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paul__gw

Hoya tsangii ... I'm rather underwhelmed truth be told

15 years ago

As far as hoya flowers go, I would have to say these are far from impressive, IMO. Each flower is maybe the same diameter as the eraser on top of a pencil. Its only real saving grace is the fragrance -- smells like butter cream to me.


Those aren't water drops on the flowers -- rather flowers produce a lot of nectar. (With some species, I understand, this can be a problem indoors as some types are such prodigious producers that they drip all over anything beneath them.)

With higher light the leaves get a pnk/red cast.

No real reason for this pic -- just liked the reflection in the nectar drop.

Comments (25)

  • 15 years ago

    It is beautiful, but like you said, too much nectar is not good for another plants, for me, this one will attract ants to my greenhouse. I did not get this one yet, still thinking.
    Thanks for posting
    sue

  • 15 years ago

    This was my first Hoya and I will always love this species. The flowers may be small but there can be hundreds of them open at one time on a larger plant and the fragrance is also very nice. The blooms produce lots of nectar but they don't drip. Sometimes I do wish I had my plant hung up high so I could see the flowers from below. This is hands down my most frequently blooming Hoya. I like the red leaves on your plant I may try moving mine to a slightly brighter spot to see if I can get more colour on the leaves.

    I have recently added several other Hoyas from the Acanthostemma section to my collection including Hoya davidcummingii, micrantha, loheri, brevialata and sigillatis. I have really taken a liking to these smaller Philippine Hoya species.

    Mike

  • 15 years ago

    I'm with Mike. My plant is very large and rambling. It spills out of the pot and has attached itself to many supports and climbed way up the wall and into orchid baskets and all sorts of places where it "drips' down again. When it blooms it has too many flower bunches to count.

  • 15 years ago

    Paul,

    I'm surprised to hear you're "underwhelmed" by tsangii. I like it so much, I have three of them. A HUGE one, a BIG one and a smallish one. The two larger bloom almost constantly for me - a very redeaming quality. I detect no scent whatsover with mine, but those little bloom clusters are sweet to observe. And like Mike said, it's a reliable bloomer - not something you can count on with all Hoyas. But I especially appreciate the foliage - the leathery, olive green leaves with the black edges and coppery tones (with some sun.)

    But I know what you mean - we all appreicate different Hoyas for different reasons. Linearis and retusa are two I don't really get lit up about. They're intersting, mind you, but not very "Hoya-ish" in my opinion. I like serpens and curtisii, but they're both a magor pain in the butt as far as I'm concerned. Both are a little too tempermental for my taste. I still have a bit of both and if/when I lose them, I won't be particularly disheartened...

    It's always interesting to see how tastes vary so much, though!

    Denise in Omaha

  • 15 years ago

    Paul,

    Took this picture at H.depot the other day, to do some research on it, didn't buy it since I didn't know anything about them. Apparently this is one of those "mislabled" EA hoyas. As you can clearly see, the label says Bilobota...Is this actually tsangii, or DS-70? Is Bilobota and tsangii one and the same? Thanks!

    By the way those pictures are pretty neat especially the one with the nectar all over them. If I do decide to get it, its definitely staying outside, LOL.

    Can you please tell me how much direct sun you give yours? I do love the red leaves on them...

    Hoya For sale at H. Depot...(Not mine yet...)
    {{gwi:982647}}

  • 15 years ago

    Pug,

    One of mine is grown above carpet, the other above a wood floor. I've never found any of the sap on either carpet or wood, so it apparently doesn't get heavy enough to drip. This is true of most of the Hoyas I grow. Kerrii is the only one that is a real nuisance for dripping for me. Perhaps there's a difference in "drippage" if they're watered a bit more? Or less?? (I don't let mine get terribly dry.)

    Denise in Omaha

  • 15 years ago

    Actually, the name of this hoya is DS-70, not tsangii (or bilobata). Tsangii is the same as H. odetteae, and it has yellow blooms.

    Gorgeous pics Pug and and Paul!

    Gabi

  • 15 years ago

    Gabi I just got the new reprint of The World Of Hoyas by Dale Kloppenburg that has colour photos instead of photocopies of the plants. Both Hoya tsangii and Hoya odetteae are listed as separate species and from the photos they are quite different although they are both from the same section. Here I though I was on my way to figuring out the whole Hoya DS-70/tsangii mess but I guess that was not the case. From what Mr. Kloppenburg says this species was described under several names including tsangii, Hoya sp. Phillip. JP- and Hoya DS-70, DS standing for David Silverman. The name he is using in the book is Hoya tsangii as the other names were just given to unidentified plants when they were collected that just happened to all be the same species. I wonder if the yellow flowered Hoya tsangii listed in David Liddle's catalog is really the Hoya odetteae shown in Kloppenburg's book?

    Mike

  • 15 years ago

    Yes, it's definitely a mess to be figured out. I do know that Kloppenburg does not have the greatest reputation with certain people, but it's still a mystery to be figured out. If I remember, I will be sure to get the H. tsangii that DL sells the next time I place an order. I wish we knew of someone on here that has it. I'll ask around and see if I can find out if anyone has it.

    Gabi

  • 15 years ago

    Denise, thanks for letting me know about the nectar dripping not being a real issue. Most of my hoyas just happens to be outside because its just easier for me, and I don't have a lot of room to grow them inside. But its helpful to know that I won't be ruining the carpet on the few occasions that I will have to bring them in the house for inclement weather.

    Gabi, thanks for the name explanations, so does that mean there is no such thing as a real "Bilobota", is this a name that belongs mostly to EA? I'm so confused, but that's normal for me, LOL... Thanks!

  • 15 years ago

    Yes, it does get confusing!

    There is such a hoya as H. bilobata.

    Gabi

  • 15 years ago

    Since this is a discussion of H. tsangii I will post this here. I do not mean to hijack this thread.

    I just purchased an EA hoya at Home Depot that is labeled as Hoya "Green Leaf". This plant looks somewhat like H. tsangii but I'm not sure. The plant does not have any blooms so I have no way to tell. I already have a H. tsangii so I really don't need another. Has anyone else seen the hoya labeled as "Green Leaf"? Any guess as to its identity?
    Thanks,
    Mike

    Thanks,
    Mike

  • 15 years ago

    Mike,
    I think it's H. lacunosa. If you post a pic, that would help. But just google lacunosa and you'll see if it's the same. Great hoya, and great smelling flowers...also a very eager bloomer. I'll post a link below to a site that shows pictures of the foliage and blooms. Oh, it likes to stay on the moist side.

    Gabi

    Here is a link that might be useful: hoyas

  • 15 years ago

    Hi Gabi,
    Thanks, but unfortunately the plant is not H. lacunosa. I know what lacunosa looks like and this plant is not H. lacunosa. I was actually looking for H. lacunosa when I went to HD. (:o) I will try to post a pic of the plant in a bit. I think I may have found a garden club friend who has H. lacunosa and I am going to her place tomorrow to take a look at the plant.
    Thanks,
    Mike

  • 15 years ago

    So I posted on DG to see if anyone had info on this, or if anyone had the real tsangii from David Liddle.

    Mark Randall (of Stemma) gave some great information and also some pics that he said I can use.

    Here's what he said:
    "Tsangii is the officially the one that used to be called "odetteae", and the old "tsangii" now reverts to H. sp. DS-70.
    It is a weird thing: Christine Burton meant to name DS-70 "tsangii", but she named the wrong holotype herbarium sheet, which actually is material of the old "odetteae", so the name tsangii goes to the small creamy-yellow colored flowered plant."

    Here is his picture of the official H. tsangii, which belongs to Mark:

    This is what he said about sp. DS-70:
    "Hoya sp. DS-70: no official name yet, though some consider it to be a variety of Hoya burtoniae, which is similar but with darker leaves and slightly differently sized/colored flowers."

    And here is his picture of sp. DS-70 (so this seems to be the one that EA falsely sells as "bilobata"):

    {{gwi:982650}}

    So that should hopefully help with the confusion of H. tsangii, H. odetteae and H. sp. DS-70!
    Hope this info helps....and a big THANKS to Mark for helping out.

    Gabi

  • 15 years ago

    Mike,

    Hmmmm...the only other one that I think goes by that name is H. nummularioides (small fuzzy leaves). If you found that, then good find!

    Gabi

  • 15 years ago

    Hi Gabi,
    No, it's not H. nummularioides either. The more I look at the plant the more I'm convinced that it's H. tsangii/H. DS-70. Bummer.
    What is with Garden Web and rejecting messages? GW really needs to update their software into the 21st century. I post and someone answers and when I try to post a response it rejects my message saying I have already posted.
    Thanks,
    Mike

  • 15 years ago

    Oh, the rejection is because you can't post twice in a row. When that happens, just give it a different title (like I did with my second post to you, since I just posted right before that).

    I really think it's nummularioides over H. sp. DS-70. Reason being is that EA tags their hoyas a certain way, and H. sp. DS-70 is always tagged H. bilobata (scroll up and you'll see a picture of the tag it comes with). If your hoya is small-leafed, roundish, and pubescent (fuzzy), then it's most likely nummularioides..."green leaf" is what they call that hoya. If it's labeled "green leaf" then the only way it can be sp. DS-70 is if the labels were switched! Either way, good luck with your new hoya.

    Gabi

    P.S. check out the link to the thread below. But again, if you are looking at your plant and really think it's sp. DS-70, then you'd know better. Looking forward to seeing a picture.

    Here is a link that might be useful: EA nummularioides

  • 15 years ago

    Hi Gabi,
    Here are a couple of photos of the plant:

    The label and a couple of leaves: (sorry, the pic is a little (a lot) blurry.)

    Here is a pic of just the leaves:

    I'm pretty sure it's H. tsangii. What's your opinion?
    Thanks,
    Mike

  • 15 years ago

    Hi Gabbi,
    I was getting the rejection after you had posted a reply to my message. When I posted again, my message should not have been rejected since you had posted after I had posted. I know that I will need to change the title for this post since I am posting twice in a row. GW really needs to update their software to allow us to edit our posts after we have submitted them. Oh well, I'm pretty sure that will never happen. (:o)
    Mike

  • 15 years ago

    Well now I see what you mean. It does look like sp. DS-70...the shape of the leaves and also the undersides that I see on the right of the picture. I guess the tags really DID get switched!! But I'm no expert since I do not own sp. DS-70, so hopefully others will chime in now that you have a picture up.

    Gabi

  • 15 years ago

    How lucky you all are. My hoyas all "bit the dust" - I salvaged just a small cutting of one plant and I'm hopeful it will thrive.
    I'm also having trouble finding hoyas to purchase and keep seeing those of you who are buying them at Home Depot - I have NEVER seen one there.
    Treasure those blooms - some of us just live vicariously through your stories.

  • 15 years ago

    Mike your EA plant is Hoya DS-70 a species that was collected in the Philippines. Plants produce different leaf sizes and colours in response to different environmental factors like light and humidity levels. Most of the Hoyas we grow are propagated from cuttings so they are nothing more than clones of the initially wild collected material. If someone were to go collect many of the Hoyas we currently grow from the wild they would find variations on plant size, flower size and colour. When a plant is grown from seed it is an individual but when we trade cuttings we are in reality all growing the same plant. Exotic Angel propagates it plants vegetatively as well.

    Mike

  • 15 years ago

    Hi all,
    Thanks, I will mark the plant as DS-70 and will also change the label on my old plant from tsangii to DS-70.
    Mike

  • 15 years ago

    Paul-
    Fabulous photos of those "underwhelming" flowers! What camera are you using?
    Wish mine would bloom!
    Kelly

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