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mrsqnbee

I agree with your comments regarding Guinea Fowl. I have seven and end up cussing at them most of the time. Ha! They are LOUD. They can fly high into the trees and over homes. Their preferred food is cat food. They are a nuisance in a neighborhood. If they are raised in a fully enclosed run some of these challenges could be met, but they probably would not be very happy. They are extremely smart and can evade most predators so they would be great in a semi-wild area with tall trees to roost in. They do lay eggs, but only during a short season of the year in nests that are very well concealed. They are good parents that can successfully raise a batch of keets on their own. My opinion is that these birds are only great for a very small and specific set of conditions.

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cameliamit

Using the Gardening Budget Planning template helps you manage your money and have a great garden. The file is designed to plan and keep track of spending while offering an opportunity to log all relevant plant details that otherwise might be lost.

https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/273963890

   
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dallasannie

I live in the burbs and I am not opposed to the keeping of a limited number of small farm animals, such as chickens, as long as there is considerable keeping done.

But, that photo shoot of the wanna' be farm inclosure is absurd. What? One goat, one duck and one chicken? That is almost like decorative animal keeping.

Animals that are kept in small enclosures need a lot of keeping and cleaning in the burbs in small backyards. Many who live on large plots of land and keep animals will keep them somewhat away from the house.

Keep a few chickens? Yes. But,not a small "farm" in a pen alongside the house. That is not a good thing for people or for animals. Sure, in some parts of the world people and their livestock practically , or literally, live in close quarters alongside each other. But, that is not the structure of life in the American burbs.

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