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kawaiineko_gardener

what can be grown in 3 gallon containers?

I bought two 3 gallon containers at a store today for 0.50 apiece. The containers are cylindrical in shape so I don't think it'll be feasible to do more than one row.

Unfortunately I don't know what the depth of the containers is. I can provide this information at a later date.

The rim of the diameter of these containers is 9"-10".

What I would like to know is how many of each type of vegetable can be grown in them?

This is a list of the type of veggies I'm interested in growing:

*carrots (these are not a long variety, but a shorter variety; they're called little finger and says on the back of the package they're ideal for container gardening)

*Cabbage (New Jersey Wakefield, says on the back of the package that it's ideal for container or perfect for people who have limited space with a small plot)

*Spinach

*Turnips

*Bush Green beans

*Bush variety of cucumber

( The variety is called space saver, which means the vines aren't as long as traditional cucumber varieties.Says on the back of the package that the fruit of the cucumber is 7"-8" long when it's fully mature)

*Icicle radish (this is a white radish and it's larger and longer than your typical red radish)

*Romaine Lettuce

Comments (9)

  • vrkelley
    14 years ago

    Here is what I grow in the 3gallon containers

    Spacemaster cucumbers
    Marketmore cucumbers
    Red Acre cabbage
    Jersey Wakefield cabbage

    Because the container is smaller, be sure to water often.

  • vrkelley
    14 years ago

    You'll need several containers of everything to feed two people. What most packages omit is the amount of horizontal and vertical space that is necessary.

    Cabbage 16" wide X 14" tall (not including container)
    Cucumber 14" wide X 12" tall

    Hope this helps. I just harvested my first Wakefield. The goal was a 2 pound cabbage. Mine was 1lb 9 oz. and it took 160 days from seed to eat.

  • kawaiineko_gardener
    Original Author
    14 years ago

    I would like to know if it's possible to grow root vegetables in 3 gallon containers. As stated previously the containers are cylindrical and the diameter of the rim of each container is 9"-10".

    How many carrots could I grow in the type of container I just described? I don't know the depth of the container but I assume that you could grow carrots in this container because you don't need to space them very far apart with plant spacing. My carrots are called little finger, they are a short variety; you only need to thin each 1"-2" apart.
    The length of my carrot variety would be 3" x 1" (this is when it's fully matured). The description on the back of the packet says "Ideal variety for container gardening".

    How many white radishes could I grow in the type of container I described? Once again with plant spacing once you've thinned the seedlings out, this is a vegetable where
    you don't need to space them very far apart; you only need to space each radish you're growing 1" apart.

    How many turnips could I grow in the type of container I described? You only need to space each of the seedlings with the variety of turnip I have 4" apart.

    Saying that "you would need several containers to grow each vegetable you want to grow". Doesn't really help much.
    All I would really like is a recommendation of how many of each type of vegetable I could grow that I listed in the type of container I have; even if it's just a guesstimate that would help tremendously. I am assuming that doing multiple rows in the type of container I have isn't an option, due to the fact that my container is cylindrical in shape, not rectangular.

    People have stated that they've grown cabbages and
    cucumber plants in 3 gallon containers. How many of each (typically) do you grow in each container (3 cabbage heads,
    2 cucumber plants, etc.; what I gave are merely examples).

    I am assuming that for a 3 gallon container you only grow one cucumber plant and one head of cabbage. How many heads of romaine lettuce (this is when it's fully mature) and
    how many spinach plants could you grow in a three gallon cylindrical container with the diameter of the rim 12"?

  • vrkelley
    14 years ago

    >>the diameter of the rim of each container is 9"-10".

    You are correct, maybe others just toss-out while planting. It's usually good go calculate how many each container can produce. To figure that out, I draw it out on paper/computer. Draw a line down the diameter of the container. For your bucket, that's 9" If the package says the roots need 1" your first row has:

    9 Seeds = 9
    6 Next rows on either side of the center = 12
    3 On the edge = 6
    27 TL MAX (remembering that you'll be able to eat some radishes while thinning them out).

    Calculate the rest of your veggies in the same way based on the seed package instructions. Remember that you can't usually plant right on the very edge of the container.

    I do 1 cabbage per 3 gallon container, and 2 container cukes per 3 or 5 gallon containers. As posted on another thread, I planted over 200 radishes in a large rectangular skid and they grew in our cooler weather, but failed to produce. Maybe you'll have better luck when the weather gets cooler.

    How about posting your yields sometime soon!!!

  • kawaiineko_gardener
    Original Author
    14 years ago

    Okay well unfortunately what you said to determine how many veggies can be grown in each container with your formula,
    it doesn't make any sense to me.

    I'm really bad with math, and anything numerically/computation oriented is basically clear-as-mud
    to me.
    The part that is the most confusing is this right here:

    9 Seeds = 9
    6 Next rows on either side of the center = 12
    3 On the edge = 6
    27 TL MAX (remembering that you'll be able to eat some radishes while thinning them out).

    I thought it wasn't possible to plant multiple rows in a cylindrical container because of the shape.

    You said with the container 6 rows on either side of the container is 12", 3 on the edge is 6" and you can have a maximum of 27. This makes no sense to me, and I'm very confused. Could you please elaborate and clarify?

    I know it's possible that I've mixed up the plant spacing in inches with how many actual plants I can plant per container. However as said I'm really confused and don't understand what you said.

    Thank you very much for trying to help. I really appreciate it. If you could explain more in detail what you just said it would help tremendously. Unfortunately it comes off as kind of vague to me; this isn't your fault, it's cause I'm very bad with anything that involves numbers or math....

  • rawb
    14 years ago

    vrkelly,
    very cool , now thats info I can use... 2 cuke plants in a 5 gal. bucket? Is the yield the same has if they each had their own container? What zone you in?

  • vrkelley
    14 years ago

    >> Is the yield the same has if they each had their own container?

    Yes. Your mileage may vary. Please post back your results on this thread...Cuke variety, container size, yield.

    >>kawaiineko_gardener I'm very confused
    Just prepare the bucket with your soil. Plant the first "row" down the middle of the bucket. There's left over space on both sides...now fill those in with shorter rows.

    Remember for radishes, your "rows" are going to be a few inches apart, not 36 inches like a garden.

  • kawaiineko_gardener
    Original Author
    14 years ago

    Well I understand the concept now that you've explained it with the rows. You're basically saying two rows on the right and left hand sides down the center and rows on the right and left hand sides on the sides of the container. Is this right?
    If not, then please clarify.

    Unfortunately what I STILL don't understand is the figures you gave me. I understand that you're suggesting to make two rows in the center and two rows on the sides; one row on the left side, one on the right. What I don't understand
    is how far apart to space the "rows" in the center.

    Another thing I don't get is the figures you gave. Were you just giving them as examples to try and clarify what your idea was, or was this actual row and plant spacing
    for one of the vegetables I gave you.

    Here is the row and plant spacing for the veggies I plan to plant (this is directly from the seed packet info on the back of the seed packets I have).

    What I REALLY don't get is the figures you gave here:

    9 Seeds = 9
    6 Next rows on either side of the center = 12
    3 On the edge = 6
    27 TL MAX (remembering that you'll be able to eat some radishes while thinning them out).

    I thought it wasn't possible to plant multiple rows in a cylindrical container because of the shape.

    If you could PLEASE give clarification with the figures you gave, I'd appreciate it. I would like to try your idea. Unfortunately parts of it are still confusing me. I can't apply what I don't understand.

    I gave the row and plant spacing for my seed varieties as a reference because I didn't know whether or not the numbers you gave were just as a general example or referring to one of the vegetables I want to grow.

    Parris Island Cos Lettuce:

    Row spacing:18" (1-1/2 ft)
    Plant spacing: 12" per plant

    Turnips:

    row spacing:1-1/2 to 2 ft apart
    Plant spacing:4" per plant (this is after the seedlings have been thinned)

    Carrots (little finger variety which is a shorter variety than a regular carrot):

    Row spacing:I don't know; the seed packet doesn't say
    Plant spacing:1"-2" (this is after you've thinned the seedlings out)

    spinach:

    Row spacing:1-1/2 to 2 ft.
    Plant spacing: 6" per plant (this is after the seedlings have been thinned out)

  • vrkelley
    14 years ago

    Yes it looks like you understood most of my note. The row spacing gives you enough space to walk down the rows. So skip the row spacing stuff on the package.

    Probably the best way to get the row spacing is to search this forum or Google for Square Foot Gardening. Of course the plants would love MORE space if they can get it.

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