FOR PROS
Business tools custom-built for our industry

Say 'so long' to generic business software. Houzz Pro is designed for industry professionals like you.

sarahandbray_gw

Does 'Low-E' have to = tinted glass?

sarahandbray
7 years ago

Contemplating new windows on this big old house and several companies have showed me their "low-e" windows--but I never realized how "tinted" they look. I just want windows that are as clear as possible--are there any out there or do low-e windows have to look tinted?

Sarah

Comments (61)

  • socalgal_gw Zone USDA 10b Sunset 24

    I can see the color difference when looking at my house from the outside, but never notice it when looking out of the windows from the inside.

  • friedajune

    Socalgal - as noted, the amount of tinting that is visible depends on which LoE level your windows have. Judging from your name and the Zone 10b in your handle, I am going to guess you have the LoE 366.

    We do not know where Cristy Miller lives. In my Zone 5a in the upper midwest, LowE 366 is not needed. Standard here is LoE 272, which does not appear to make glass look tinted. My windows contractor told me I could also order my windows in LoE 188 if I wanted, which would be a small upcharge as it's not standard. But you wouldn't want to do that if you live where Socalgal lives or similar.

  • Related Discussions

    Low E4 Smart Sun versus Low E4 glass for a house in Iowa

    Q

    Comments (1)
    The "smartsun" is an extra product that blocks UV rays without darkening (without tinting) the glass. The smartsun will reduce fading of fabrics, wood, etc. It will reduce cooling requirements in the summer as it reduces the 'heating' UV rays. In essence, the "smartsun" option is a much higher quality product that offers one step more than the normal Low E windows. If fading of furniture, carpets, vinyl floors, etc is a concern then the only thing that can be done is to add the smartsun option. If that doesn't bother you and if you are not concerned about extra heat in the summer time then the Low E should do just fine.
    ...See More

    What is Low-E Glass and Does it Really Help?

    Q

    Comments (0)
    If you’ve ever shopped for windows, you probably wondered whether you need Low-E glass or if it’s just some marketing mumbo-jumbo. “Low-E” refers to low emissivity. Ok. What does that mean? Well, emissivity is a measure of how easily a surface transfers radiant thermal energy…the heat absorbed by objects. Low-emissivity means the surface transfers radiant thermal energy at a low level. Energy-Efficient Benefits of Low-E Glass We could go into the details of radiant energy and throw around terms like shortwave rays, long-wave rays and thermal radiation, but we want to keep this simple. The simple explanation of the energy-efficient benefits of low-e glass is that it reflects radiant heat. In the summer, it keeps your home cool by reflecting away the heat radiating from sidewalks, driveways, patios, decks, and other objects that absorb heat. In the winter, it keeps your home warm by reflecting the radiant heat your furnace system worked so hard to create back into the house. For example, compare low-e glass to aluminum foil. Foil reflects heat back toward the food to keep it warm. If you covered your windows with foil, your room would be cooler in summer and warmer in winter. But the view wouldn’t be so good. Low-e glass to the rescue! Reduce Fading and Other Damage *Credit: Hardwood Floors Magazine Besides keeping your home more comfortable year-round, low-e glass also works to reduce the early fading of your wood floors, carpeting, drapes and upholstery fabrics caused by ultraviolet (UV) and other damaging rays, by blocking about two-times more UV light than clear, single-pane glass. Available on doors, too! – Doors can also benefit from low-e glass. We’ve seen examples of indoor rugs that completely faded in front of a full view door and wood floors that faded compared to the same floor underneath an area rug. The more glass on the door, the more important low-e glass becomes. Our window and door experts can help you determine the right glass to use for your situation. Call us to get started. Some Summer Energy-Efficiency Tips… Check the weatherstrip on your doors and windows. This is typically only considered in the winter to prevent drafts, but an improperly sealed window or door can let summer heat into the home, too. Install awnings, overhangs or shades over windows or doors that get extreme sun exposure. A combination of minimizing sunlight and adding low-e glass is the best way to reduce unwanted heat gain. Use window, ceiling and whole-house fans to keep your home a little cooler. - See more at: http://doorstoreandwindows.com/does-low-e-glass-help/#sthash.3VJASkSC.dpuf
    ...See More

    Beige paint color with low e glass and stained trim

    Q

    Comments (2)
    Kilim Beige
    ...See More

    Window Low-E Coating Options

    Q

    Comments (1)
    What windows did you end up choosing? I’m in Minnesota.
    ...See More
  • ef_houseman

    There are many European window suppliers who offer ultra-clear glass. Just make sure to check the glass specs to confirm that the glass has a low U-Value and high UV rating.

  • David Motola

    Do yourself a favor and do NOT buy Low E windows. My window guy just finished the install 15 minutes ago and the house is extremely darker than it was before. There's even a greenish tint in the house now. I love the look of the windows but in my opinion, low E is just not worth it because it lets in considerably less light and tints your house greenish.

  • PRO
    Windows on Washington Ltd

    That is a fairly categorical statement. Do you know what type of Low-e you got? Low-e, depending on the coating, will only have a Visible Transmittance that is about 10% less than that of clear glass, but will be three times (3X) as good at blocking the suns radiant heat, five times (5X) as good at blocking UV, and at least two times (2X) as efficient.

    Seems like a reasonable trade off when normal float glass (even non Low-e) has a greenish tint.


    You home may, in fact, be very dark from the Low-e depending on what you installer specified. It would not be the first time that a company didn't specify the right range Low-e.

  • romai

    Not all Low-e glass is the same when it comes to light transmission. As part of a home renovation I had Low-e windows installed from one manufacturer (Low-e2 from Marvin) and a Low-e patio door from another at a later date. The glass on the patio door is distinctly darker than the windows, which bothered me and led me to research light transmission online. In fact, I even thought my windows might not be Low-e after all because the difference was so dramatic. (Ironically, after installing the windows all I noticed was how much more light I had in my home because I had enlarged many existing openings.) Post-research, I've compared my view with an open and closed window, yes, I see a slight darkening, but... no different from an old regular-glass window that had been installed 20 years ago (all glass limits light transmission to a degree.) For me, the lesson learned is to research glazing more thoroughly when buying windows and to get glass samples to take home before purchase. I think manufacturers aren't taking the time to inform consumers about the light transmission impact of glass as much as the energy efficiency and it should definitely be part of the conversation. If I'd somehow ended up with windows that were all like my 'dark' door, I'd be very upset.

  • millworkman

    There is something to be said for doing your own due diligence. The window manufacturers off the glass data, and the internet is loaded with all the glass data. The window dealer you use should be giving you the glass type with the proposal. If you use a quality dealer you will get the info. A box store, not so much...............................

  • mae607

    Help me understand Cardinal glass low e as far as what has the least amount of tint.

    cardinal low e i89

    Cardinal low e 180

    cardinal low e 270

    does the smaller number equate to lighter/less tint?

    i am looking at Pella Impervia double pane. They have “Advanced”, “AdvancedComfort”, and “NaturalSun”. I’m in Minnesota.. Thanks! First time posting a question so I hope this works!!

  • alex9179

    Scroll through the link and you'll see the numbers for the different glass makeup along with the different coatings.

    https://www.cardinalcorp.com/technology/reference/loe-performance-stats/

  • mae607

    I can’t understand that chart. Eeeek sorry! Thanks for trying to help! I don’t have the thickness of the glass. Pella chart shows glass (mm) ext 2.5 and int 2.5. Cardinal shows in inches?

    http://media.pella.com/professional/adm/Fiberglass/F2CM_GP.pdf

  • alex9179

    i89 is paired with another E coating to comply with energy guidelines.

    LoE 180 allows 79% transmittance (passive solar offering might be Pella's NaturalSun)

    LoE 240 allows 40% transmittance

    LoE 340 allows 36% transmittance

    LoE 366 allows 65% transmittance

    You'll have to ask Pella or the dealer how their names align with Cardinal's coatings, if a pro doesn't come in with the info.

  • mae607

    Thank you!

  • ellenw

    I had new windows installed as replacements on three egress windows two years ago. (Semco) I just noticed the glass has all turned green. The rep says they’re low e and that they do that. I didn’t specify low e at the time, and the rep said they were ordered that way for energy compliance. Does this sound accurate? The window above is above the egress window. It is not low e. Same light. Thank you.




  • HU-917061881

    We just had replacement windows from Lindsay Windows installed in our kitchen. We had no idea they would be "lowE" and they are awful. They let in very little light and there is a huge difference in the brightness of the room when they are open vs closed. It's our mistake as first-time homeowners undergoing our first renovation. We didn't ask and I unknowingly thought all glass was clear unless otherwise noted. I feel compelled to tell everyone this warning, especially when places like Windows on Washington are misleading readers in this post. If we could do it again, we would never purchase lowE windows.

  • PRO
    Windows on Washington Ltd

    Can you tell me where you think I am "misleading" readers please? If you don't mind, can you show me where I have provided incorrect or misleading information.

    Please feel free to read over some of the Low-e stats on this page: Cardinal Glass - Low-e and Clear Glass Data

    A quick review of the stats will easily show that the VT offset between clear glass and one of the more popular Low-e (Low-e 272) ranges is exactly, 10%.

    If you do not know what Low-e was specified in this case, it is impossible to make and informed comment.

    There are more than a handful of situations where contractors incorrectly specify Low-e ranges and than can certainly have an impact on glass characteristics and VT transmission. That is the fault of the contractor in that case and not the glass.

  • millworkman

    "We had no idea they would be "lowE" and they are awful."


    Did you buy these windows sight unseen? Have you done any research of the windows before purchasing? 98% of all windows today, both residential and commercial have Low E Glass (and the 98% may be low). Building and energy code in every portion of the US requires now at some level.

    You cannot blame your being naive, and not doing any homework at all or at the very least reading what you are purchasing on anyone but yourself. As stated above without knowing what product you purchased, received, and area of the country it is impossible to tell if you even got the correct Low E for your region.

  • HU-917061881

    First of all, a 10% offset is very noticeable to the naked eye. As a seller of Low-e windows, you're motivated to tell others how great the product is. I get that, but it's misleading to real homeowners who have to live with the decision day in and day out. As a user of the product (admittedly not yours specifically), and a community member of Houzz, I have to share the truth with other homeowners. Low-e windows change the brightness level in your house and purchasing them when you care about brightness in a room is an expensive mistake to make.


    Secondly, you are discounting the opinion of David Motola, who is a real homeowner and someone who has to live with his purchase as well. Again, you're just trying to sell windows.


    Lastly, your comment that "Most client never even comment on it except to remark how much more comfortable the home is." is a fairly categorical statement, which is exactly the complaint you levied against David.

  • HU-917061881

    Millworkman -I take full responsibility for my purchase, and that is exactly why I presented my experience as a cautionary tale. I had no idea these types of windows even existed or were becoming code. I am not up to date on such things as I have only recently returned to the US after being in Africa for the last eight years helping to build water purification systems. But thank you for your criticism. I only hope to share my experience with other homeowners.

  • PRO
    Windows on Washington Ltd

    Perception of light, much like temperature, is a very personal experience. Some are more sensitive to light than others.

    Allow me to address your points in order:

    1. Whether 10% is noticeable is entirely dependent on the person. For the record, 10% is about the same amount that you loose through a single pane of glass in this case so lets make the point to keep that in perspective.
    2. VT of a single lite of CLEAR glass is 90%
    3. VT of dual pane unit, CLEAR glass, is 82%
    4. I am not "motivated" to tell homeowner's how great it is. It is the technology of today and is the most cost effective option impacting efficiency. I suppose you could look at triple pane or other staged clear glass assemblies for efficiency in lieu of Low-e, but each of those additional pane is costing you about another 10% in VT. The conundrum remains the same.
    5. I think you might be shooting the messenger here. I am not trying to "sell" windows here as much as I am trying to inform folks. Building Code in most of the country will require a window with Low-e so if you have a problem with Code, I suggest you take it up with the government.
    6. My point has been that there are definitively different types of Low-e and if you are noting a huge offset in light, it is likely that you got the wrong Low-e either for you home, you climate, or at a minimum...your preference. That is a fault of the contractor or the selection process on some level.
    7. If you would like to let us know what window you got and post a picture of the NFRC label (or serial number label), I can tell you what Low-e you got and where the problem might be. If it is just a single window, you might be able to swap the sashes for a proper Low-e or for just clear glass.
    8. Until you have provided that information, we can't really know what the "truth" of the situation really is.
    9. My comment to David is the same as it would be to your statement. The only one that is incorrectly categorical is the one that lacks any data or facts to support it. To say that Low-e is terrible and makes the house dark is totally based in opinion and while it may be that person's truth, without any background information...it is severely lacking.
    10. For the record, I am not doubting what you are feeling, but I haven't the slightest clue about what Low-e you got and what window you are talking about. The facts are that Low-e, when PROPERLY specified, should only be about a 10% offset. If someone that was specifying the window doesn't know the specs or the details...you may have gotten a very dark window. That isn't the fault of Low-e as much as it is the fault of the person ordering the window.
    11. The categorical statement that I am making is based on data. We have installed 10's of thousands of windows at this point and the number of client complaints is infinitesimally small. Granted, we are specifying the right Low-e for our climate, but the number of complaints is less than 5 in 15 years. I think that is a bit more data driven sample and comment.

    If you want to categorize the 10,000+ posts that I have on Houzz and other forums trying to help folks as "selling" windows, so be it. I guess you haven't seen the countless posts where I have tried to help folks (even when that means steering them away from buying a product that they thought they needed). If this is "selling" windows, this is a less than effective way to do it.

  • Shannon_WI

    HU-917061881 - (always offputting when someone posts without bothering to name themselves) - please read this entire thread. You will see mentioned several times that there are different levels of LowE coating. This is important for you to realize. You do not say which coating you have. As mentioned in this thread, LowE-272 comes standard in windows manufacturing today. Regardless of which brand, it will have standard LowE-272 coating. LowE-272 does not show a tint. This was discussed in this thread and other threads. If instead your windows have LowE-366 coating - which should have been listed in your work proposal - it often shows a tint. Look at your work proposal that you must have signed off on and see what LowE coating your windows have.

  • PRO
    HomeSealed Exteriors, LLC

    Its important to note that 272 and 366 are Low-e profiles from Cardinal, and what is "standard" depends on geographic location, however the general points made by Shannon are pretty on point. Warmer areas use heavier/darker low-e such as the 366, or a similar profile offered by another manufacturer like Guardian. These block a lot of heat and are darker. Cooler climates use the lighter profile (272 variant) as "standard"... with one big caveat, and that is that many unscrupulous window companies/salesmen will sell the darker stuff even where its not ideal because it has a better u value. That doesn't always mean better performance.


    As far as low-e in general and the comments of other respected contributors, there is not much here that is is anything but both sincere and factual. Windows on Washington for instance is a very ethical organization run by fine people. He's also helped thousands of folks over the years on this and other forums make educated decisions where he had zero to gain from it.


    Low e is not a "gimmick", not by a long shot. There are plenty of those(gimmicks) in this industry, but when spec'd properly, it is probably the biggest and most effective advancement in window technology in recent history. If your windows are super dark, it may very well be due to an improperly specified profile, OR you just may be more sensitive to that than 99.9% of other homeowners. That last comment shouldn't be taken as a dig or anything its just not something that comes up... nearly ever. Again, your preferences and perceptions are what they are, but just know that this is legitimate, no snake oil on this topic.

  • PRO
    toddinmn

    I know if some companies that only offer 366, the Company I use will use a default glass pack unless one is specified . I can honestly say I say I have never had a complain about Low-E after being in the biz 25 years. I get a very very few complaints on loss of glass when installing inserts. These type of windows can have a big effect on the amount of light let in but only very sensitive homeowners have noticed. Clear glass is not even an option with some manufactures and as stated would need to a triple glazed unit if no low-E .i did have one home owner complain about the tint on glass even though it was clear glass but not as clear as his.,This was on on single pane storm window.

  • Fred Jackson

    I have MI 3500 Series windows in my new build home and the green tint is very noticeable and unattractive. The entire paint colors I picked out are screwed up - alabaster trim is now lime. Kitchen cabinets have an avocado pull to them. I got the HP Low-E option but cannot locate the numerical value mentioned in this thread.


    So much for natural light huh? It is so bad I'm considering swapping the sashes out, at least in select rooms.

  • PRO
    Windows on Washington Ltd

    I would first figure out what version of Low-e you have in there. Low-e 3 is massively over indicated across the country and that fact has more so contributed to this "green'ing" than anything else.

  • nidnay

    I guess then that all these new subdivisions have improperly specced out their windows because all the glass on the THOUSANDS of homes I’ve seen from the outside look green, and when inside they are DARK.

    I can tell you that going from clear glass (older windows) to lowE is an absolute shock to the system. I find they severely cut down on light, so count me in with the .1%. I hate my windows because they allow so little light transmittance. Also, they are so ridiculously reflective that it’s difficult to see through them.....the glare obscures the view....even on cloudy days.

    I would rather have faded floors and carpet and a higher utility bill but have windows that actually allow me to see outside unobstructed with no loss of light. When I read that 99.9% of people notice no difference and are not bothered at all by these new energy efficient windows I find it shocking because the loss of light through them is so drastic to me. And could it be that all these energy efficient requirements actually have negative impacts that we are ignorant of at this juncture. People need lots of natural light for their health and well-being and codes requiring lowE windows along with their lower light transmittance seem like a real invasion of privacy (and IMO governmental overreach...... but that’s another subject for another day). It’s especially critical for those who actually see and feel the difference in a major way.

    If I owned a home with older “normal” windows I would count my blessings and would never replace them with windows that cut out so much light. Completely changes the feel of ones interior space.

  • fridge2020

    nidnay look through the number of posts made here and how few are complaining about this. Look across other sites and resources. it’s just not something that most people find to be an issue, period.

    As far as health concerns, head outside to get your vitamin D. You aren’t getting much of that inside your home with or without low e, not to mention the fact that today’s homes have far more glazing area by percentage which should more than balance that.

    On the ”government overreach”, most renovation jobs don’t apply. Buy yourself some clear glass windows to go with your incandescent lightbulbs , galvanized water supply pipes, and oil burning furnace. Have at it.

  • Fred Jackson

    nidnay is right on. The LowE I have severely darkens spaces (with jolly green giant tinting ) when the expectation should be relatively untainted natural light. I have a nice open space with 5 3050 windows and 5 transom windows and it feels like I'm in a cave. And for some reason the window industry says this is a consumer issue since there "hasn't been that much complaining".

  • fridge2020

    All Windows are rated for visible transmittance Fred, no conspiracy. What does a “consumer issue“ even mean? It’s subjective. Nobody is saying that you can’t dislike your windows or that there is anything wrong with that being your opinion. What’s being said is that in the same way, there is nothing wrong glass being specified by application based on properties of energy efficiency, because it is literally less than 1 in 10,000 (maybe significantly less) that have any problem with the aesthetic aspect. Do you know what would happen if a lot More people had the same concerns? Builders and remodelers would stop selling it, or at least make darn sure they ask upfront because nobody wants unhappy customers. Until then, even though your opinion cannot be wrong as an opinion, the fact is that it is an outlier, so it’s incumbent upon you to do your due diligence before you build a home or buy new windows.

  • PRO
    Windows on Washington Ltd

    This idea that properly specified Low-e creates a "cave" is a bit of hyperbole when we are talking about a 10% offset...don't we think?

    Copied from my posts above:

    Perception of light, much like temperature, is a very personal experience. Some are more sensitive to light than others.

    1. Whether 10% is noticeable is entirely dependent on the person. For
      the record, 10% is about the same amount that you loose through a single
      pane of glass in this case so lets make the point to keep that in
      perspective.
    2. VT of a single lite of CLEAR glass is 90%
    3. VT of dual pane unit, CLEAR glass, is 82%
    4. VT of a dual pane unit with a proper Low-e, is about 72%

    I don't here about anyone complaining about the different between one pane of glass vs. two panes of glass so this idea that the 10% offset is that much of a disturbance seems to not reflect in the data.

    Again...if builders or remodelers are specifying the WRONG low-e spectrum, you can certainly create a green appearance. That is more the fault of the builder, remodeler, and/or customer in that case than the Low-e.

  • PRO
    toddinmn

    https://american-windows.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/cardinal.pdf

    Some good visuals here And all the numbers you need.

  • nidnay

    Windows on Washington...... Can you direct me to a typical single hung vinyl builder grade window that is normally installed in the average tract home with a VT of 72% and no green tint.

  • PRO
    toddinmn

    Keep in mind that the numbers listed are glass only and not the entire window unit.

    The numbers on window units will be lower vs glass. I don’t think you could find a new window with a clear IG to even get to 72%.

  • PRO
    toddinmn

    This is a typical builder grade window.

    As you can see a clear IG unit is only 0.62.

    pic is not loading, the visible for there low-E is 0.54. This is on a American Craftsmen window .

  • PRO
    Windows on Washington Ltd

    Thank you Todd. The numbers quoted above are for glass only so that the comparison is for the glass and does not account for any frame differences.


  • PRO
    HomeSealed Exteriors, LLC

    Good information from Wow and Todd. Puts things in perspective... I believe that what WoW has alluded to is the primary factor here, in that lower end windows require more aggressive low e profiles to get decent U values. These are often misapplied by builders and contractors in effort to have a window that looks better on paper than it actually is. The dark tint and low shgc are generally detrimental for most folks in anything but warm climates, a fact that I mentioned in an older post above.

    Who's fault is this? Some blame can probably be assigned on all sides, from manufacturers trying to prop up their windows to look better, contractors/dealers being ill informed or worse, and consumers for not educating themselves on their purchase.

    The Energy Star program itself is far from perfect on this as well, however they at least made some attempt at incorporating SHGC into the most current iteration, although it still leaves enough room for a window that would work best in Arizona to be installed in WI or MN and get the Energy Star rating.... These low VT, low SHGC glass profiles are the likely culprit when these appearance concerns arise. Even at that, most people don't notice, but there is definitely a difference in a window with a VT in the 50's vs one in the 30's or low 40's in most cases, assuming that all else is equal (frame thickness, presence of grids, etc).

  • nidnay

    The reason I asked my question about builder grade windows is because that is what is generally installed in the typical tract home and you’d be hard pressed to find any of them that have a high VT (and no green tint for that matter). If you want high VT, you must pay a lot more per window and builders are looking at their bottom line. They are not going to install higher VT windows because it is just not cost effective and there is no competition from other builders who are offering a better window with higher VT. And the average homeowner just cannot afford to replace these offending windows because the cost is prohibitive. So for your average customer looking for a new home with decent unobscured glass, it’s not going to happen because that product doesn’t exist.


    So really, my gripe is that because of code we are REQUIRED to have lowE windows, but the cost of a window with a high VT is completely out of range for many and is non existent in the tract home. It’s only the higher quality windows that will have glass available with a very high VT. Correct me if I’m wrong.....actually, I would LOVE to be wrong!

  • PRO
    HomeSealed Exteriors, LLC

    nidnay, the proper glass is really not much more expensive. A better quality window may very well be. I for one am always excited and impressed when I see folks that are planning a new build actually researching the window aspect, as most people just assume that a new window will be good and last for 30+ years. That is not true. I'd contend that the bigger issue with these builder grade windows is the fact that they are often at the end of their useful service life around 10 years, so I'd suggest that anyone who would consider the expense of swapping glass in such a window take that into account.

    In higher end homes that may be spec'd out with a name brand, wood window, its very possible that a higher end vinyl unit WITH the appropriate glass could be used for a cost that is actually less. Usually these types of decisions are only able to be made however with custom home builders. The big cookie cutter builders use what they use in most cases, and you are right, that is not generally in your best interest. The only thing I'd add is typically there are far more cost cutting measures taken in these homes than just the windows.

  • Fred Jackson

    For reference, here is MI's HP-LowE, 40% VT next to natural light on alabaster trim. They have a regular lowE that is probably less offensive in terms of darkening and making your interior looking like a giant margarita.


    One should get an actual window sample, if possible, before purchasing.


  • PRO
    Windows on Washington Ltd

    I recommend you check the stats above. Comparing a double paned window with Low-e to nothing at all is going to be a bit of a stark contrast, but unrepresentative of the actual comparison.

    If the Low-e range is specified properly for your climate and the window isn't junk (i.e. can pas muster with a 2 coat Low-e vs. a 3), the offset in VT is about 10% points.

    What climate zone are you in and why did they specify a 3 coat Low-e in your case?

  • Fred Jackson

    I'm in the DFW area of Texas. I have no idea why they specified a 3 coat Low-E - probably because all the other builders were using them. Their regular low-e has a VT of .56, while their no low-e has a VT of .66.


    To top it off I have shade trees.


    Do you think it is possible to replace the IG units, at least in select rooms? Thanks.

  • PRO
  • PRO
    Windows on Washington Ltd

    It is, but it will have a different reflectivity from the exterior. While I would love to blame the builder here, given the climate and heating/cooling load of Dallas, a lower range SHGC would be proper in this case.

  • fridge2020

    You have no idea why? You are in Texas. That’s why. Builder used the proper glass, and he’s probably dobe so on 10’s or 100’s of thousands of windows with no complaints. He would have been derelict in his function had he used no low e or single coat, unless it was requested or your home was built with solar gain in mind. The good news, is yes, you can replace igu’s as you see fit. Like i said before, it’s not crazy for you to dislike your windows. It is a crazy line of thinking though if you think that a home builder in DFW did something wrong by using Windows with lowe2 or lowe3.

  • lst73

    OK so I live in North Carolina and I am looking at windows to purchase for my new build. How do I avoid the horrid green hue! Which windows do I buy, and what do I ask for?

  • millworkman

    Code will require Low E so you will have some green. Glass itself has an inherent green tint to it. To get away from the green (and still 100%) you would need to go to a Low Iron glass which will add considerable dollars to the price.

  • PRO
    Windows on Washington Ltd

    +1. A clear glass window will give off a greenish hue so I hope you aren't that sensitive. The pictures above are typically of windows with a 3 coat Low-e. I would suggest that you stay in the 2 coat ranges. Have you picked out a window supplier yet?

  • lst73

    No I haven’t chosen one yet.

  • nidnay

    You might also want to check the VLT (Visible Light Transmission) numbers when searching for windows. The lower the number, the less visible light that gets into your interior (which can interfere with a bright and cheery space). In addition, many of these LowE windows are so reflective, it can make it very difficult to see details when trying to look through the glass. I don’t know if there are options in glass that can cut down on this reflectivity making them less visibly reflective, but it’s something to look into.

    The world of windows can be super confusing and many times the reps do not give you ALL the pertinent information to be able to make a choice that is best for YOU. I also found that many of them actually have no clue or real expertise about what they are selling ....you must know the correct questions to ask and be somewhat informed on potential issues with each choice.

  • lst73

    What is the difference in low e and HP low e? Is one more green with one or the other?

  • millworkman

    " HP low e"


    If by Andersen you mean, they use Cardinal and just call their Low E glass HP or High Performance.

Need help with an existing Houzz order? Call 1-800-368-4268