Woodland garden 1 eclectic-landscape
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Woodland garden 1 Eclectic Landscape, Charlotte

Wind sculpture by Lyman Whitaker. Photo by Jay Sifford.
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http://www.siffordgardendesign.com
Photo of an eclectic landscaping in Charlotte. — Houzz

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RONNI POLLACK wrote:
I want that garden sculpture - Hello, I own one of LW sculptures and particularly love this one as well. Can you tell me the name of this piece so I can contact CODA who sells LW pieces in Palm Dessert. Thank you.
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Jay Sifford Garden Design
Hi Ronni. Aren't Lyman's pieces the best? I believe this one is lotus. As I said in the article, I love it because it turns in both directions. Which one do you have? Also, as I said, I love grouping them together in 3s and 5s. The effect is like a choreographed ballet. Good luck!
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What Houzz contributors are saying:

Jay Sifford Garden Design added this to Get Your Garden Moving for a Magical Mood
WindIt seems obvious that wind brings movement into our gardens, but how many of us appropriate wind as a design element? Harnessing the wind can bring magic to our spaces.Consider the mesmerizing motion of a good-quality wind sculpture like this one by artist Lyman Whitaker. Not all wind sculptures are created equal. Many of the less-expensive pieces on the market require much more than a gentle breeze to elicit movement. Well-designed pieces like this one dance when a breeze is barely noticeable to us. This particular piece sports two layers that spin in opposite directions, adding to the experience.I enjoy using these pieces in varying heights and styles, in multiples of three and five. The interplay between pieces is indeed like a choreographed ballet.
Jay Sifford Garden Design added this to Great Design Plant: Chamaecyparis Pisifera ‘Curly Tops’
Botanical name: Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Curly Tops’Common names: Curly Tops sawara cypress, Curly Tops false cypressOrigin: The Japanese islands of Honshu and KyushuWhere will it grow: Hardy to -30 degrees Fahrenheit (USDA zones 4 to 8; find your zone)Light requirement: Partial shadeWater requirement: Average to moist, well-drained soilMature size: Slow growing to 3 to 4 feet tall and wide
Jay Sifford Garden Design added this to How to Create a Zen-Inspired Garden
Simple, thoughtful art. I firmly believe that every well-designed garden should contain at least one piece of quality art. In the contemporary Zen garden, simpler is better. Avoid vivid hues and complex shapes — the tranquil spirit of your garden is at stake. Instead, choose simple pieces with organic shapes and colors that create a dialogue with other garden features. This simple wind sculpture by Lyman Whitaker has the organic shape of a lotus flower while repeating the essential hues of surrounding plants. It moves in the breeze, bringing another layer of interest to the venue.
Jess McBride added this to Bring a New Dimension to Your Home With Sculpture
8. A natural choice. You wouldn’t dare keep a painting or a photograph outdoors every day, but a sculpture made of stone, Cor-Ten steel, copper or even treated wood can stand proudly in the elements. This sculpture by Lyman Whitaker moves with the wind, acting as a wildlife deterrent in addition to being beautiful.More: Let’s Put a Price on Art: Your Guide to Art Costs and Buying
Lauren Dunec Design added this to Elevate the Garden With Understated Art Pieces
2. Natural form. Man-made works inspired by, say, the symmetrical wings of a butterfly or the vein pattern on a leaf look perfectly in keeping with a natural landscape. This weathered metal sculpture of an upturned blossom seems almost like an oversize waterlily floating above the shrubbery. Viewed from a distance, such sculptures could prompt a second look to see if the pieces are man-made or natural.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

C2run1 added this to Japanese Garden
Chamaecyparis Pisifera ‘Curly Tops’
Alexis Bumpass added this to E's & P's Alexis
Organic shapes contain leaves..Organic shapes are often found in nature, but man-made shapes can also imitate organic forms. Organic Shapes might or might not have leaves. Organic Shapes have irregular edges.
wishinguponastar added this to Plants
chamaecyparis pisifera or "curly top" cypress
jcerio added this to Garden Sculpture
2. Natural form. Man-made works inspired by, say, the symmetrical wings of a butterfly or the vein pattern on a leaf look perfectly in keeping with a natural landscape. This weathered metal sculpture of an upturned blossom seems almost like an oversize waterlily floating above the shrubbery. Viewed from a distance, such sculptures could prompt a second look to see if the pieces are man-made or natural.
Claire Severson for W.A. Brown & Associates added this to Exteriors
Consider the mesmerizing motion of a good-quality wind sculpture like this one by artist Lyman Whitaker. Not all wind sculptures are created equal. Many of the less-expensive pieces on the market require much more than a gentle breeze to elicit movement. Well-designed pieces like this one dance when a breeze is barely noticeable to us.

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