Casa Morada tropical-landscape
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Casa Morada Tropical Landscape, Miami

URL
http://www.raymondjungles.com
Inspiration for a tropical backyard landscaping in Miami. — Houzz

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Piper Lindeen wrote:
is this crushed limestone? ... - how well does it work as a path or patio?
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Michael Biskupich
Looks like possible crushed shell , or coquina shell
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designideas4me

The path is DG

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e_hernandezcoulton wrote:
The plant that looks like a fan is amazing, never seen it before - What is it called?
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designideas4me

The plant is a Fan Palm

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What Houzz contributors are saying:

Steve Asbell added this to How to Make Your Oceanfront Garden Thrive
Use local materials. Using locally sourced landscaping materials is not only environmentally friendly, but it will save you money and look a lot more natural. Why work against your landscape, especially when so many excellent materials are right under your nose? This Florida Keys landscape design by Raymond Jungles is an excellent example; crushed limestone creates a permeable and striking walkway that glows in the moonlight. Native stones can also be used to create stone pavers, statuary and stucco. Coquina stones, for example, are made up of the remains of tiny coquina clamshells and have long been utilized in northeastern Florida as both stone blocks and an element of a stucco known as tabby. In Pacific coast areas, volcanic stones such as basalt are a useful and workable addition to gardens. Native plants are useful even in their afterlife, lending regional flavor via hardwoods for building, palm fronds for thatching and leaves and needles for mulching.
Falon Land Studio LLC added this to Erosion Control for Your Seaside Garden
Behind the foredune is the area known as the back of the dune or landward side of the dune. This area receives less salt spray than the foredune, but plants used here must still be salt and drought tolerant. Depending on where you live, the subsequent ecological zones of the beach might spread into a high-dune ecosystem, or they may transition into a maritime forest with trees and large shrubs. Sea grape (Coccoloba uvifera), one of my personal favorites, is an excellent back-of-dune plant native to Florida.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

lenoralink added this to lenoralink's ideas
contrasting colors of tall grasses
jasumara added this to florida home
Use local materials. Using locally sourced landscaping materials is not only environmentally friendly, but it will save you money and look a lot more natural. Why work against your landscape, especially when so many excellent materials are right under your nose? This Florida Keys landscape design by Raymond Jungles is an excellent example; crushed limestone creates a permeable and striking walkway that glows in the moonlight. Native stones can also be used to create stone pavers, statuary and stucco. Coquina stones, for example, are made up of the remains of tiny coquina clamshells and have long been utilized in northeastern Florida as both stone blocks and an element of a stucco known as tabby. In Pacific coast areas, volcanic stones such as basalt are a useful and workable addition to gardens. Native plants are useful even in their afterlife, lending regional flavor via hardwoods for building, palm fronds for thatching and leaves and needles for mulching.

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