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mcgoverntheory

Is the following true regarding quartz countertops?

mcgoverntheory
4 years ago
last modified: 4 years ago

Despite the brand, composition, hardness, heat resistance, etc are all the same. The only material difference between brands such as Cambria, Silestone, etc are minor differences in warranty and major differences in price?

If not, what am I missing?

Comments (18)

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    4 years ago

    You're missing nothing. Cambria is the style innovator.

  • PRO
    Interior Elements
    4 years ago

    main difference is the color selection for each company. If you find a unique color you like, go for it. If you are wanting just a plain white quartz, any company will be fine.

  • pittsburrito
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    There are differences in that some quartz are NSF certified as safe for food contact, and others are NSF certified as "splash zone only" (i.e. not safe for food contact). Be sure to look yours up on the NSF product list to make sure it is certified as safe for where you want to use it.

    There are differences within a brand too, so it must be looked up color specific.
    For example, MSI has 10 quartz colors NSF certified as food contact safe, while all their other colors are certified "splash zone only." Also, Consentino's Silestone quartz is NSF certified as food contact safe, but their ECO by Consentino line of quartz is certified "splash zone only."

    You just need to be aware that not all quartz is certified as safe for kitchen use (depending on the chemical compounds used in the resins), but if you are looking for quartz for your bathroom, any is fine.

    http://info.nsf.org/Certified/food/Listings.asp?TradeName=quartz&;

  • Lisa
    4 years ago

    ECO by Consentino is not quartz. It is a new product made from recylced materials such as glass, earthenware, etc.

  • pittsburrito
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    It is being claimed as quartz:

    https://www.lowes.com/pd/ECO-by-Cosentino-White-Diamond-Quartz-Kitchen-Countertop-Sample/50142009

    And can be found on the NSF quartz product listing as not certified for food contact. Everyone needs to do their research on the product they choose, because anyone will sell you quartz -- their food won't be in contact with it, just yours.

  • GreenDesigns
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    There’s also the quartz crystal composition size issue. The stones with a very fine quartz “flour” have many more issues than do the larger aggregate size. Because there’s far more resin in it. The 93/7 ratio is mostly marketing BS, and even the name manufacturers err on calling it that when that is by weight, not volume. In the experimental import brands, the ratio can be off even more, or include unknowns and impurities in the aggregate. Or cheap unknown resins.

    There’s also the fact that the import low priced options are not made with true Breton technology, and errors in resin cure time or compaction have created problems that essentially have no cure after installation in a kitchen but removal and start over. Since there is no real warranty support on those imports, consumers are left holding the bag for choosing a budget choice that costs them more than twice what choosing the name brands might cost.

  • Isabel
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    I cannot find Silestone on NSF. What’s up?! Thanks

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    4 years ago

    It's the same stuff as all that have NSF designation; I wouldn't worry.

  • pittsburrito
    4 years ago

    It actually depends on the color. So a manufacturer can produce some quartz that is food contact safe and other quartz that is not. On their website they can show that they are NSF certified, but until you look up the color with NSF, you won't know what the certification is -- food safe or splash zone only.


    Here is Silestone's (it is made by Consentino):

    http://info.nsf.org/Certified/food/Listings.asp?Company=0C410&;

    I had fallen in love with their ECO White Diamond quartz, but couldn't use it, because it is not certified food contact safe. I used Hanstone's Specchio White ibstead, which is similar.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    4 years ago

    How does a germ know what color countertop it's on please?

  • pittsburrito
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    It's not about germs. It's about the chemicals used in the resins of that particular color and whether those chemicals are safe for food contact.

  • PRO
    The Cook's Kitchen
    4 years ago

    ECO contains recycled content that cannot be 100% certified as food safe. That’s why the designation cannot be applied. In reality, it’s as safe as anything.

  • Isabel
    4 years ago

    Thank you Joseph. Thank you Pitts. Very interesting, The Cooks Kitchen.

  • palmtree7653
    4 years ago

    I was trying to find the NSF rating for Silestone Desert Silver but I can't find it on any of the links above. Am I missing something. It appears none of the Silestone quartz are food safe?

  • pittsburrito
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    I couldn't find it either (which could mean NSF is still in the process of testing it?), but the tiny asterisk on the back cover of Silestone's print brochure gives me pause: "To obtain more information about hues with NSF certificate, please visit www.nsf.org" As if they can't be honest about this themselves on their own Silestone website? Cosentino/Silestone knows which hues are certified as Food Safe, and the fact that they even hedge (or duck and run?) on this point means they definitely do have hues that are not food safe. Otherwise their print advertising literature would read differently!

    You might try calling them to inquire? 786.686.5060

    I don't know that I'd feel comfortable with just a verbal affirmative, though. I'd ask for a copy of their documentation certificate from NSF on that particular hue, if they can't get NSF to post it on the NSF website (which is updated daily).

  • K R
    4 years ago

    I have both MSI quartz and Cambria quartz in my house, done last year in a full home renovation. I will say Cambria is far superior to the MSI. I don’t baby anything at all (and we cook 6 out of 7 days and sit at the counter too) and I haven’t even a smallish chip in my kitchen (where I have the Cambria) whereas in my bathroom where I have the MSI I have quite a few little chips that honestly I have no idea how they even got there. I also see staining easier. My Cambria feels hard like granite, and the MSI feels softer. Hope this helps.

  • palmtree7653
    4 years ago

    I emailed the NSF and none of the colors listed are "food safe" only splash zone safe. I asked about why the Silestone Desert Silver isn't listed and was told to contact Silestone to ask about their color not listed. I assuming since none are food safe then Desert Silver would not be as well.