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11aob09

Flooring Transition is Tripping hazard

11aob09
7 years ago
last modified: 7 years ago

Hi. I just had my kitchen remodeled (by a contractor) and opened up to the dining room and we were hoping to have an inlaid turned board as the transition between wood and tile but the tile was slightly higher than the wood level and so we had to do a slanted wood type of threshold (not sure of the exact term). The problem is that the top of that board is even a little higher than the top of the tile and is now becoming a tripping hazard as you walk out of the kitchen. The kids have already tripped badly and it hurts if you step ontop of it barefoot. Is there anything that can be done - professional or diy - to help this?? Our contractor said its the best he can do and our handyman agreed but I feel like there's got to be a better solution.

Love to hear your thoughts. Thanks!

Comments (13)

  • Sherry8aNorthAL
    7 years ago

    Do you have a picture before the trim strip was put down?

  • 11aob09
    Original Author
    7 years ago

    Thanks Sherry. Yes, not in great detail but you can see the wood went right up to the tile, though not on same level exactly so wasn't an option to leave it.

  • 11aob09
    Original Author
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I also should mention its possibly made trickier by the fact that the floor isn't entirely level so the tile edge is a little higher in some places than in others along that transition line. Still seems like there's got to be something better that can be done. Maybe just sanding down this transition board we have??

  • PRO
    Uptown Floors
    7 years ago

    That kind of situation has always created problems when a difference in vertical height is created. Add the fact it's also inconsistent from one side of the doorway to another. It's too late now to fix properly or easily.

    Ideally they should have shimmed the hardwood side before the installation so it sits flush with the tile. BUT, not having the same vertical height across the doorway ....

    Nope, the new tiled area should have been prepped to accept a reasonable transition because it appears the hardwood has been there for years?

    You could try to shape/sand the transition, but it's likely to be too thin in areas where it would crack when walked on.

    Hopefully others can chime in with something I haven't thought of.

    11aob09 thanked Uptown Floors
  • 11aob09
    Original Author
    7 years ago

    Thanks! The wood floors are original so they were not installed during this renovation. When they started work they thought that they could get the tile at the same level as the wood but obviously that didn't pan out. Is it not possible to get transition boards that are thinner? or without a lip? The real problem is where the lip of it goes over the tile. Seems like you could get a board that is only a slope up to the level of the tile?

  • Sherry8aNorthAL
    7 years ago

    I have the same problem in my house. Both baths had vinyl flooring and we had tile put down. The sub floor had to be fixed because of the toilet leaking. Main bath, the tile is completely above the wood floor in the hall. We put down a molding that is similar to yours. I've never liked it. The master bath, the tile is level with the wood floor. The installer left a gap between the wood and the tile and I haven't ever figured what would look ok. I have thought of using grout to fill in between the two. Also, getting a piece of oak and trimming to fit in the gap. I would let it run across the door and perpendicular to the wood floor. It would have to be very small in width. Could you do the same with yours? That could be sanded to fit the changes in depth. The kitchen still has the metal between the wood floor of the den and the vinyl of the kitchen. (Also don't like) If yours could be level with the kitchen????????????

    11aob09 thanked Sherry8aNorthAL
  • 11aob09
    Original Author
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    We were even wondering if maybe its possible to have a portion of our wood flooring cut out to inlay something that would slope up...? Or is that just going to create more problems?

  • millworkman
    7 years ago

    "These milled pieces can be 3-6" wide (yours looks to be the standard 2") with a kind, gentle slope. "


    Was just going to add the same thing. I skilled woodworker with a shop should be able to accomplish this is short order. However singe you transition is not level side to side, some field modification with a power or hand plan and some sandpaper may be required to complete the proper fit.

  • 11aob09
    Original Author
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Thanks so much to both of you. Any suggestions on how to go about doing this? What should i look for in finding a molding company/woodworker for this? Or do i need to find a contractor that is into this idea in the first place? I am located in MD/DC area. Thanks again

  • millworkman
    7 years ago

    If you are in a metro area as it sounds look up woodworking shops on the internet. Maybe even a custom cabinet or door shop as they would have the tools and should have the ability. However if you need someone to handle the whole magilla as far as laying out it out, drawing it and installing it, you would need to find a real trim/finish carpenter. And for that the best thing in my opinion is to troll custom home construction sites and try and find names either by asking or numbers on trucks and vans and digging around for reputation.

  • lazy_gardens
    7 years ago

    The solution is to scribe the transition strip and remove wood so it's the same height as the tile on the tile side. I've had to do this because no two rooms in this house are at the same level.


    11aob09 thanked lazy_gardens
  • rwiegand
    7 years ago

    This has happened many times in our multiply remodeled houses. What I've always done is to make a transition strip out of wood that is 4-6" wide that results in a smooth slope between the two heights rather than a bump. The bigger the height difference, the longer the transition needs to be. Once I had to make up an inch, so I made that one a foot wide. I don't have a great process for creating these; typically I will rough a board (or assembly of boards) to close to the needed dimensions using some combination of jointer, planer, and bandsaw then bring it down to the exact dimension with a hand plane. This can take a couple hours and requires some patience with lots of fitting and testing if it's not a simple bevel, but it seems to work out well.

    11aob09 thanked rwiegand