Front Ridge ResidenceTraditional Landscape, Boston

A rural hillside residence in Downeast Maine serves as a model for regenerating fragmented native plant communities and restoring damaged site systems. Sensible land management practices guide the homeowner’s efforts to rehabilitate expansive areas of mown lawn. Spaces carved from the landscape overlook stunning panoramic regional views, while new plantings define edges and thresholds. Brilliant seasonal drama is heightened along mown paths meandering through a rich tapestry of managed native meadow.

Inspiration for a traditional landscaping in Boston. —  Houzz
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talon wrote:Mar 28, 2014
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    Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design LLC
    This photo was taken in Penobscot, Maine--at one of our projects. It's a spectacular property in Downeast Maine, one of our most favorite places ever. The mountain in the right of the image is Blue Hill Mountain, and the range on the left is Acadia National Park on Mount Desert Island--specifically Cadillac Mountain. Sublime!

What Houzz contributors are saying:

lolalina
Laura Gaskill added this to Simple Pleasures: The Luxury of TimeSep 19, 2017

Watch the clouds. Once you’ve found a few pockets of time, what do you do? One of my favorite mini-mindfulness activities that can be practiced just about anywhere is cloud watching. If you’re in an office building, look out a window or step outside and look up, and then soften your gaze and simply notice the clouds overhead. Take some deep breaths, and relax into the moment.

aislin_gibson
Aislin Gibson added this to 3 Chores to Do Now to Prep Your Garden for Winter and SpringAug 24, 2017

Once they’ve grown, be sure to till these cover crops into the soil two to three weeks before spring planting so that the plants have time to decompose and build up your soil.

benjaminvogt
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens added this to 8 New Ways to Garden This YearDec 19, 2014

Get out into nature to discover new plants and design combinations. If you’re going to be using more natives, then I strongly suggest getting out into local wilderness areas to see what’s growing. Find a spot that matches your general garden conditions — dry, shady, wet or sunny — and observe what’s naturally growing there. If don’t know what a plant is, take a photo and ask your local university extension to identify it, or download any number of helpful plant I.D. apps for your phone. Consider also visiting local botanical gardens or demonstration gardens that feature native plants in a design setting. It’s not a guarantee that the plant will do well for you since the soil life will likely be different in your garden, but it’s a much safer bet than coddled plants in fertilized nursery pots.

benjaminvogt
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens added this to Lessons in the Rewards of Selfless GardeningMar 12, 2014

Mow to a point. I still have some lawn, fine fescue, and I often let it grow up to a foot in summer. I might mow a path through it or create whimsical islands of wind-blown grass. I like the look, and I know the taller grass is supporting a bit more life and conserving soil moisture. Why do I need a manicured lawn? Why do I need a lawn, period? What and who am I supporting when I mow and water and treat this lawn with fertilizers?How to Replace Your Lawn With a Garden

mitchell_parker
Mitchell Parker added this to Designing for Pleasure: The Beauty of MovementAug 13, 2013

Imagine yourself in a meadow on a lovely spring day. The sky is blue, flecked with cottony white clouds drifting slowly toward the horizon. The world around you changes continuously. Grasses take on a slightly different color as the sun shifts, rocks cast shadows here and there as the direction of the light hitting them changes, and a fallen leaf that looked dewy in the morning may be crispy by nightfall. This gentle movement is a primary element of biophilic design. In other words, nature isn't static, so your home shouldn't be either. Most home interiors have been designed to make movement within the structure invisible or imperceptible. It's time to change that.

becky
Becky Harris added this to Landscape Tour: Two Acres of Rural Hillside in MaineMar 5, 2012

"You can see the entire region from the house," says Cunningham. "To the left you see Acadia National Park; to the right, Blue Hill Mountain. The hayfield adds a beautiful foreground to the expansive view.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

grcanty
George C. added this to Farmhouse Landscaping Sample book.Aug 30, 2018

Nice example of multi-tiered view from house facing east.

sammyberries
sammyberries added this to WORDSOct 12, 2017

Watch the clouds. Once you’ve found a few pockets of time, what do you do? One of my favorite mini-mindfulness activities that can be practiced just about anywhere is cloud watching. If you’re in an office building, look out a window or step outside and look up, and then soften your gaze and simply notice the clouds overhead. Take some deep breaths, and relax into the moment.

duchessobvious
Alexandra Willis added this to LandscapeAug 26, 2017

spring meadow - wind in grasses creates sound and changing sight, sensation on skin. Puffy clouds, blue sky, warm sun. Biophillic design - sensation, changing environment, stimulation in a gentle way

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