Shop Products
Houzz Logo Print
wantmoreroses

Quikcrete Concrete Resurfacer vs Quikwall

17 years ago

Does anyone know if there is a major difference between these two products? I am only able to get the resurfacer here. Quikwall just isn't available, and I am was hoping not to have to buy all the individual components. My first attempts at making cast leaves has been using the vinyl concrete repair, but I want to do a sphere. I think what I am using now will work, but would like to try using a different mix. Thanks for any insight.

Comments (13)

  • 17 years ago

    For what it's worth, I think Sakrete Surface Bonding Cement might be the closest we Quikwall deprived souls can find. It seems to have the same things in it that Quikwall does...cement, lime, sand, fibers. Sadly, I can't find the Sakrete either.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Sakrete Surface Bonding Cement

  • 17 years ago

    I went ahead and got the Quikcrete resurfacer, which seems to be the same as the Sakrete product that you are talking about. I didn't see any fibers in it, but it does seem to have a more "clay like" feel to it. I just tried a little bit last night on a leaf, and so we shall see how it does. I am so new to this, that until I really learn what I am doing, I think this will work just fine. But, I have a feeling that pretty soon, I might just have to make a road trip to find some Quikwall.

  • 17 years ago

    Wantmore- Quickwall (according to the data sheet) says it is waterproof. I don't think any of the other products say that but I haven't checked them all. That is a sort of nice feature if you are trying to make a sphere that holds water but other than that I think many other products would do fine. Let us know what you think of the resurfacer for projects!

    When you make a sphere, I think finding the right mesh is important- I use EIFS mesh (alkalai resistant fiberglass ). Maybe people have had success with other kinds of mesh.... I don't know.

    Laura

  • 17 years ago

    I wonder what "ingredient" makes Quikwall waterproof. Maybe Rick H. knows. I think I read that the Sakrete product is water resistant, probably when properly cured.

  • 17 years ago

    MorninG
    I concur with Laura about the mesh.I've also read that the concrete canoe teams are using Kevlar mesh in their mixes.Anyone tried that?
    As to waterproofing-good question and I'm not enough of a technician to give you a sound scientific answer.I know that Mymud has been exposed to water in my first ball for about a year,and,except for some latex paint,the thing is not sealed.I've had zero leakage.I'd have to say that the waterproofness might be because of the pozzolans used in Quikwall,Mymud and others.It substantially increases the density of the concrete.
    A note about"waterproof" notes on packaging.If you read the side of silicone containers,many will say waterproof.Read the REAL fine print and you'll discover the following phrase"not meant for continuous use underwater"!So,I'm guessing that the construction industry has degrees of waterproofness.Make sure that if you're relying upon what the package says,that you check further in the fine print on the website.You might find a variation of the info!!
    gotta run-meetings to take!
    Cheers from here

  • 17 years ago

    Thank you all for the input here. I am going to be working with the resurfacer this next week, and won't be online during that time. But, I will let you all know how it works out. Thanks again,
    Vicki

  • 17 years ago

    I wouldn't bother with kevlar fibres in concrete. kevlar is attacked by water and is more stretchy than cement. Stick with glass fibres, which are cheaper and stiffer.

    Kevlar really only makes sense when weight is at a premium. If weight were at a premium you wouldn't be using concrete...

  • 17 years ago

    I am back from vacation, and wanted to let you know how the Quikcrete concrete resurfacer was to work with. I really liked the results. When I first started with it, I wasn't sure that I liked the "feel" of it, but I started adding some wood glue to the water that I used to mix it up, and I loved it. I made a 16" sphere with applied leaves. I took some pics but since all I had to use was my phone camera, they aren't good at all. I want to get your opinions, so I will try again with the picture thing tonight.

  • 17 years ago

    Actually,Nathan,I'm using concrete and weight is a problem-or,it was.With Laura's inspiration,I've developed my own lightweight concrete,and the results are excellent.Last year's masks,which weighed about 20 lbs or so,now weigh in at 4 lbs!The formula I've come up with I now use on larger and larger balls.This year,32 inches,next year,40 inches in diameter.I use detail mesh,not Kevlar,in my work,along with fibres(just got glass fibres,trying them soon).Both products are alkali-resistant and developed for the stucco industry.
    As to the mention of Kevlar-As stated,the websites put up by the concrete canoeists(primarily engineering students throughout North America,and,I believe other countries as well)mention it as their reinforcement for the canoe structure.They have 2 man canoes at 85 lbs.Also,apparently the space program is coming calling on it as well.The proposed Mars mission will build a weatherstation,utilising Kevlar and concrete!
    Cheers from here on Canada's Sunshine Coast
    Rick

  • 17 years ago

    Well perhaps I'm wrong, but it seems to me that if the fibres stretch more than cement (lower modulus of elasticity) then they can only stop complete failure, not cracking. The effect will be lots of microcracks, but these will allow water in which will then break things down more quickly.

    (I'm also dubious that the weight difference between kevlar and glass will be measurable, surely kevlar is not less than half the density of glass (2.2ish) - it sinks in water if I remember rightly)

  • 17 years ago

    Nathan-we may be at cross purposes here.I'm referring to the mesh used,not the fibres.The mesh comes in 9 inch by 50 ft rolls.Doing what I do wouldn't be possible without the detail(or,EIFS)mesh.I also use fibres,both fibreglass and glass,as additional support during the cure.The Kevlar reference would be for the same mesh scenario.And,who am I to contradict all those engineering students who use it??
    As to leakage-on the majority of the pieces made,no problems at all.I have one piece exposed to extremes(for here,anyhow!)of heat and cold and no problems to report.And,despite what the weather channels may say,OUR thermometer reads in the plus 40C's on some days!
    These lightweight pieces would not really be possible without the mesh.I have samples to show people that I'm getting strength and waterproofness in a thickness of less than 1/4 of an inch.I can't explain the science.it just works.The engineering students would probably have the right words for the mechanic in all of us.Me,I'm just happy that it works!!!
    Cheers from here
    Rick

  • 17 years ago

    I'm not disagreeing with you making good stuff. Clearly you are. I use the fibreglass mesh too - it's great stuff!

    I'm disagreeing with the idea of using kevlar to reinforce concrete. Just because someone is an engineering student doesn't mean they're right (I used to work for an engineering department).

    I'm going to wait for one of the resident experts to set the record straight.

  • PRO
    2 years ago

    Hey guys! I’m looking to make some faux boulders for my yard. I’m looking for a cheaper alternative to quickwall. In the discussion regarding EIFS mesh, could this be used over plywood ribs, instead of lath, for exterior purposes? I’m hoping to keep them lightweight and free of cracking. We are anywhere from 20-97 degrees Fahrenheit, through the seasons.

0