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jamie_outlaw

Veggie Tales - April 2019 (The Official One)

Jamie
April 1, 2019

Ok ... so I should not start threads so early in the morning when I haven't woken up fully. Apologies to the VT regulars for the confusion!


Happy April, All!

Comments (413)

  • PRO
    Len NW 7a

    Hardening off onions and shallots and prepped bed for them today. My bok choy and Chinese broccoli sprouts did not sure when pricked out so will plan to plant them out sooner rather than later.

  • Jamie

    Thanks, Len. It’s going to be a bit of a rush to get these planted. We will have rain on Wednesday and Thursday and possibly Friday. I might have to rush things and plant them on Wednesday afternoon. Its not supposed to rain a lot until Wednesday night. Since we won’t have harsh sun on Thursday or Friday, I think they’ll be ok if we rush them.

    We have had over 6” of rain for April, so far. The normal average for the whole month is about 5.5”

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

    Kevin - Amazing is right! Good luck getting rid of the wabbit! Hope everything survived the cold shot last night. Did you catch the culprit on your trail cam that's dumping their trash bags on your garden? hahaha

    Jamie - are those moisture crystals the same thing used on MG moisture control potting soil? I sure didn't like that stuff when I used it in a salad table planter. It started to smell pretty bad after a few weeks. I imagine the crystals might work well to take care of the drying out issue you're having. Nice tomato jungle you have there!

    Most of my tomato seedlings that I started March 23 are in the 3-4" tall range except the dwarfs that are an inch or 2 shorter. Cherries started a week later are about the size of the dwarfs now but they will catch up to the rest quickly.

    Rain is expected here on Wednesday night and Thursday am. Possibly severe they say. My garden could use it since it's been a week since it rained last.

    I'm trying to figure out the best way to harden off my tomatoes and peppers with the planned 3 day fishing trip on 4/25. I will probably just wait until I get back on Sunday and rush it a bit so I can plant out the following weekend.

  • Richard Teague

    Kevin you always give us something to aspire towards. Jack it is supposed to rain here Thursday but they said we were getting a huge flood last Saturday and Sunday so I put out my weed killer and lawn food so I wouldn't have to use the sprinkler and it didn't rain a drop. I already have to water every day and in summer maybe twice a day. I am super happy when it stays below 90 which isn't very often.


    The only seeds that I couldn't get to sprout this year were the Bloody Butcher and Big Beef but I still have over 60 varieties of tomatoes, so I think I will be okay lol. The peppers are having a much harder time this year maybe the varieties I am growing this year are just more sensitive to heat

  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA

    Here’s a better picture of the BCS and the hillside it was able to terrace - it’s about 25% or 14 degrees. Also a couple guys happy to have been taking a break lol.


    Have plans to run terraces on a good bit of the property and plant trees / perennials on the back sides. We get torrrential washout of the road down in the bottom so anything to break up the path of water should help.






  • Jamie

    Jack- they probably are the same things. I think I've used the MG moisture control potting soil, but it's been so long that I don't remember noticing an odor or anything. I'll let you know if it happens with these.

  • Richard Teague






    Fish Pepper




    Albino Bull Pepper






    Sweet corn in flat and 3 inch containers




    Sweet corn direct sow



  • Jamie

    Everything looks nice, Richard!

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

    Looking good Richard. You'll be harvesting tomatoes very soon. I'd plant out that corn ASAP. You don't want the tap root to get stunted in that flat.

  • Richard Teague

    Jack, I was just comparing how it grew under lights-on the roof-and normal direct sow. I wonder if corn would grow with about 4 hours of light a day-I have room on the shady side of the house

  • itsmce (zone 6b, Kansas)

    Len mentioned soil temp of only 54 degrees, I guess too low for beans. That brings a couple questions for me: How deeply do you measure the soil temp? What is an acceptable temp for beans? My trigger for bean planting is when the lilacs bloom here. I have a lilac bush that is very close to blooming. Last year I had terrible luck getting beans to sprout. Maybe I need to look at something other than lilacs blooming!

  • Jamie

    I measure the temp around 6"-8" or so, I guess. Sometimes a little deeper. I had never sown beans that early before (usually I wait until after the 15th of April) but at the suggestion of the Extension office, I decided to try some early ones this year. Mine are in containers though and not in the ground.

  • Jamie

    I was curious about the temperature also, and a few sites I found online say a soil temperature around 70-75 degrees for good bean germination. One said that the optimal temperature is 80 degrees. I've never had issues with bean germination this time of the year though in my beds. I'll see what the temperature is when I get home this afternoon.

    Here is one reference: http://sacmg.ucanr.edu/files/164220.pdf

  • itsmce (zone 6b, Kansas)

    Thanks, Jamie. Interesting!

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

    Dark seeded beans will germinate in cooler soil than lighter seed. Provider is a dark seeded variety and will germinate well in soil in the upper 60s.

    I measure my soil temperature at 4" depth because that's as deep as my soil thermometer will go.

    I may try to sow my beans the middle of next week if the soil gets near 70. My raised beds warm up much faster than the native soil. The air temps should be fine and I'd like to take advantage of string of days with rain chances in the forecast.

  • prairiemoon2 z6 MA

    I was just going to ask about Provider, which I bought this year, for that specific reason - germinates in cooler soil. I'm going to try that this week, after I figure out what the soil temp is. My peas are just up about an inch after sowing them on the 25th of March in 40 degree soil. It would be interesting to have beans and peas growing at the same time. We also have more rain forecast at the end of the week. So maybe I should check the soil temp today.

    edit: I just checked my soil temps - 55 and almost 60 - that's it. Guess I'll be waiting another week at least.

  • htwo82

    hey guys, would you pot up these tomatoes? The roots are coming out the bottom. I do have bigger pots, but I'll be planting them out in 2 weeks.

  • PRO
    Len NW 7a

    It has been a long cold winter here in Western Washington. Please don't tell DW that I use her instant thermometer from kitchen for soil temp. It goes in about 4" and is very accurate. I waited forever this year to put out pea starts until it finally got up to 40 degrees...they are thriving as is the overwintered Kale & spinach. Finally have a few days in the low 60's here.





    Heather I probably would not for pot up for 2 weeks. Do you bury most of the stem when you plant? Could you put them out earlier with cover?


    Prairiemoon I grow provider every year but start the first batch indoors in toilet paper tubes about May 1 and plant out as soon as they have 2 true leaves, then sow another crop in 2 weeks. To tell the truth I think they all come in about the same time! Definitely the earliest beans for us. This year I'm growing lots of heirloom pole beans that are new to me and have no idea what to expect since most came from other parts of the country. I'll be saving seeds from the ones that do best.

  • htwo82
    I think I'm going to leave them unless they start to show signs of unhappiness. I'll plant at least half of the stem when planting.
  • Jamie

    We had a busy evening. I got the supports put up for some pole beans and planted two varieties - Hill Family Greasy and Turkey Craw (both as part of the UT Home Garden Variety Trials). I also planted a row of Greek Runner Beans, trombocinio squash, spaghetti squash, Honeycrisp mini butternut squash, yellow straightneck squash, fordhook zucchini, ronde de nice zucchini (a round variety), delicata squash, another variety of zucchini that I can’t remember at the moment, and some north Georgia candy roaster winter squash. We also got the rest of the peppers transplanted - bullnose, ausilio, yellow jalapeño, and sweet chocolate.

    Most of the squash and the runner beans are in the straw bales that we got started a few weeks ago.

    oh- romanesco fennel, dragon tongue beans, and blue lake bush beans

    Tomorrow is tomato and cucumber day!

    i also transplanted some cannas and coleus plants that I had started from seed and sowed some cactus dahlias and “violet” zinnias. And- transplanted a banana tree we bought this past Saturday. It’s a Musa basjoo that’s hardy up to Zone 7a. I had one that was about 10 or 12 ft. tall at my old house but wasn’t able to transplant it.

  • Jamie

    Heather, I think that’s what I would do as long as they aren’t suffering. I let mine get too big - well I started them too early. Live and learn.

  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA

    Heather - Id vote not to pot up since your only two weeks out. You could pull the root ball out and see if the roots are wrapping around the outside of the pot to double check, but id still probably not pot up.

    Keep them a Little cooler, a little on the drier side and some shade (if they are outside) to slow them down.

    Im always struggling with tomato plants too large because I planted them too early. This year I actually did a good job and waited 2 extra weeks but the better nursery conditions and better potting mix (promix with organic fert added) Had them going gangbusters so I’m in the same boat. I’m probably going to pot up the biggest plants for the seedling sale into 1/2 gallon pots and sell them for $5-6. Most All of my garden plants will be going in the ground in the next week or two so they are going to just have to hang tight for now.




    Jamie thanked Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA
  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

    Kevin - I meant to ask you about the quality/size of the Debruyn asparagus crowns...were you satisfied/happy? Tomato seedlings that are crowded tend to grow taller much faster than they do if they are spread out more and don't have to compete for light. Obviously with the quantity you are growing, spreading them out isn't really an option. I only have 70 or so tomatoes and was able to spread them out with 8 per flat after my brother took his broccoli and lettuce home. I'm giving away about 2 dozen tomatoes and peppers tomorrow and more over the weekend so I'll be able to spread mine out even further for the last week or so under the lights.

    $5 per plant is a nice price! When are you planning the plant sale?

    Jamie - you got more done in the garden yesterday evening than I do over a weekend! It sounds like you'll have lots of squash and beans this year.

    Len - your peas are looking great! Do you usually stay cool enough into June that they don't stop producing? I've pretty much given up on peas because about the time they start really producing it either gets too hot for them or powdery mildew gets them.

    Jamie thanked LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
  • itsmce (zone 6b, Kansas)

    Regarding peas and powdery mildew...Last year, for the first time, I tried to fight it. At the first sign (or before) I sprayed my peas with copper. I think it helped to extend the season. Can’t do anything about the Kansas heat, but I will fight the mildew battle again this year. We had peas out of the freezer for dinner last night. My favorite! I side dressed my peas and potatoes last night with 13-13-13. We’re expecting rain (with storms) today.

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

    Margi - I never tried fungicide on peas before. Not sure why. I always had my peas (snow peas) growing on a trellis not far from where I had cucumbers trellised. I was always worried that the mildew would spread to the cukes so I'd pull the peas to prevent that.

    I love fresh peas too! I told myself to plant some for a fall harvest last year but never did it due to the heat/drought we had. Maybe this year I'll find some room for them. I'll have to remember to buy some snap pea seed next time I go to Planter's seed and spice. They sell them in bulk bins.

    I gave my potatoes some Texas Vegetable Food last weekend. The Kennebec and Red Norland are growing fast but the Yukon are a little bit behind. Somehow the Yukon will catch up, surpass, and be ready to dig a couple weeks earlier. I may delay harvest a little this year since I won't need the 2 beds until late July for carrots and fall beans.

  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA

    Jack - Yes I wish I could spread the mater's out but I need to conserve as much space as possible so its 18 to a tray for now. Waiting on my order from Greenhouse Megastore for the 1/2 gallon containers and will need to go and buy another couple bales of Promix. Also will need to print new labels out. Not exactly the way we planned it but hey you gotta adjust right? Plants that size are sold for $6 to $8 in big box stores so I think it should be giving people a good deal at $5.


    Plant sale will be May 5th and May 11th. I am also bringing a bunch of plants into work the week between - we had a real good response from coworkers buying plants last year and a lot of people asking about it. I just set the plants in the back of the truck and go out to the parking lot at lunch and after work to meet people who want them.


    The Debruyn asparagus crowns were nice. I didnt count them but based on our spacing I'd say there may have been more than 100 crowns of each - they were banded in I think sets of 10 but again we didnt count - too busy just trying to get them planted. There were only a few that had some mold on them or mushy - those got tossed to the side.

  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA

    Holy Moly Jamie - you were a busy bee yesterday! All that squash - are you planning cukes?

  • PRO
    Len NW 7a

    Jack and Margi,


    All of my peas are snow or snap and we eat them fresh as fast as they grow. About the first of July they are done and I remove as soon as they show any disease. Have planted for a fall crop two years in a row with complete failure...it just gets too wet too soon around here so will not try again.


    Area under my lights is becoming very crowded so I am hardening off onion starts and flowers to plant out this weekend. Also started first batch of basil and other herb seeds for DW garden yesterday afternoon. Also need to drag out box of dahlia tubers and see how they are doing...it is still too soon to plant them as they also need that 60 degree+ soil.


    Cooler device for her shoulder came yesterday and she says it is making her much surgery site more comfortable.

  • Jamie

    haha, thanks! We do eat a lot of squash- especially winter squash. I am hoping to fight off the squash bugs and vine borers long enough to get a good harvest. It took about 4 hours to get everything situated yesterday evening and that included watering the stuff we already had out. I started around 4 and finished around 8. Mike started helping around 6 when he got home.

    We haven't gotten the drip system up and running yet. One of the connectors in one line got broken, but I fixed it. We will hook it up to the timer this evening to make sure there are no leaks. We won't need to run it for several days though, given the fact that it's supposed to rain the next few days.

    We are planting cucumbers and will do that this evening. I have two "compact" varieties (Spacemaster, Bush Crop) to try out and two pickling varieties (Cool Customer, H-19 Little Leaf).

    Of course, it's supposed to drip down into the 40s Thursday-Friday and we will have some thunderstorms on Thursday. I am going to break out the agribon fabric again and cover the beds just to keep the seeds from getting washed around too badly and just in case there is some severe weather that might hurt the tomatoes and peppers. I'll remove it on Friday.

    I went back and forth about waiting to transplant, but we are leaving on Saturday for a week of vacation. My mother-in-law will be staying at the house to take care of the dogs and I didn't want to have her dealing with watering the transplants as well.

  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA

    Len - your garden is looking great! Jealous of your pea plants - all mine are nibbled to the ground!

  • Jamie

    Kevin- did that rabbit come back last night?

  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA

    He was there two nights ago... I received my coyote urine (my mailman must think I am nuts) yesterday and applied it around the garden. WOW does it stink! Smells like a skunk! Didnt get a chance to check the garden for damage this morning yet.

  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA

    The dogs in the neighborhood were very interested in the garden smells lol.

  • John D Zn6a PIT Pa

    Kevin

    I'm thinking you could grow onion plants for sale locally; next year. I don't know if you're successful with onions. I'm thinking I don't know a single place to find them here. If we order by mail we're wasting money on shipping; over buying locally. And perhaps you could sell varieties more appropriate for this area. Just an idea.

  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA

    John - I did onion plants for our sale last year but people werent really interested in them. I did notice my local Lowes (Waterfront) had plants for what I recall was a reasonable price - I didnt really take a close look at them because I was in a rush. Probably all short day varieties lol.

  • Jamie

    Kevin I’m laughing at that coyote urine. Our dogs would be absolutely crazy with that odor Hahahaha

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

    Fox urine smells lovely as well. I think there is a fox den on my or one of my neighbor's property because I've seen it several times out hunting in the last few weeks when I leave for work. March - May is when they have their litter of kits. Hopefully she took out the groundhog that I had been seeing!

    A couple years ago a fox had a litter in our neighborhood and then got hit by a car. The young kits weren't very smart and were running around the neighborhood in the middle of the day and playing with dogs. I don't think they lasted very long.

  • 14tomatoes_md_7a

    Buying this for herbs -- superb reviews, 20% off now, plus free shipping! What do you folks think?

    Tony

    https://www.lowes.com/pd/L-G-Solutions-19-3-in-W-x-12-1-in-H-Resin-Planter/50445052

  • PRO
    Len NW 7a

    looks good tony...and here is a bonus...Amazon has it for $26.22 so it must be a bargain at $11

  • Jamie

    I have several of those pots, Tony. They’re great!

    all planted and all of the supports are up. I planted 4 varieties of cucumbers today also. Some of the tomatoes look a little weak, but the majority of them are nice and healthy. I have some empty spaces that I might fill in with bush beans or something else.

    We were using the trellises to support agribon fabric during the early winter and that’s why they have pipe insulation on the corners. I need to take that off haha


  • Jamie

    And the blackberry is blooming

  • PRO
    Len NW 7a


    Wow Jamie your garden is so far along already!

    I harvested some inner wintered Russian red kale for supper...yumm

    Jamie thanked Len NW 7a
  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA

    Jamie - wonderful!!!!


    Len - that looks like it made a great salad!


    Amongst sowing radish, hakarei turnips and cilantro, and transplanting parsley and oregano in the garden, I checked the peas and broccoli and it looks like the rabbit has stayed away a little. I applied more coyote urine which should be good till the rain comes this weekend.


    Could the peas regrow even if they were chomped down to just stems?


    Im really itching to get tomatoes in the ground, but if the F- word hits I’m going to really be scrambling to cover a lot of stuff so I might just wait another week or two. Plus I haven’t set up the trellising system in the hoophouse yet.

    Jamie thanked Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA
  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA

    Something unexpected and cool happened yesterday on the farm. This old box car that was included in the property sale needed to be moved, because it was found to be sitting on the property line and they are looking to sell the rest of the property. Luckily they had some equipment including this loader and they were kind enough to move it up next to our market garden. So now instead of having to walk/drive 600 feet to it the shed is right by our plots. Really sad to see the family selling off because they are some of the nicest people I’ve met, every last one of them.






  • John D Zn6a PIT Pa

    I planted my last post today; literally. The post has been on the bottom of the stack, for what might be two months? It's a Wild Black Cherry, the furniture cherry. The post is leafing out. It's been a dormant cutting off a tree, kinda like a fruit tree scion that you graft to a rootstock. It can live off the stored sugars and water within the cutting. The base is in the ground, I shoulda otta watered it.

    So all the posts are up; the top two stands of wire are stretched tight across the, almost, 200 feet of length. I need to complete the circle at the truck gate. The top strand gets permanently attached, the two lower strands I'm going to connect so that I can get a truck in, I think just using S hooks.

  • Jamie

    Kevin, did the rabbit chomp off the tops of the peas or just the leaves? If he just ate the leaves, some of them. If he just ate the leaves they might grow back but I think I would just start fresh if you can.


  • Jamie

    Here are a couple of podcasts with Jack Algiere the farm director at Stone Barn Center (the farm that our friend Chris from 6b NY talks about) One on crop rotation: https://joegardener.com/podcast/crop-rotation-basics-and-beyond/ and the other on cover crops: https://joegardener.com/podcast/100-understanding-cover-crops-the-basics-and-beyond-with-jack-algiere/

    I listened to the second one this morning on the way to work.

  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA

    John congrats on getting the last post, er, sapling(?), installed! Do you have any photographs of the space?

    Jamie - thanks for the link on the podcasts, I'll add those to my rotation. Cutting 3 acres tonight as long as the weather holds up so maybe I'll take a listen during seat time lol.

    Some of the peas tops are chomped completely and others are just nibbled leaves. I think they might have been planted densely enough to fill out the space if they can remain out of the rabbits mouth. I might plant a 72 cell tray of peas and then 'fill in' the spaces that are more bare with transplants as they grow.

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