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House in Santa Lucia PreserveFarmhouse Sunroom, San Francisco

Detail view of screened porch.
Cathy Schwabe Architecture.
Photograph by David Wakely.

Inspiration for a country concrete floor and brown floor sunroom remodel in San Francisco with a standard ceiling —  Houzz
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This photo has 13 questions
mhgibbons wrote:Apr 3, 2012
  • sueborelli
    Love the subtle color...not too dark. Would you be able to tell me what color you used?
  • PRO
    Cathy Schwabe Architecture
    Hi
    I wish I could.
    We had a sample of another material - leather if memory serves- which we used as our model when testing out colors. The key here is to have a mock up created when the pour is happening. Obviously only possible if this is new concrete. We had 2 or 3 roughly two x two feet by a coupke of inch high skid forms which were filled with concrete during the pour if the floor. They were deeply tooled to create a gridded pattern for us to use for testing. Then by trial and error we created samples and because if was the same pour as the floor we could be assured that the results in the actual floor would be Ashlee close match. A good resource are he FuTon Cheng books on concrete and concrete finishes.
    Well illustrated with many tips and a good source of practical info and inspiration.
    Good luck.
    Cathy
Interior Designs by ME wrote:Jul 4, 2013
  • Tim Stewart
    The floor looks great. What type of finish was used after it was stained, and are you happy with it?
  • PRO
    Cathy Schwabe Architecture
    HI-
    A clear sealer was used - but I don't have the product information.
    Surtec is a good sealer company -- on other concrete floors I have used their FS-600 and also Natural Beauty as the finish coat - as it has a matte finish.
    I would recommend talking to someone at that company.,
    Thanks for the question --\
    Cathy
demtuc wrote:Sep 18, 2012
  • PRO
    Cathy Schwabe Architecture
    Hi -
    Thanks.
    The stain was a mixture of colors figured out in samples on the job -- to match a sample we had. It was a trial and error process with the samples. We had 5 or 6 samples prepared at the same time the floor was poured - using concrete from the pour, this is critical if you are going to try and match something and or work out an effect in advance so that the chemistry is the same -- and used these to experiment on. Unfortunately I don't have a color to give you - it is mixture of yellow and brown and some red.
    Best of luck --
    Cathy
  • demtuc
    Thank you so much! That is very helpful!
adorablebritt02 wrote:Aug 28, 2015
  • PRO
    Cathy Schwabe Architecture

    Hi,

    The doors are custom wood made by Davenport Mill in Davenport,CA.

    Details/design + hardware specified

    by my office.

    Great place - I have always enjoyed working with them. Contact person is Dave Lundberg.

    thanks,

    Cathy

bjulie317 wrote:Mar 30, 2015
  • PRO
    Cathy Schwabe Architecture

    Hi,

    Thanks for the compliment!

    You are looking at two different kinds of wood -- the interior ceiling is VGDF ( vertical grain douglas fir) with a clear finish - essentially 1 x 4, T + G flooring attached to the ceiling. The exterior porch ceiling is western red cedar - and is a continuation of what was used at the underside of the roof eaves - 2 x 6, T + G decking, square side down. No finish was used on this ceiling. Walls are also wood - same western red cedar - but here we painted the walls and then scraped the paint off while still wet - makes for a kind of modified wash.

    Thanks for the question.


    Cathy

gaymishelle wrote:Sep 28, 2013
  • PRO
    Cathy Schwabe Architecture
    Hi-
    This shot is taken looking into a screened porch -- so all of the openings in the room beyond the door portal are screened, with no glass. The lites to either side of the sliding doors - only one is shown in this shot are fixed glass. But typically the windows in this house are operable - either double hung and or in-swinging hoppers.
    Thanks for the question.
    Cathy
eskcs wrote:May 1, 2013
  • PRO
    Cathy Schwabe Architecture
    Hi-
    Benjamin Moore# 2153-50, Desert Tan is what was used -- it was painted on and then scraped off the wood walls in the porch so that it reads more lke a wash. the same color was used on the doors, windows and trim as well as on the sheet rock walls that are also visible in this photo.
    Thanks for the question.
    Cathy
hughandme wrote:Apr 9, 2013
  • PRO
    Cathy Schwabe Architecture
    Hi-
    I think that these chairs were likely ordered by the interior designer and unfortunately I no longer have her contact information. I think that these are Dakota Jackson chairs -- perhaps someone else in the Houzz community may have this answer.
    Thanks,
    Cathy
jhb24 wrote:Jan 15, 2013
  • PRO
    Cathy Schwabe Architecture
    Hi-
    The interior dimensions are roughly 9'-3" x 15'- 6" -- you can see much of the balance of the space in the photo of the hall looking towards this porch. The other end has a small table.
    Thanks for the question.
    Cathy
jjl558 wrote:Jul 30, 2012
  • PRO
    Cathy Schwabe Architecture
    Hi-
    Do you mean wood paneling over the cement ceiling?
    That can be done --
    I would gap the wood boards off of the cement with pressure treated furring strips and depending on how long concrete has been in place and what is above it ( exposed to elements and or completely protected from the elements) I would consider having a waterproofing layer applied onto the concrete first -- could be a peel and stick and or liquid applied material -- some of the liquid applied membranes chemically bond with the concrete and will also fill cracks ( xypex and vandex are two companies to consider) . And then I would make sure to vent the cavity behind the wood that is created by the gapped furring strips. How this is done depends on the condition at hand - walls below, edge of the ceiling as it transitions to a wall or roof above... The wood boards need to be finished on all sides -- even those that are concealed so that over time the boards do not warp as they absorb moisture on untreated sides differently than the treated ones.
    These are details that I would suggest having an architect in your area develop for you after looking at your situation. The will be able to help with selecting the right wood and making sure that the finished installation looks and performs over time the way you want it to.
    Best of luck,
    Cathy
bethro wrote:Jul 22, 2012
  • PRO
    Cathy Schwabe Architecture
    Hi -
    These doors are actually sliding doors -- not folding doors -- they slide on a track inside the porch and port over the fixed windows to either side. The doors were made by a Door + Window shop I cannot recommend enough -- Davenport Mill in Davenport, CA. The top track hardware is by Grant -- and I used a custom guide at the bottom of the door that interlocks with a piece on the sill to hold the doors from swinging out. 133 Marine View Avenue Davenport, CA 95017
    (831) 425-8577 and or www.davenportmill.com
    They are great -- do wonderful shop drawings too.
    - Cathy
Khos wrote:Mar 11, 2012
  • PRO
    Cathy Schwabe Architecture
    This is the great thing about design itself and also about one's choices about how to best arrange furniture, rugs, etc to best meet one's needs. There are many options and that is how it should be. I like to think that a good home design will permit -- many very different furniture layouts. Thanks for your thoughts,
    Cathy
lakeshat wrote:Jan 30, 2012
  • PRO
    Cathy Schwabe Architecture
    Hi -
    The doors between the LR and porch cannot be seen in this image -- when open they port exactly over the fixed windows. The are wood sash doors that are top hung on a heavy duty Grant track with a interlocking metal threshold piece that acts as a keeper so that they cannot swing out. I detailed the doors and they were made by a door and window shop in Davenport, CA ( Davenport Mill). They do lovely work and I recommend them highly. The porch doors and windows, also by Davenport Mill, use a screen infill instead of glass.
    Hope this helps -
    Cathy

What Houzz contributors are saying:

raenovate
Rachel Grace added this to The Ceiling Fan That Blows Away Ceiling Fans' Bad RapSep 28, 2012

In glossy white with a drop rod, the Cirrus pops against this sunroom's rich wood-paneled ceiling.

cathylara
Cathy Lara added this to Sunrooms Shine in Different WaysMar 1, 2012

A Reading NookThis sunroom's spartan furnishings and bare, floor-to-ceiling windows make for the perfect, distraction-free reading nook.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

lord_of_the_tacos
Lord oftheTacos added this to Screened porchApr 27, 2019

stained concrete (honey) exposed beams (ceiling)

kathyapplin
kathyapplin added this to Wish ListApr 6, 2019

Corner with chairs and fan sloshed ceiling similar to our room

sekelliher
sekelliher added this to SunroomFeb 12, 2019

I like the idea of a small reading nook with a view, all in 2 comfortable chairs and a small table

stephpfeiffer2
stephpfeiffer2 added this to AdditionJan 22, 2019

??? Idea for transition between old to new.

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