Wells Design Melbourne contemporary-landscape
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Wells Design Melbourne Contemporary Landscape, Melbourne

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http://www.wellsdesign.com.au
Design ideas for a contemporary hillside gravel landscaping in Melbourne. — Houzz

This photo has 7 questions

jbtracy wrote:
Were timber screws or rebar used to adjoin ties?
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Ralph Di Maio
Along with the railroad ties the large boulders really make this landscape interesting.
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PRO
Wells Design Landscapes
Thanks for you kind comments
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miles0012 wrote:
drainage - Do you recommend and include gravel and drainage pipes behind these types of walls?
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Yvonne Wells
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><md>Hi Miles, we only put drainage behind the timber retaining walls.

Thank you for your question
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riggs225

Thank you for the advice on retaining wall drainage!


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Hester Davies wrote:
LOVE the timber wall! - 1). Did you do anything to soften the dark, creosote look of the timbers? These don’t look as sticky and tar-covered. 2) Is the timber in front actually buried in concrete? Gorgeous!
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PRO
Wells Design Landscapes
Hi Hester,
Thanks for your questions
The timbers are old railway sleepers, no treatment , just aged.
Yes they are in Concrete.
I am glad you like this Garden , it’s one of my favorites too.
Yvonne wells
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Linda Volheim wrote:
wood retaining walls - I live in Wisconsin. would a wood retaining wall work well here?
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PRO
Wells Design Landscapes
Hi Linda

Thanks for your question.
The type of material used for retaining depends on a number of factors
- height and strength required
- aesthetic appeal
- durability requirement
The type of wood used in the photo was dense old hardwood recycled from railway sleepers. These were supported by upright sleepers slightly cantilevered and set in concrete to the same depth as the height of the wall from the ground.
This would have a life of about 15-20 yrs if it was drained from the rear using permeable medium such as gravel and agricultural drainage pipe.
I hope this helps you
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davidfox30 wrote:
What are those plants?? - Love this shot! It's exactly what we need for the bank out the front of our house... Does anyone know what any of those plants are?? We have a fairly rocky hot climate...
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Yvonne Wells
Hi David, the plants you are looking at are : the silver are Convolvulus Cneorum Silver Wedding Bush, Light Green ones are : Euphorbia, the dark green ground covers are: Arenaria Montana...what part of the world are you in?
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stephakbailey wrote:
What kind of wood was used on the retaining wall?
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marysimplifies
Looks like railroad ties.
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iaidogirl wrote:
plantings in a berm - I wonder why many berms on the Houzz website have sparse looking plantings. Is it first year plantings or are berms to control water run off supposed to be planted sparsely?
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What Houzz contributors are saying:

Balance Garden Design added this to Get an Edge: The Best Border Material for Your Garden
WoodThe sustainable choice that blends into natural surroundings.Pros: Wood can be cheap and easy to install, and it comes in a wide range of styles. Used in combination with other materials, it can help visually merge areas such as decking and pathways. Also, large wooden railroad ties cut into sections and set vertically can create a sense of drama and scale. Cons: When it comes to longevity, wood can fall short. Even the hardest of woods will eventually be eaten by termites or rot, especially in wetter climate zones.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

terriamato51 added this to Terri’s Landscape ideas
VI would like to use any large stones/rocks excavated on job site in garden design
Connie Kisvardai added this to Garden Landscaping
The integration of the rocks to form part of the retaining wall

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