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gregbk
We had radiant in out last house for 10 years. We moved away 8 years ago and still own the house as a rental. The tenants love the heat as we did. I am a renovator so I did the radiant myself. I stapled up 1/2" pex up and down both sides of the joists about 3" down from the floor. It had hardwood ceramic and Carpet floors. No problem on the oak hardwood but it was already a 40 year old floor. This house didn't need humidity and it's in Alberta Canada. I put double bubble foil about an inch down under the tube and 6" of fibreglass insulation under that. The basement is just baseboard heaters also radiant. So just 2 zones. We loved the heat so much when we built our 4200 sqft house we went radiant. Underslab in garage and basement. We zoned it with 11 separate thermostats. It is also pex under the floors followed by double bubble foil and 6" of fibreglass insulation. We have tile and hardwood. We have been here 5 years with no problems. (I built the house myself). Upper 3 bathrooms are on one zone including under 2 showers. The hardwood is engineered walnut and approved for radiant. It is stapled down. Now we went with a fancoil too as we thought on could days the the in floor hydronic wouldn't be able to keep up as the walkout basement and main floor have West walls with floor to ceiling glass as does half of the upper floor and huge windows on most of the rest of the house. We went with triple glazed windows. We have not used the fancoil for heat but we do run the fan constantly for air circulation and humidity in conjunction with an HRV. I regret not just putting in a regular furnace and using the blower on that for air circulation as if the boiler ever goes down I have backup heat. I'm going to swap out the fan coil for a furnace when I add central air. The flow through humidifier I have is not keeping up with the needs of the house as the circulating air is not heated. I am going to replace it with an Aprilaire 240v steam humidifier as that one will work with room temperature air. The fellow who said not to use engineered floor because it is particle board is confusing this excellent product with laminated floor which of course is an inferior product. For those who think you can move the thermostat around or want to use a programmable thermostat. No. That's not how radian works. It takes a while to heat up and cool down so you set it and forget it. The thermostat never moves. Also for those that say that the temperature isn't right for temperature changes outside.... You need an outdoor reset. This is a sensor placed outside and wired into the system. Your boilers computer takes the changes in outside temperature and adjusts water temperature and heating times to compensate for cold temperatures coming or warming spells. The fellow who says it's not good for concrete as heat flows down? The concrete must be insulated underneath. I used 2.4" of Styrofoam SM under my basement slab. Hope that helps.
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James Lisac

one of the simple things with radiant heat is the warmest part of the house is the floor. If your feet are warm the rest will be too. I installed a closed loop system when I converted my garage to a living room, it is 26' x 23' and heated by just a 1500 watt system. Once the slab is up to temp the the call for heat is only twice a day for about 15 minutes each cycle (average outside temp is low 40) and the thermostat is set at 65, but remember that is the air temp and the floor is always slightly warmer.

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PRO
Bill Fry Construction - Wm. H. Fry Const. Co.

Here's a photo of hydronic tubing for the radiant heat system that is about to be covered in "mud" in a bathroom of a home built to Passive House standards.


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