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Any washers use tap hot water?

cmamcon5
February 7, 2019

I would really like the option of a hot wash without having to run a 2.5 hour sanitize cycle. My heavy cycle runs 1.5 but only gets to about 110 degrees. Most of my stuff is smaller loads and not that dirty, but I would like to washsome of them in hot. My short cycle is 32 minutes but choosing hot on it gets me a temp of about 84 :( (Samsung Front Loader) I've just figured this out and it's really disappointing! lol

I've been looking at the 500 and 600 series Electrolux but I know their short cycles only allow warm... and they are really short. Also looking at LG 3770? I've had a front loader for about 7 years and not sure if I'd like to go back to top load, so a front loader with a true hot option would be great.


Does the commercial Maytag have tap hot? I see it only has limited water levels though... Any suggestions for a common older washer that would compare to the Maytag and be easy to find used?

Any advice appreciated!


Comments (19)

  • dadoes

    This is a tricky issue. The only way to know for sure is via feedback from a user of a given model who has investigated his/her machine's characteristics. Part of the trick is that operating firmware on the control boards may be updated during production without notice.

    Frontloaders' and HE toploaders' reduced water usage compared to non-HE toploaders complicates the issue because a considerable "degree" of heat is lost to the mass of the machine and clothes so there's a substantial immediate drop in temperature of water in the tub vs. the incoming tap-hot. This is why frontloaders with onboard heaters for a Heavy Duty, Allergen, or Sanitary cycle come into play.

    An old-style WP or KM direct-drive toploader (with agitator) is likely to run tap-hot for Hot (although warm may be controlled). They're common on the used/resale market but of course you "takes your chances" on the condition.

    cmamcon5 thanked dadoes
  • simmtalker

    If you mean this Maytag commercial top loader, I have one. It does have the option of running hot water into a regular wash cycle.

    This washer is small compared to many new models, so not sure how your "small loads" will fit into it. The "deep fill" cycles use full water, and the "normal" cycle is about half water. I use the deep fill cycles for clothing, bath towels, bedding, and anything like that, but the half water normal cycle works great for dish towels (I don't have that many LOL!) or other very small loads.

    cmamcon5 thanked simmtalker
  • cmamcon5

    simmtalker, that is the one I’m thinking about, we have a local appliance store with a scratch/dent/return warehouse that I’m watching for a good deal. Thanks for the real life review. They have the Maytag for $750, I didn’t check to see if the had any cheaper ones.


    dadoes, thanks for the input. My mother has my old Whirpool from around 2001, if I could find one of them used I would grab it. my kitchen tap measures about 138 degrees so it’d be nice to get sonething better than lukewarm. I just got an Electrolux dryer so I may go ahead with my plans to bit a matching washer and stack them. Then I could get a used older top loader and add to the room. I’m watching for a bargain at the warehouse place so not in a rush.


    They had a set of the older Speed Queens last weekend but I didn’t look too close, I think the washer was 700-800$ something ( still a little pricey for me)





  • SEA SEA

    That is a good price for pre-2018 Speed Queen. I have a 2016 SQ TL. I think I paid $750-799, I can't remember exactly how much anymore. Anyhow, in my opinion, and experience with mine, it's worth that much money. Much higher price, I'd say not. It's not a unicorn after all, and it is rudimentary. But getting full tap hot and good wash action, definitely worth what your local store is asking--if it's pre-2018.

  • dadoes

    Also an angle to consider .... majority of mechanical parts are still available for the WP/KM DD machines, so an enterprising DIYer could completely rebuild one for long-term use.


  • cmamcon5

    SEA SEA, it was a AWN model, so I think it was 2017.... They had all the 2018 models too. They are only open on Friday, Saturday, Sunday so if I'm in town this weekend I'm going to go browse.

  • cmamcon5

    dadoes, my mom just broke the lid latch somehow on the Whirlpool, she said she was having to slam it to get it to work. The repair guy came and fixed it in five minutes. She was worried it wouldn't be fixable since it was "so old". I told her they fix much older ones! We've did some small repairs and replaced heating elements in our dryers so I feel kinda semi-confident we could work on something... There's a place that sells refurbed washers I should probably check out. I think they offer a one or two month guarantee, not much but better than Craigslist/Facebook.

  • SEA SEA

    My SQ is the AWN 432 version. Dials, not electronics. 2017 was last production year where things were great in SQland. No personal experience with the electronic controls, but I've read owners were happy with those as well.

  • Larisa Batchelor

    I have a Maytag front loader. When I select extra hot it gives me true hot water from my water heater. It’s set at 140. Was super shocked it did it but very happy. The sanitize mode on this machine is 1 hour 40 min so not bad either.

  • dadoes

    I recently rebuilt a 1999 KM that was given to me years ago by a friend, who was going to trash it for a $12 part. It sat in my garage for 5+ years. I refurbed it at that point, my mother used it for 6 years. It developed a couple problems so I pulled it and swapped in another rebuild for her, and fully rebuilt the KM including new tub support, bearings and spin drive, changed a couple parts in the transmission and fresh oil. It ought to be good for another 20 years of use assuming the timer or motor doesn't fail (which is reasonably uncommon on the whole). I have it for sale but as yet no takers. I'll either keep it until some other family member needs a machine, or maybe offer it with a 1-year warranty.

  • SEA SEA

    If you live within a day's drive of Dadoes, you might want to buy his rebuilt KM. Heck, if I lived within a day's drive and had a truck, I'd take it if I had a garage to store it in!

  • kaseki

    The few-years-old (but electronic control) Speed Queen FL that I have has 'hot' available for all wash cycles, but all rinse cycles are performed cold. I could just re-plumb it leaving hot on the 'hot' connection and some tempered value of temperature on the 'cold' connection. (My hot is close to 120F.)

    Another option is to use the minimal number of 'cold' rinses and run a soap-less hot or warm second wash cycle.

  • cmamcon5

    Larisa, what model is your Matag?

  • Larisa Batchelor

    The 5500 series. A hometown sears closed out and got them for a steal.

  • mamapinky0

    Simm, you say your washer has the option to run hot, but is it straight up hot tap or dubbed down hot? Thank you.

  • simmtalker

    Mama -- I'm sorry, I really don't know if it uses any cold, or not. Because the water quits running when the lid is up, and it does not mix water (meaning if "warm" is selected it runs straight cold then straight hot to make warm, it does not mix the two), I'm not sure if it gives a shot of cold water during the fill at any point.

    One thing I am sure of is, it is NOT straight hot if the "normal" cycle is used, because that's the "efficient" option. I have read others that say on the deep fill power wash and bulky cycles it is all, straight hot, but I never verified this myself.

  • dadoes

    SimmTalker,

    A simple method to run the machine with the lid open if you want to directly check the temperatures .... remove the latch part from the edge of the lid and place it down into the lock mechanism. Two screws involved, I think they may be Torx so you'd need to buy a Torx screwdriver of the correct size (or a set of multiple sizes can be had) if you don't have one.

    Replace the latch back into the lid when done checking. Or, you can leave it "tricked" to facilitate checking cycle operation whenever you wish ... the machine may require the latch be pulled from the lock after a cycle for it to confirm the lid has been opened before it'll run

  • simmtalker

    SimmTalker,

    A simple method to run the machine with the lid open if you want to
    directly check the temperatures .... remove the latch part from the edge
    of the lid and place it down into the lock mechanism. Two screws
    involved, I think they may be Torx so you'd need to buy a Torx
    screwdriver of the correct size (or a set of multiple sizes can be had)
    if you don't have one.

    Replace the latch back into the lid when done checking. Or, you can
    leave it "tricked" to facilitate checking cycle operation whenever you
    wish ... the machine may require the latch be pulled from the lock after
    a cycle for it to confirm the lid has been opened before it'll run

    I had thought of doing that when I first bought it last year (because it was annoying the heck out of me), but hated messing with a brand new washer. But.....it really shouldn't hurt anything, and would make it much more user friendly.....I may just do that :)

  • dadoes

    Another option is purchase a spare latch assembly from a parts vendor (many sources online) ... then you can trick it whenever you want without dealing with disassembly and the lock otherwise works as designed for safety purposes.

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