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catfred33

quartzite advice. The counter is staining!!!!

catfred33
2 years ago
To anyone who has quartzite or know about it

We had Tahiti quartzite installed in our kitchen. We have been in our house for about seven months. The countertop started to cloud around the sink and edges. Our fabricator came and said it was water and it would disappear. The problem is it is getting worse.

Has any one had a similar problem? How did you deal with it?is there a special sealer we can request be applied.

I hope there is a solution as this looks awful. Help!

Comments (306)

  • dezedarin
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    False, Diresco brand quartz from Belgium has been selling quartz made from plant based resins for years which can be used outside. Casaerstone has released three colors or so that can be used outside also. You seem unexposed.

    Your ad hominem was specific, towards all in the stone trade, "stoners", a negative connotation that we, me included, are dumb pot smoking idiots. Or whatever it means to you, clearly meant as a put down. Also a deviation from the the original tread topic, meant to distract from your weak argument. Clearly your Houzz life is a critical part of your social life.

    The stains are not only on mitered edges. As the majority of pics above attest to.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    2 months ago

    Diresco is "much more resistant to UV rays" which hardly constitutes "UV proof". Notice how Caesarstone's outdoor palate is decidedly muted; they aren't going to put any dark colors outside. Should I have stuck a "most" qualifier in front of my statement? Fair enough.


    Any stone fabricator who failed to due the research necessary to avoid adhesive and silicone bleed deserves to be equated to a pot smoking stoner.

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  • Cait B
    last month

    @ssalierno did the oil-ex work for your son? I’m giving that a shot on my counters tonight.

  • Dora d'Amato
    last month

    @Cait B did the oil-ex work? I am desparately trying to find a fix

  • Lina Draper
    last month

    I had gorgeous honed Calactta Quartzite countertops with an ogee edge installed seven years ago and it was perfect when it first went in. Gradually after about 6 months all the edges started having this bleeding dark staining, worst part close to the right hand of the stove and very bad all around the sink area. Lighter staining has happened all around the island even the over hang. The extra piece from the sink cutout which I had made into a cutting board and have never used even has this staining all around it. I have tried every kind of poultice I could find including acetone and nothing has worked. I have read everything I could find on this until I found this thread and now am more confused than ever. All this is too technical for me. My kitchen is small but has a good size island. Seven years ago this thing cost $11,000. Can anyone tell me if there is any hope that this can be fixed.


  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    last month

    I don't know how the stoners can sleep at night selling this crap.


    I was just at a home with the new buyer to look at his blown reinforcement rod. He contacted a local fabricator to get pricing on replacement. The fabricator he contacted was the original fabricator; they had his address on file. I can't imagine quoting a replacement for a job that I fabricated years earlier that had blown up.

  • Lina Draper
    last month

    Just another thought, does anyone think that this countertop above

    can be re-honed and then maybe left to see if the moisture will come out of it and then be resealed ??? Just a question.

  • karin_mt
    last month

    Hi Lina! Yes, that's a reasonable idea. Can you reach out to the shop that fabricated your countertop to ask for their input? They may have seen it on other slabs of that same stone they've installed, and so they may have some practice in treating it.


    The bottom line is that with your slabs, it's likely that moisture is getting into the stone from the cut edges. It seems that either the fabricators weren't diligent enough in sealing the slab edges, or, the nature of the edge (being vertical and small) makes it hard for enough sealer to really sink into the stone.


    It's a tough problem and I feel your pain. I hope you can get some good, local advice. Let me know if I can help.

  • kudzu9
    last month

    Lina-

    That's a very troubling, though not uncommon, problem. Unfortunately, I think that having it re-honed to make the problem go away is wishful thinking. I'm not a professional stone person, but I've been rehabbing for decades and am dubious that there is a permanent fix for this. Maybe Joseph Corlett, or one of the other knowledgeable professionals here, will weigh in on re-honing...I'd be happy to find out I'm wrong.

  • karin_mt
    last month

    Re-honing would remove the sealer, which could help the moisture evaporate. And it may open up the pores in the surface of the stone, which could also help. But those are hypothetical statements. It's the kind of thing I'd like to test.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    last month

    Re-honing isn't going to be done cost effectively, so whether it works or not is irrelevant. The cure can't be more expensive than replacement. With non-bleeding Corian of course.

  • marylut
    last month

    Can stone countertop discoloration be from 1] wiping off counter with too much soapy water that collects at the edges? 2] silicone with too much plasticizer content that seeps up through the porous stone? 3] sealant used that is not recommended for the absorbency level of the stone? 4] stone is not properly sealed? 5] cleaning product ingredient is removing the sealant and allowing water from counter wipe down to seep in? 6] damage from local “hard” water?

  • Lina Draper
    last month
    • I saw the fabricators seal everything when they installed the counters and they looked like they were doing a pretty good job. As far as all around the island I only ever used a damp cloth and dried as I went along, never using any soap or other cleaner. As I mentioned even the cutting board that I have never used has staining around all the edges. I think from what I hear on this board the water or moisture may have been pushed into the stone when it was being cut, got sealed immediately when it was installed and then took several months for the stain to appear because the moisture was trapped by the sealer. Re-honing can't possibly cost more than the $11,000 cost of the counters not to mention the fairly expensive backsplash tile installed afterwards. Replacing it does not sound like an option. I suppose I might try to have the cutting board re-honed and let it sit for a while and see if anything happens. Below is a photo of the island edges (sorry for the 2 pics) and below that is a photo of the counter just after the tiles were installed and it was perfect. We don't have kids here so there are no messes being made. I am a picky Virgo and this just drives me nuts..




  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    last month

    Take a Bernz-O-Matic to those edges please; not a heat gun. Certainly won't hurt anything and might fix it in minutes.

  • Donna Bercovitch
    last month

    I have had my quartzite for over 4 years.. looks like the day I bought it..never had a stain like this.

  • karin_mt
    last month

    It won't take months for the stain to appear, I don't think that can be true. When I test quartzites for porosity, water moves through them within minutes, not months. This is only true of the more porous ones like White Macaubus, Infinity White, and similar.


    But not all quartzites are porous and not all of them stain. That's why this is such a tricky problem.

  • Lina Draper
    last month

    I will certainly look into the Bernz-O-Matic. Thank you.

    It is absolutely true that all the edges were perfect when the counters were installed in April 2014 and the staining started lightly around Christmas. It just gradually got worse and then really bad around the sink and and one side of the stove area in the last 2 years.The island staining did not start until much later and it is only this past year that it is spreading although not as dark as other areas. This is a photo from Nov 2014 and they were all still ok then.



  • PRO
    Stoneshine
    last month

    These quartzite issues are very confusing for anyone that has had this occur Pro or consumer.

    While am aware there are multiple possibilities that can be attributed to the staining. In Lina's case I would tend to think a silicone bleed is the cause of the issue. Getting gradually worse over the amount of time Lina states sounds like a bleed. After testing with a torch I would hire a bona fide stone pro (restoration ) . He can try some poultices that are more suited for bleeds. Products like dicone gel number 9 from prosoco and or mineral spirits. These can be used as a poultice in a testing mode on a small area. I don't think its possible for water to migrate thru quartzite over that amount of time. The fact that this is happening (in this case) slowly seems to point to something other than moisture. We network with a good amount of stone refinishers. If you want to send me an email I may be able to refer someone to you.

  • ssalierno
    last month

    This is terrible. I have designers telling me now to install Quartzite and they know nothing about this problem. Why isn't it more publicized?

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    last month

    The staining is bad enough, but the industry’s response is what’s reprehensible. Not the first time either. There are hundreds of thousands of failed reinforcement rods and rarely are they fixed or replaced by the original fabricator. The Stone Fabricators Alliance probably wouldn’t dump you nor would the Natural Stone Institute for failing to fix either.

  • Chessie
    last month
    last modified: last month

    ssalierno, I have to think that the majority of folks that get quartzite don't have the issue, otherwise the popularity of quartzite would have faded considerably. Of course it might just be that the marketing folks are doing a bang-up job of promoting this stuff. The only thing I can say for sure, is that those that are considering materials for a new counter, REALLY need to do their research. If they spend any time here on HOUZZ, they will become well aware of the problem. I was looking at quartzite myself and after reading through many of the complaints, I decided it was not worth taking the chance, but that is just me. Others may feel that the beauty of some of those stones are just completely worth the risk. SO many posters here blast the "woo hoo wow it's NATURAL" mantra that make you feel that to make a different (albeit wiser) choice is simply inelegant, to put it mildly. One is wiser to ignore them, and do their own research. I chose Viatera quartz, and even then did testing on it before the final decision. I have been very happy with my choice.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    last month

    More than 30 years ago DuPont decertified all its fabricators. The only way you could get your certification back was to go to Corian school and have a showroom with a full time salesperson. You can't buy sheets without a certification. They lost half their fabricators, but their warranty claims decreased by 80%. The guys that stayed had half as much competition.


    It was business brilliance on DuPont's part; it probably saved the brand. I've documented here how Silestone will sell slabs to anyone with a saw and a truck and Cambria sold sheets to a fabricator that will certainly self-destruct if someone isn't killed or injured first. I gave Cambria the address; whether or not they did anything is unknown.


    If major manufacturers can be this irresponsible, you can imagine the foolishness in the wild west that is the natural stone industry. Sell slabs, sell slabs, sell slabs. Get them to fall in love. Inappropriate stone for countertops? Slap some mesh on the back and get 'er out the door. This would have been death for DuPont, but hard and shiny continuously gets a pass in the marketplace.

  • Kimberly Farwell
    last month

    I have white LUX counters. Same as above - staining around the whole edge. Counters went in right before quarantine. Fabricator wouldn't come back because of lock down and then when he did come back six months later, said it was water - now staining has gotten worse and he won't stand behind it. I have tried many different poultice and just REGRET putting QUARTZITE in. Lux is white and there's this discoloring in different places around the sink (not the edge) and NEAR the Viking range. I actually had clear plexiglass cut to go on both sides of the range so I didn't have to worry about oil stains or anything more to make it look bad. I'm in my late 50's - kids are out of the house/out of college, AND i'm not a cook, so if I was in my child rearing years and at the sink/cooking every night I think I would be so upset over all of this. The other thing is insurance paid for this - because I had a flood in my kitchen and when my insurance company came in to replace a cabinet, they broke my granite and had to replace the counter. I replaced my granite with quartzite. BIG MISTAKE. It looked pretty, but it's only 1.5 years old and it's a huge headache and a huge disappointment.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    last month

    I’d start an unrelenting shaming campaign against the fabricator. You start taking out a couple customers and he’ll do the math and figure replacement is less expensive a loss.

  • Sa Mog
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I am looking to do full slab backsplash and matching countertop. I am debating between porcelain with marble look or Onda Argento quartzite. I am worried reading the reviews on quartzite as I will be using a large amount of it. I was quoted $24,000 for Onda Argento by one one fabricator, and $16,000 for the same material with another. Can anyone offer any explanation for this, and any recommendation on a preferred countertop material? I prefer the natural look but want durability with a young family. I am so torn as everything seems to have it's pros and cons.


  • Shannon Ellis
    last month

    Joseph Corlett, hi, we are just picking out our countertops for our kitchen now and I am trying to research the difference slabs we liked. Any advice on these stones, viscount white granite, extreme white/pitaya granite, white silk quartzite, white pearl quartzite, padda white (which looks like a stain waiting to happen to me). We got the quotes so I know the prices vary greatly. My question is about durability/staining. Any advice would be wonderful, thank

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    last month
    last modified: last month

    SaMog...do your homework and determine if it really is quartzite. a lot of stone places label it as such but it it's really marble. ask if you can have a tiny piece of a leftover to test.

    take a glass tile w/you. quartzite will scratch glass. Marble will turn to powder. (glass is harder than marble)


    You might try looking at porcelain. they have some beautiful porcelain slabs on the market that look like marble

    this is a calacatta porcelain at my stone place. the slab cost is $2300.



    porcelain that resembles quartzite.


    this one is quartz


  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Shannon. Quartzite, true quartzite, will not stain or etch. (and there is no such thing as a 'partial quartzite', or "it has quartzite in it". It either is or it isn't)

    Most granites will hold up very well and won't stain. some of the whiter ones may have some staining issues, it just depends. Marble is, well, marble!

    Panda White is marble.


    They do make a Panda-look in Porcelain. this is two book matched porcelain slabs.


    Viscount White is granite (also sold as Silver Cloud)


    White Silk is something new. haven't seen that. looks like a type of macaubas

    white macaubas. true quartzite.


    White Lux quartzite. supposedly labeled as quartzite.



    White Pearl (if it's related to Sea Pearl, it's one of the true quartzites)

    this one is Sea Pearl. has greenish tones to it


    Pitaya White (never heard that name!) looks similar to River White Granite except it has black dots instead of maroon dots.


    True Quartzite will not stain or etch. you will have to do a test to see if it's real quartzite. stone places love to pass off marble as granite or quartzite. do the glass scratch test and the lemon test.

    with the white granites, you will have to seal every few years. Should be fine. White based granites can sometimes stain, but should be ok if you're good w/the sealer and don't let anything red sit too long.

    Infinity quartztie. I love this one if you like the black and white look


  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    29 days ago

    Beth H:


    Karin Kirk, a geologist, disagrees with you.


    "Porosity

    Quartzite has a range of porosities. Some, like Taj Mahal or Sea Pearl, have been highly metamorphosed, and the minerals are bonded together tightly. White Macaubas and Calacatta Macaubas have been exposed to less intense pressure, so they are more porous and will benefit from sealing."

  • Lina Draper
    29 days ago

    Beth H:

    Really??? True Quartzite will not stain or etch. you will have to do a test to see if it's real quartzite. stone places love to pass off marble as granite or quartzite. do the glass scratch test and the lemon test.

    Some of us unfortunate homeowners have done all of the research and testing and are absolutely sure we bought Quartzite. True Quartzite does stain and etch. Unfortunately who knew not sealing the entire counter under, above and all around could lead to all this staining that is going on. It's no wonder everyone is confused reading stuff like this.


  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    29 days ago
    last modified: 27 days ago

    @Lina Draper

    True Quartzite does stain and etch.

    No it doesn't. You don't have quartzite if it's etching. you have marble. (depending on the type of quartzite, some are more porous and could stain if not treated w/a good sealer. even some types of granite can stain) Back to etching,,,,

    quartzite is very hard and resistant to acidic properties. Karin MT is a geologist that often comments on these posts.

    https://usenaturalstone.org/definitive-guide-quartzite/

    The paragraphs in italics are copied from her info on quartzite. (the bold sentences are yours, Lina)

    Resistance to acids

    Quartzite will not etch from acids like lemon juice or vinegar. If a rock labeled as quartzite becomes etched from acid, then it’s been mislabeled. Marble and dolomitic marble, on the other hand, will etch from these acids. Dolomitic marble etches slightly more slowly than regular marble. But quartzite will not etch at all from normal kitchen acids. Not one little bit!

    Some of us unfortunate homeowners have done all of the research and testing and are absolutely sure we bought Quartzite.

    How are you absolutely sure? How are you ABSOLUTELY sure you have quartzite and not marble? What test did you do?

    Some quartzite is the real deal, but sometimes marble or dolomitic marble are labeled as quartzite. Because each of these stones behaves differently, people might understandably conclude that quartzite is variable. But it isn’t; quartzite has very consistent properties. Unfortunately it has variable labeling.

    does your stone scratch easily w/a knife blade? you can try it on the edge of your slab in the stone yard. avoid any resin or mesh. does it turn to powder when you scratch it? it's not quartzite. Try it on the face on the far edge of the border. marble will easily turn to powder. if it's quartzite, the blade will barely make a scratch on the surface.


    It's no wonder everyone is confused reading stuff like this.

    Reading what stuff? The truth? sorry it's confusing.

    The reason people get so confused is because of stone yards and their blatant mislabeling of their slabs. They aren't geologists. They're in the business to sell rock. If it's pretty and people like it, they'll mislabel so that customers will buy it. Whether or not they do this deliberately or ignorantly is up for debate.

    You ever hear of 'soft or hard quartzite'? no such thing. quartzite is hard. harder than granite. falls in the 7-8 region on the Mohs scale. granite is a 7, marble is a 3. If a stone yard is selling you a 'soft quartzite', they're selling you marble. Plain and simiple,

    Yes it's confusing for people like you you who believe the places that sell these slabs. Stone places changes names of slabs all the time. YOu may see a slab called A at one place, B at another place, and C and yet another place. And one place may label it as granite, one marble and the other quartzite.

    For years Super White was labeled as a quartzite or often a granite. It's 100% Dolomite. You ever hear of it? marble's cousin. Of course the stone places don't tell you that. Not my fault. I just try and post things on here to try to help people understand what they buy.

    Quartzite is a metamorphic rock made almost entirely of the mineral quartz.

    Marble is a metamorphic rock composed of recrystallized carbonate minerals, most commonly calcite or dolomite.

    There is only one kind of quartzite and it's hard. A rock labeled as soft quartzite is most likely marble.Quartzite will not etch from acids like lemon juice or vinegar. ... Marble and dolomitic marble, on the other hand, will etch from these acids.

    As for sealing, you don't seal under, whatever that means. You seal the top.

    Sealing doesn't make the stone stain-proof.

    Sealing gives you time to wipe off the stain before it sets.

    Sealing does nothing to prevent etching. Etching is what happens to calcite.

    According to the Marble Institute of America some quartzite etches because in slab preparation, resins are infused into the slab that enhance slab stability and make it shine. But when acidic liquids – wine, tomatoes, citrus, etc. – aren’t wiped up immediately, you’re left with a ghosted etch mark. Etching can also occur when cleaners that contain hydrofluoric acid are used. The resins are used before it gets to the distributor/fabricator so it’s not a “local” treatment.


  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    29 days ago

    Beth:


    You're ignoring the porosity issue. Sure, quartzite is hard; big deal. Hardness and porosity are two different things. If you don't test for porosity, you are setting yourself up for silicone or adhesive bleed as thread after thread here demonstrates.


    If you're in love with a porous quartzite, you'd better not laminate an edge build-up to it and you'd better find a way to gasket between the sink flange and the stone bottom that won't bleed. I'd get a silde-in range also, to avoid cooking grease between the range and the edge of the top.

  • Shannon Ellis
    29 days ago

    Thank you everyone for the responses Joseph Corlett, thank you, no where had a read that because the stone the quartzite is hard doesn't mean it's not absorbant. Does granite tend to be less absorbant then quartzite? With proper sealing is it a better choice? Of course the granite I like is light, white pitaya/extreme white and a lighter slab of viscount white. Thank you for your help everyone, while I would love a beautiful stone countertop function outweighs aesthetic.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    29 days ago
    last modified: 29 days ago

    Shannon, read this. it's from karin mt who frequently comments here. she's a geologist.

    https://usenaturalstone.org/definitive-guide-quartzite/

    Porosity

    Quartzite has a range of porosities. Some, like Taj Mahal or Sea Pearl, have been highly metamorphosed, and the minerals are bonded together tightly. White Macaubas and Calacatta Macaubas have been exposed to less intense pressure, so they are more porous and will benefit from sealing.

    https://usenaturalstone.org/caring-for-quartzite-countertops/?utm_source=related-articles/

    joseph, I get that. but I'm not talking about that issue. (i was merely talking about topical stains and etching. 100%, quartzite won't etch. Lina says True Quartzite does etch. I said it can't, since it's made of quartz. chemical impossiblity.

    when I talked about not staining, it was in comparison to marble. Even granite can stain, but with a proper sealer, it gives you plenty of time to wipe and clean. A stain can sit over night and still won't penetrate. But marble is something different. even with a sealer, you going to get stains if you're not quick w/the clean up. marble is so soft and so porous, it's difficult for things not to get absorbed.

    I get that certain types of quartzite have different porosities, but even those compared to marble are night and day. If you treat quartzite and marble with a sealer, spill a glas of red wine, and let it sit for say, an hour, which one to you think will be worse for wear? For sure the marble is going to stain. The quartzite, might not. some of the whiter quartzites are naturally more porous, I understand, but they still aren't going to stain like the marble. The sealers will do a far better job assisting the quartzite porosity than the marble one.

    The adhesive bleed is something else. Stone Yards continually mislabel these slabs. quartzite is almost 100% quartz. nothing else. So if someone gets a slab that's comprised of other minerals, then they don't have quartzite. do you get bleed through w/granite? granite and quartzite are two diff types of rocks, but similar hardness. if you get a quartzite that has crystal patches in it, it's not quartzite. You'll prob get bleed through on quartzites such as the macaubas than you would one like Taj Majal. that type of quartzite is extremely dense.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    28 days ago

    "Does granite tend to be less absorbant then quartzite?"


    That's too broad a statement. Just like quartzite, there are varying degrees or porosity in granite. If I ruled the world, Kashmir White granite would not be allowed to be used as a countertop material. It's a sponge, even after it's sealed. On the other hand, there are granites so dense that they won't accept a sealer.

  • karin_mt
    27 days ago

    Quartzite can definitely stain, but it depends on the particular type of quartzite.


    Quartzite does not etch.


    It's not accurate to lump those two traits together for any stone, because staining and etching are a result of totally different properties of the stone. One does not beget the other.


    It is confusing, and I understand the frustration. But I'm encouraged by the fact that good information is now widely available, and many dealers are putting in the work to learn. The trick for consumers is to learn it yourself, and then find a dealer/fabricator/designer who has done the same.


    That Candy's Dirt blog that Beth posted is wrong. I wrote to them and urged them to correct it, but they didn't respond.


    How are people supposed to sort fact from fiction? I get it. It's hard to do. Same can be said for almost any topic these days, because misinformation has become its own industry.


    Hang in there, everyone! We will all keep learning and sharing what we know, and ultimately that benefits all of us.

  • Chessie
    27 days ago

    "That Candy's Dirt blog that Beth posted is wrong. I wrote to them and urged them to correct it, but they didn't respond."


    I read that years ago and realized they were posting incorrect information after all the research I did. I wish they would remove it or correct it. It's frustrating for people to read all the BS out there and make a good decision.

  • karin_mt
    27 days ago

    Agree 100%!

  • HU-891276262
    7 days ago

    I am SO confused about countertops! We are replacing our over 20 year old granite that still looks pretty darn good - just dated and going to lower the island to one level rather than 2. I am always drawn to natural stone and found some "cristallo" quartzite slabs that I am in love with. I can't bear the thought of running into problems down the road. We will be replacing our sink with a large single bowl copper farmhouse sink. Can anyone please make suggestions on what I can do to make sure I won't have staining or etching problems?! I'm not completely against porcelain but have read about a lot of chipping problems with those. Help!

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    6 days ago

    "Can anyone please make suggestions on what I can do to make sure I won't have staining or etching problems?!"


    Test for porosity and to see if it's real quartzite in person.

  • HU-891276262
    6 days ago

    Thank you Joseph! I will ask to test a corner. Do you have a preferred substance to test with? Red wine? Vinegar? So if it’s real quartzite should I not be concerned with future staining like some of the above pictures around sinks? Thank you so very much!

  • dezedarin
    6 days ago

    Shouldn't have much problems with Cristallo. Thats a pretty dense less pourous crystaline quartzite. That beauty and quality usually matches the price. One of my favorites.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    6 days ago

    HU;


    Google around for the proper tests please.

  • Chessie
    6 days ago

    I would disagree that Cristallo would not have any issues. I myself tested a slab and it was unacceptable. As Joseph says above - do your tests!

  • HU-891276262
    6 days ago

    Thank you Chessie! Can I ask what you tested with and how long you let it sit? I have red wine, vinegar, mustard, and soy sauce ready. Did you test with a nail or something to test for scratching?

  • Chessie
    6 days ago

    I tested with lemon juice and a piece of glass. Both tests failed.

  • dezedarin
    5 days ago

    Doesnt sound like Cristallo I have worked with. Minimal wicking after cutting, not enough calcite to etch with just lemons, and harder than #7 when tested with hardness files. But always do your own test, for who knows what they are actually trying to sell.

  • Donna Bercovitch
    5 days ago

    hu-891276262, I have had my quartzite for over 5 years, no etching, no stains , I entertain a lot.. lemons,vinegar ,wine have all been spilled on it..I love it.. I have never sealed it looks brand new ..love it..

  • HU-891276262
    5 days ago

    Donna- thank you SO much! Absolutely beautiful! I spoke to the stone supplier again yesterday and they are going to give me a very small hunk to test. I’m looking at a copper workstation sink and induction cooktop for the remodel. Is that induction that you have? Your kitchen is beautiful! Love your backsplash too!

  • Donna Bercovitch
    5 days ago

    HU… thank u so much ..yes the stove is induction..so easy to clean and use.. u have to get use to things heating very fast.. water boils seems like seconds..the backsplash is like a wavy subway tile..and u wrote u are getting a copper sink ..I love it too. Just remember it does change colour cause it is copper. I use copper cleaner.. cleans in seconds., if u want to keep it as a pretty penny..enjoy your new kitchen..☺️