard, no charge, not an upgrade. Lots of other standard construction details at that level, but those are the buzz words that the craptastic imports have picked up on in order to try to fool you into thinking their products are quality. It’s more than that, but that’s the basics.

    People also expect the paint upgrade, or upgrad d from oak wood upgrade. Full overlay doors upgrade, not partial overlay. Mostly drawers upgrade, not doors and drawers. Taller cabinets + compound stacked moldings to reach the 8’ ceiling, big upgrade. Not the wall stripe above that lets the uppers catch dust. Pull out trash upgrade, instead of it sitting there out in the open. Super Susan or Lemans swingout corners (depends on architecture) upgrade, and not gawdawful inaccessible blind corners. Exposed cabinets sides flushed flat upgrade (no skin), or done as an integral panel that matches the doors. No laminate sides with a non flush reveal. That is low grade.

    Double oven cabinets, pantry cabinet with roll outs or a pull out pantry, deep refrigerator cabinet with side panels to enclose the refrigerator, upgrades. Not a range, with a closet pantry, and the can never reach it 12” deep cabinet above the fridge, with no side panels.

    That is the 2020 consumer expectations for a mid grade kitchen these days. Not just new cabinets. It has to be designed correctly, to fulfill those expectations, or you’re wasting your money.

    I’m not counting the $4500-$6500 wood hood in that, because most mid grade budgets end up doing a stainless chimney hood or a Pro style under cabinet hood rather than break the 30K mark. Or they shift to a Cheapo cabinet line that’s more about looks than substance.

    Average mid grade kitchen redos are in the 55-70K range. Of course, you can spend less, and have a cheaper kitchen. That’s won’t get you all the everything 25K upgrades, and 8K of quartz counters, and 12K of appliances. A cheaper kitchen is lowering the quality level to 15K of a little bit better than builder grade cabinets, with 3K of basic Group A or B granite counters, and 6K of basic above apartment level appliances. And the lighting, flooring. Sink, faucet, painting, demolition, and all the rest that goes with doing a kitchen that you are forgetting about. You’re in the 35-55K range for that, unless you DIY everything. Labor is the largest component of anything.

    http://www.remodeling.hw.net/cost-vs-value/2018/

  • PRO
    Carolina Kitchen & Bath

    What is worth it in this neighborhood? Call a realtor and get his/her advice. You may also want to post photos of the kitchen because we have no idea of the size etc.

  • Missi (4b IA)

    How much is the house *worth*? What kind of shape is it in? For me, we paid 53k for ours, so 25k+ is the most ridiculous and asinine thing a person could do. We could, I assume, get more than we paid for the house should we put it on the market nowbut still-things are only worth what people are willing to buy them for. We completely gutted my brother's entire house down to the studs, new roof, new heating/ac, and he still sold it at a loss. We still owe 23k on our house for heavens sakes. You know? There's a whole new subdivision the city insisted was a "sure thing" and going to encourage community growth, *full* of empty $250k houses, bc they didn't pay attention (or listen) to the fact that our area is SOOOO NOT a $250k house area. The ones driving the Mercedes, BMW, Cadillac, Land Rover vehicles are the lawyers, Dr's, etc. My husband drives a 15 year old Ram truck and the vast majority of the people who live here are Chevy/Ford/minivan drivers. They're not putting in 50k kitchens. All those things need to be taken into consideration too.

  • Patty A
    It’s an old neighborhood. The neighbors recently got $270k and they had mdf cabinets, one garage, a basement and 4 bedrooms. My parents have 2.5/3 bathrooms (powder room has a shower), 3 bedrooms plus an office, one garage. The lot is large but that really doesn’t make a difference. The neighborhood has turned over and a lot of young first time owners are moving in. However, buying things that aren’t going to function after a year is a waste of money.
  • kazmom

    Sophie - your numbers seem high, and that is coming from someone who lives in a moderately high COL area and just finished a kitchen remodel using a good quality GC and decent mid grade materials. My kitchen is a 17’x11’ L with a 9’ island. I had quartzite quoted for my kitchen for less than $8k. I had no interest in quartz, I think it looks like plastic, so I don’t know what it would have cost, but I had 3 granites and 2 quartzites quoted and none were above $5.5k. I did spend about $6k on my appliances but only because I got the Bosch Benchmark induction slide in range, a counter depth fridge (floor model, so saved a little) and a microwave drawer. My dishwasher was a mid level Bosch and the hood a stainless chimney. I don’t think those qualify as “just above apartment grade”. You could easily outfit decent appliances for less than $6k. I know you want people to be realistic but there is a HUGE range of products out there, enough that most people can find what they want within a reasonable price range.

  • ssewalk1

    Thanks Missi , for shedding some Common Sense ! Seriously Partti A You could have freshed up old kitchen with less time that you have wasted on this thread ! What are you creating a Martha Stewart Kitchen . What a Soap Opera , get your hands dirty and demo the cupboards repair the water damage and get some paint . There are 100,s of handy man types or qualified trades personnel in unemployment lines who would love this type of Reno work . Who needs a Interior Designer , This ain't Hollywood Girly !

  • Cole Man

    15 grand will buy a nice set of cabinets. These "PROs" who are telling you to add 10 grand, or whatever, are used to dealing with people who have more money than sense, and they have obviously become very proficient at parting them with it.

  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler

    A 270K house should have a kitchen remodel budget of 54K, slightly less than the national average expenditure. 40% of that, +- should go to cabinets, or 21K. Quartz counters, at an average $100 a square plus cutouts will be 6500 for an average sized 60 square foot kitchen counters. Bigger is more, obviously. The grand total is up to 27,500.

    Demolition, dust control, final cleaning, debris haul away and dump fees, 2K. Floor prep, and new tile floors, and installation, 4K. Backsplash, $1500. Rough electrical to bring to current code and add needed lighting, including under cabinet, with the lights, 3K, which is probably low. Plumbing to hook up new sink, faucet, disposal, and dishwasher, with all new supply lines, drain lines, and angle stops, with all materials (less DW) 2K. Up to 40K.

    Fridge, 2K, double wall oven 2.5K, cooktop, 1K, DW 1K. MW $100 for on the counter or $500 for a built in (which adds more to the cabinet totals too) Less than 400 CFM decorative chimney hood, non import, 1K. All consumer grade appliances, and assuming some sales are found. Installs $500, being low. 8K total. 48K total now.

    Drywall repair from electrical and demo, plus painting all walls, ceiling, and trim, plus millwork for new shoe molding, and piecing in the crown interface from the cabinet crown to the room crown, 2K. Which is low, to darn low.

    We’re at 50K in a 54K budget. That only leaves 4K for the GC, which isn’t realistic. That should be more like 10K, or 20%. So, we’re up to 60K, and over budget by 6K.

    Maybe that 6K is made up by sticking with a range instead of a wall oven and cooktop, as that would lower the appliance and cabinet budget both. Or maybe the quartz gets canned in favor of granite. Or a cheaper floor tile, or one that isn’t a large format is chosen. Or maybe a cheaper backsplash, but that’s mostly labor, and not materials already.

    The reality is that the OP’s list upthread is full of beyond mid level I-wants. And hard choices have to be made. You can’t have everything you want at the level you want it unless you have unlimited funds, and don’t care about resale.

    You can do a perfectly fine less than mid grade quality remodel for less money. But what you can’t do is think that this is Lake Woebegone and everyone is spending at average levels, even when spending well below the national average. That’s not how it works. You have to accept that if you want to spend less, you will end up with lesser quality. Or you will end up DIYing a significant portion of the labor. Which has its own personal and lost opportunity costs.

    Magic high quality cabinets at low builder prices does not exist. Or any other material. Or service. The good trades are not cheap.

    Figure out what quality level you are willing to accept, and budget accordingly. If your budget trumps all, and it dictates lower quality, accept that. It’s likely appropriate to your surrounding neighborhood., instead of your aspirational idealization of the neighborhood. That is what the % of home value formula does. It keeps you from over spending or under spending.

  • PRO
    Kristin Petro Interiors, Inc.

    Nobody has even seen a plan for this kitchen, so therefore, nobody can speculate on the cost of the cabinets for this particular home. For a rough estimate on very good quality cabinetry (all plywood, good hardware, roll-out shelves, etc.), estimate $1K/cabinet, no matter the size of the cabinet (the larger/smaller cabinets average out). So 10 cabinets = $10K. If you want lesser quality cabinets with fewer upgrades, bring the price down to $800/cabinet. This should give you the range you need to budget for the cabinets.

  • Helen

    FWIW, 20% of a home's value for a kitchen remodel is on the extremely high end for recommendations. Exceptions would be for a a fixer in a pricey neighborhood. Almost all recommendations I have seen are between 5% and 15% - and with some attention paid to the kinds of kitchens in the neighborhood so advice is to ask a realtor.

    I don't know where "average" prices come from - what is the median price being paid for kitchen remodels.

    Of course it's unrealistic to look at a kitchen in Architectural Digest and think it can (or should) be replicated in a "normal" kitchen. Most sane people realize that "aspirational" or "inspiration" means just that.

    No doubt kitchen remodels cost money - especially if one is paying for labor from reputable tradespeople but I also think one can get a great looking functional kitchen on far less by compromising in areas that don't sacrifice functionality for the most part.

  • Patty A
    I can tell you that $50k+ kitchens are the exception not the rule in this neighborhood. Plus, most people in homes of this price, are not calculating to make sure the remodel is a certain percentage of a home’s value. That’s ridiculous.
    When you deal with people with unlimited funds, as it seems the pros in this site do, they have that luxury. However, most people I know don’t calculate remodels the way they calculate tips.
    Some things can’t go strictly by the book. I think very wealthy people have a difficult time grasping the idea hat money does not spontaneously materialize just because the numbers on a piece of paper say it should.
    As I mentioned a couple of times already, the kitchen in the most recently sold home, had mdf cabinetry with no frills and it sold easily. These people are not reading Better Homes and Architectural Digest. I seriously doubt that if somebody walked into a house in this area and, heaven forbid, saw cabinets on the bottom instead of drawers, they’d break into a hissy fit and walk out.
    My parents need functional cabinets with hardware that will last. I thought design was supposed to be a creative endeavor. I realize there are trends but to live and die by checklists and decimal points is too anal for my taste. What happens if you’ve calculated exactly 40% but your cabinets didn’t add up? Do you put a cabinet on the ceiling just to come in at the right number?
    Plus, the neighbors are not going to snicker behind my parents’ backs because their refrigerator isn’t flush with the cabinets or the molding isn’t in fashion. I think everybody needs a dose of middle class reality.
  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler

    In a medium cost area of living, where $1 buys $1, 10% of a home’s value for a refresher where you keep the cabinets, but make other changes, is a perfectly realistic budget. As is 20% for an all paid labor full remodel with new cabinets, but without structural elements.

    In a HCOL, it would be ludicrous to say that a 1M teardown shack in San Francisco would need a 200K kitchen. It’d need a whole lot more than that, spread around the whole.

    And in a LCOL, where a home’s value isn’t even 100K, it’s impossible to do a 10K with paid labor. This is where the % will be greater than the 20%, because there is a certain basement to costs when using paid labor. Even just the materials will be more than that 10%, unless you’re a landlord in Section 8 housing buying used off Craigslist. That “must have” list gets significantly downgraded.

    A 20K kitchen, with basic inexpensive stock cabinets, standard laminate counters, sheet vinyl floors, and basic entry level appliances, with DIY painting and penny pinching is a realistic budget as well, for an entry level home. With adjusted expectations.

    But that is not a kitchen that the middle of the road home renovator would do. Because it would be a downgrade of what has become middle class expectations. I outlined those expectations above. Those are not “upper end” details. That list is much longer and more complex.

    If you are doing a renovation with resale in mind, you need to understand what buyers expect in a kitchen advertised as “newly renovated”. Otherwise, you’re flushing the money down the toilet twice when they start deducting the cost of a full remodel from their offers. They expect move in ready, with all of the things they see on TV. They expect that 63K remodel.

    And you do too, because you’ve expressed wanting all of the elements of that level project, but just aren’t willing to pay the price. This leads right back to the original reason you posted, and why you can’t find anyone to work with you. Your expectations do not align with a workable renovation budget for your wants. You need to downgrade the level of your wants, or upgrade your budget.

  • PRO
    Kristin Petro Interiors, Inc.

    You’re correct, Patty. Designers often have a higher expectation of cost because our clients generally expect a higher level of quality and customization. The average cost of our typical kitchen remodel is $100k, including appliances (about $30k-$40k of the budget). Does that mean you HAVE to spend that much? Of course not! We’ve also designed for significantly lower budgets. But many of the professional photos on Houzz that are routinely referenced in these threads cost at least that much. So I think it’s important to try to align design expectations with the reality of appropriate budgets.

    I always say that design starts with a budget. So start by figuring out what you want to spend. When you start getting quotes for appliances and cabinets, and when combined with your labor bid, you’ll figure out pretty quickly if the budget you set is sufficient for the quality and look you want.

  • raee_gw zone 5b-6a Ohio

    PattyA, several people have mentioned that we don't know the size or layout of the kitchen in question. Without that information it is impossible to make much in the way of recommendation.

    That said, you have at least told us that you are willing to spend $15k on cabinets (just the cabinets, right? Installation is separate?). And it sounds like the neighborhood is mid range. Do you have a number for the entire project in mind? You really need to, and then you (and your mother) can just focus on what fits that budget. That makes decisions a lot easier.

    I am not a designer or salesperson, just someone who researched a lot before redoing my kitchen, and I would have been confident in installing Shrock, KraftMaid, or Diamond mid quality cabinets. I didn't because I wanted frameless (Euro-style) cabinets for my small space, and that wasn't offered in those lines. I had talked with a local home store designer and worked up a design with Diamond cabinets (before I decided to go frameless) and we had found some ways to cut the expense even in that line. I was convinced that these brands will not fall apart in a year, or even 20. Just don't get particleboard!

    I do agree with Sophie to look for USA manufactured (not just USA assembled). Or do what I did, find a local cabinetmaker to make them for you. It was no more expensive than Kraftmaid or Diamond would have been.

    Do think about using lower drawers for the plates etc, assuming you have the space to do that, then you don't have to worry about getting deeper uppers and your mother will find that it is easier on her too.

    Basic levels of granite are not high maintenance (nor are they radioactive -- if that were true, every county courthouse and older bank building in the nation would be hazardous). Corian is a solid and attractive option, quartz is a little nicer maybe. Just figure out how much you want to pay for counters and pick one of the 3 in that price range -- they all have limitations and advantages but I doubt that she'd be unhappy with any of them.

    Look, my home is in an older (70ish years) neighborhood of smaller "starter" homes that sell for $200-$300k ( prices are higher because of the suburb, location, local amenities, not because of the homes themselves). I redid my smaller kitchen with a contractor -- new cabinets built by a cabinetmaker, wall repair, granite counter, refinished floor, mildly rearranged layout, new window, lighting, outlets, all new appliances -- for approx. $17k. I knew what I could spend and chose everything based on that, and I think I have a nice, functional, much improved and pretty kitchen!

  • Cole Man

    The MO of fast-talking con-artists is to get the potential client to cough up an amount that they're willing to spend, I.e. their "budget", and then get the project up to, or over, that number. That ain't the way business is supposed to work. How it works is you give potential customers the price points for different grades of product, and then they decide what they want. That's how it works in every other business.

  • Gill

    I agree with Sophie and with Raee. My experience with kitchen renovation costs is very close to Sophie's description. We didn't consider our kitchen "mid-grade" because we got everything we wanted (i.e. the things on Sophie's list). We didn't want a wooden hood or wall-ovens. We got 3/4 inch plywood boxes because we are in this house for the long haul, God willing, and 15 year old particle board boxes with doors hanging off were a lot to put up with before the reno.

    HOWEVER, the hinges didn't start coming out for 7-8 years, and until then the cabinets looked and functioned great. My point is that cheaper thermofoil cabinets with particle board boxes are going to look good and function properly for 7 years+ so if you are doing this for a time frame of 5 years, there's no need to overspend on cabinets. I know this because we had them!

    If you save on box structure and doors, you can spend the money you save getting the functional upgrades that would make your parents' lives nicer, like lower drawers, LeMans corners, a trash and recycling pull-out, a quiet dishwasher and fridge that holds everything and provides easy access. Those are literally the things that make us happy every day and they were not cheap.

    You can also save money by not changing the whole layout and not going to the ceiling (we did go to the ceiling and moved little used items like Christmas glasses, and cheese dome up there, but mostly we put decorative things behind glass panels, so functionally it didn't make much difference).

    When I see you saying you don't want things falling apart in a year, you are imagining some kind of doomsday scenario that I don't think exists. You don't have to go mid grade to get things that last longer than a year. There is a reason there are different budget lines and it is not to rob people; it is to allow people to get something nice looking that they can afford, and the trade-off is that it won't last as long, but it WILL function and look nice for 7 years.

  • kazmom

    Do some research on plywood vs particleboard. I did and from what I found on here and other sites, as well as talking to people I know who do woodworking and build furniture and such for a hobby, I would have bought particle board boxes from a GOOD brand (Diamond, Medallion) without a second thought. People can trash them if they want, but if you do some searches you will find MANY people, including pro’s on this site and others, who will tell you particle board boxes from a good brand will hold up just as well as plywood and that they wouldn’t spend the extra for plywood. In the end the brand we went with plywood was the only option, but had I done Diamond or Medallion I wouldn’t have paid the upcharge for it.

  • J Kay
    If you hire a designer they will have contractor contacts. I would finish cleaning everything you can out or into storage and then hire a seasoned designer. Good luck to you!
  • Patty A

    “Go to ceiling.” What exactly are you all talking about?

    pictures would help

  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler

    Yes, pictures would help. Post some. Post your plan too.

  • dan1888

    Here's the link for 24" deep Ikea base cabinets with three full extension soft close drawers. An example is with wood effect dark brown box with the Ekestad oak veneer flat particle board drawer fronts trimmed in solid ash so it won't chip. A 36" wide lower is $427. unassembled. A 24" is $334. 30" is $379. Too bad we don't get the light oak version offered in Europe. It's only in metric sizes with a larger toe kick space. The boxes can be white with other drawer fronts.

    Here's the box without anything. 36" wide 24" deep is $57. . . .Forvara low drawer is $32 with the slides to fit a 36x24" base. You supply the drawer front. So $153 plus the cost of 3 drawer fronts. You also need a $6 or so leg kit. Soft close here as Maximera at $49. So $204.

  • PRO
    Carolina Kitchen & Bath

    Go to the ceiling means the cabinets (with or without crown molding) go all the way to the ceiling. In a kitchen with an 8' ceiling it makes sense, when you get into a 9' or 10' ceiling it begins to get really expensive.

  • Patty A
    Ikea cabinets are all RTA? Are they assembled with the same plastic dowls and bolts and their other furniture?
  • Patty A
    My parents have soffets in the kitchen anyway. So, the cabinets have to go the ceiling no matter what.
  • Patty A
    Now, can somebody clarify what the proper molding is? Sophie mentioned one kind but not another.
  • Helen

    Don't get wrapped up in the details

    Chances are with soffits, you need standard height cabinets with standard moldings - i.e. if you look at most standard kitchen cabinets, there is a bit of molding at the top to give it a finished look. More expensive kitchens have wider molding which of course is more expensive.

    It really doesn't seem as if your parents need or want a "designer" kitchen or that it would particularly make economic sense in their neighborhood.

    It really is unnecessary to spend $54,000 (even with labor) to get a long last attractive functioning kitchen.

    Kraftmade is an excellent line for your needs and it appears to be more or less in your budget. Other items such as appliances, counters, faucets, backsplash flooring can all be obtained within a normal middle class budget that is within your budget and those would be attractive, functional and durable. Cabinets are probably the most expensive aspect of any remodel. You probably do not want to go with IKEA since the savings are not that significant unless you are planning to assemble them yourselves and the choices are more limited.


  • PRO
    The Cook's Kitchen

    Most people are removing the soffits when they only have a 96” ceiling.

    Before:

    Light and Bright in Collierville · More Info

    After:

    Light and Bright in Collierville · More Info

    See the removed soffits, and now the taller cabinets plus two piece moldings to the ceiling give additional storage, and no place to catch dust.

    Light and Bright in Collierville · More Info

    Super Susan corner, tray base, and pot and pan drawer. Look at the increase in counter space, storage space, and greater usability compared to the Before.

    This is why people remodel kitchens.

    Same with the other side of the kitchen.

    Before:

    Light and Bright in Collierville · More Info

    After:

    Light and Bright in Collierville · More Info
    Notice the wall cabinets to the left of the window. Before was difficult to access, because of how they were hinged. It opened back to you, in your way. After, created a left hinges cabinet easily accessible from the kitchen side of the peninsula, and the right hinges cabinet easily accessed from the breakfast area of the peninsula.

    Light and Bright in Collierville · More Info
    More drawer bases for accessible storage, another Super Susan, a pull out trash, and the bead board that wraps the peninsula.


    Light and Bright in Collierville · More Info

    Before:

    Light and Bright in Collierville · More Info
    Also notice the old 12x12 tile with the wide grout, and the new 12x24 tile with narrow grout.

    After:

    Light and Bright in Collierville · More Info
    Display space, a spot for the TV that doesn’t impact the counter, and a hidden wine fridge. Notice how the crown is the same profile, both in the gray and in the white, and wraps all the way around the room smoothly.
    Light and Bright in Collierville · More Info
    The granite is on the lower cost end of the spectrum, and ties the wine area to the kitchen.

  • Patty A

    What kind/brand of cabinet and what type of countertop? Will there also be a kitchen table or will the peninsula suffice?

  • Patty A

    Removing soffits is not an option here because of venting.

  • PRO
    Carolina Kitchen & Bath

    Patty, why can't you post pictures or dimensions?

  • PRO
    The Cook's Kitchen

    Another Before and After where the soffits with both wiring and HVAC were removed for taller cabinets and crown molding. And a better layout. Removing soffits is not a big deal. It is done on almost every project that has them.

    Before:

    East Memphis Family Kitchen · More Info

    After: More lights, including under cabinet lighting.

    East Memphis Family Kitchen · More Info

    Before:

    East Memphis Family Kitchen · More Info

    We removed part of this wall to open to the family room.

    After:

    Wall gone!

    East Memphis Family Kitchen · More Info
    Drawer storage, pull out trash, encased refrigerator, wall oven cabinet, glass display.
    East Memphis Family Kitchen · More Info

    East Memphis Family Kitchen · More Info
    Compound crown molding.

    This is why people remodel their kitchens! More storage, better layouts, and more light.

  • dan1888

    Patty- Here's a vid on base cab assembly for Ikea.


    Here's the pdf of Ikea options to look over.-https://www.ikea.com/ms/en_US/img/buying_guides/fy18/SEKTION_cabinets_August.pdf

  • Patty A
    We’re trying to keep costs down, so extra construction probably isn’t a good idea.
  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler

    This horse is going to keel over entirely from dehydration, right beside a big beautiful pond.

    Hire a good KD. Listen to them. Use their recommended contractor.

    The biggie is listening to the expert. Earplugs just isn’t conducive to listening. You could have already had everything on order, and scheduled for install at the end of August. Instead, you refused to listen, or take any advice. And you are still spinning your wheels. And will still be spinning the wheels in another two months. Because you won’t listen and learn.

  • Patty A
    It seems like a lot of people have earplugs in their ears on this forum. We can’t afford the extra construction, regardless of what a designer says may be the right thing to do. I don’t see why taller cabinets are better, when it’s harder to reach the top shelf.

    We don’t have any real KDs our area anyway. KD is not the right route if he/she is going to make unrealistic suggestions.
  • wiscokid

    Patty, can you please post photos of the space and a floor plan, along with your desired budget?

  • Patty A
    I’m not going to post pics of the actual kitchen it’s in a terrible state. The cabinets are in very bad shape. I saw a post on the forums from somebody in our area. It looks like the same layout as my parents’ kitchen. It may have been the same hime builder, since it appears to be a nearby town.
    I know the same builder unfortunately did a lot construction in these areas. I’ll check my parents’ dimensions and the post that I saw here.
  • wiscokid

    Okay, but a floor plan would be very helpful - even a rough paper sketch.

  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler

    You have zero idea of what is realistic and what isn't. Because you have not found anyone willing to work with you, to even give a basic price. And no one here knows what is doable or isn’t because you won’t take advantage of this forum’s greatest strength.

    Post the layout. In a separate post. Post your general location and budget desired. You will get concrete suggestions instead of generalities.

    Otherwise give up posting entirely. You’re not getting anywhere, because you won’t share enough information. And you’re combative and resistant to absorbing any advice at all.

  • PRO
    Carolina Kitchen & Bath

    Patty, no one will be able to help you until you post some basic measurements at least for us to look at. It's not about ears, it's about eyeballs. Talk to you later when you've got some measurements up.

  • H202

    I have been reading this thread with amusement for several days. Why anyone is even responding at this point is beyond me. Everyone is just talking past each other, with absolutely no hard information about the kitchen at hand.

  • Patty A
    Somebody drew on the original sketch. I have to make a new one.
  • Patty A

    *adversity.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    Fair enough. I do spend too much time here.

  • ssewalk1

    Handimac , Very sound advice . I personally have done the same for my Garage Man Cave ! Recycled my old kitchen cabinets for various item storage , looked so good the Wife had me make my own cabinets within my tiki hot tub enclosure .

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