Bee and Butterfly gardenRustic Landscape, Surrey

Design ideas for a rustic backyard mulch landscaping in Surrey for summer. —  Houzz
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This photo has 3 questions
terrihanlon wrote:Dec 14, 2013
  • Elaine Thornton

    we did this in our backyard (VA) after seeing it on a home improvement show last year and having just had 3 trees cut down. we treated the logs with a spray on sealant, and it looked great! The only downside is the hot, humid weather has changed the color of the log tops to a grayish color. But we didn't sand or anything before treating them. I would suggest either a thicker coat or more of a polyurethane type treatment to keep the wood looking more natural.


  • PRO
    Helen Rose Wilson Garden Design

    Hi there, sorry for the delayed response! This was done with well seasoned oak, completely untreated. Oak has its own preserving properties and provided you keep an eye on them for any signs of rot and cracking they should last for a number of years. They will fade to grey over time. These have been in for around 5 years and the kids still love them. Once the kids have grown up they can be left to grow interesting fungi and will provide and excellent habitat for wildlife. Add in ferns and hostas between them along with a few extra logs in between and you have an attractive stumpery.

sumbrz wrote:Sep 20, 2014
  • PRO
    Helen Rose Wilson Garden Design

    Hi there, sorry for the delayed response! This was done with well seasoned oak, completely untreated. Oak has its own preserving properties and provided you keep an eye on them for any signs of rot and cracking they should last for a number of years. They will fade to grey over time. This was done with a hole boring attachment to a mini digger usually used for digging deep holes for play equipment, failing this, a spade and a lot of energy will be needed to bury a third of each log in the ground. These have been in for around 5 years and the kids still love them. Once the kids have grown up they can be left to grow interesting fungi and will provide and excellent habitat for wildlife. Add in ferns and hostas between them along with a few extra logs in between and you have an attractive stumpery.

Melissa Tang wrote:May 30, 2014
  • fionabrackendale

    We have just done stepping logs in our children's school playground - a minimum of 1/3 of the log round needs to be buried in the ground.

    We didn't treat the cedar log rounds, as cedar takes a long time to decay.



What Houzz contributors are saying:

laurendunec
Lauren Dunec Design added this to Get the Kids Outside With Family-Friendly Backyard IdeasJun 11, 2018

2. Put the building blocks in place to inspire creative play. Hidden spaces in the garden with places to discover, and a few kid-oriented elements, offer more potential for adventure than a smooth lawn might. Leave some areas a little wild and allow room for kids to build a fort out of fallen branches or create their own secret hideaway. Plenty of natural elements can be repurposed for creative play — such as stumps lined up as a natural obstacle course — and age more attractively in the landscape than plastic toys.

amandapollard
Amanda Pollard added this to 13 Steps to a Kid-Friendly Garden Adults Will Love TooJul 21, 2016

1. Keep it natural. There’s often no need to buy specific items for kids to play with. Use your imagination and create simple play areas out of natural materials, such as these tree stumps, which would make a great obstacle course or seating area. Alternatively, place steppingstones across a lawn, and either leave them plain or paint and decorate them. When you’re chopping or pruning in the garden, don’t throw out the waste immediately. Leave it in a pile for your children to enjoy, or challenge them to make something amazing with it.

siffordgd
Jay Sifford Garden Design added this to 17 Wandering Paths That Take Joy in the JourneyOct 12, 2015

14. Who says paths can’t be fun and gardens are not for children? This raised path made of cut logs is a thoughtful way to engage those children who don’t seem to mind an occasional skinned knee. The vertical flower inflorescences add to this garden’s jubilant nature in a way that prostrate ground covers and weeping conifers couldn’t.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

victoriacalamari
Victoria Mueller added this to Landscape ideas14 hours ago

stepping stone, or bike skills area?? - near trailer

ohryohry
ohryohry added this to Do It For The KidsJul 22, 2019

Like adding the sense of adventure and ply for the little ones.

jenaryl
jenaryl added this to Outdoor ideasJul 3, 2019

i like the different stumps clustered like stools in an area

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