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thomsonrooseva

monstera leaves turning brown

7 years ago

monstera leaves

Comments (10)

  • 7 years ago

    Which monstera do you have? And a pic or three would help a lot.

    Russ

  • 7 years ago

    Brown leaves usually means not enough water. I have one in my flat that is older than me. Water it more, maybe move it to an area with more light if you can (though mine grows just fine in a shady area) and mist the leaves.

  • 7 years ago

    Eva Thomson-Roos Stockholm Sweden thomsonrooseva@gmail.com

    Thanks for your replies! Actually my monstera is more than 25 years old. Most of it is ok but I probably gave it too much water some months ago and parts of it withered .The small recent problem is that I would like parts of it to grow more. But when I water it new small leaves arrive ok at the base but then parts of those leaves seem to rot eg they become brown/black. And noway will I move it to another area. It has always been in the same place eg inside a fairly dark room.

  • 7 years ago

    Sounds to me like it's still reacting to being overwatered. Is there any wilting of leaves going on? That would indicate that the roots for those particular vines are severely rotted.

    I love plants with history, and at 25 years old your monstera certainly has it's share of that. I hope you can figure out the solution to getting this old plant back on the road to health.

    Keep us posted if you wish.

    Russ

  • 7 years ago

    Thanks a lot both of you. I find Houzzo much to complicated to use and as for pictures I do not want even to try.

    Anyway reply: No I have never put Ariel roots in the soil have been told not necessary and up to now I have never done it and the plant has been perfectly happy. Will try with something close to a moss stick that I have and see what happens. Actually this is much too similar to caring for children and My Hoyas are much better off! Will tell you what happens and thanks again for your efforts!

    Eva

  • 7 years ago

    If you put a few of the Ariel roots in the soil, like the ones towards the top of the tree if they're long enough, this allows more water to get to the top to produce more growth. It's a tropical plant so in its natural habitat the Ariel roots would plant themselves in soil. It might make quite a difference. Worth a try. Same principle with moss stick, it's used to give the Ariel roots more access to water and produces humidity. Good luck :)

  • 7 years ago

    I didn't know this! I have a gargantuan monstera that is putting out tons of air roots. Now, I know I can put them into the soil.

    thank you for sharing that!

  • 7 years ago

    No problem Lauren :) You don't have to put them all in the soil, try out a few sporadic ones and see if it makes a difference. My parents have always been successful at growing these plants and never bothered doing anything with the Ariel roots, which their tree has loads of! but they also have loads of Windows in all directions and lots of sun. Mine, on the other hand, gets little light so it helps it to grow and the water get to the top more efficiently by bypassing the other stems. Any roots that come down on mine I put strait into the pot and they just plant themselves :) I love these trees/plants :)

  • 7 years ago

    Carole Anne, I just went to check and look what I found :

    I couldn't get a great picture because the leaves were in the way. But I didn't know they were that long!

    can I bend the really long one into the soil?

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