Mosaïcultures Internationales 2013Contemporary Landscape, Montreal

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vanessa_brunner
Vanessa Brunner added this to Living Sculptures Delight at the Montreal Botanical GardenJul 10, 2013

The BridgeTrois-Rivières, QuebecWant to make your own mosaiculture? The scale and maintenance needs of mosaicultures like these aren't usually suitable for residences. Installations like this require need strong plants, a consistent way to water them and a sturdy base structure. But techniques from living walls can be applied to mosaiculture-style designs for a similar look at home. Bill Thompson, garden designer and living wall expert, suggests starting with a high-quality potting soil, a strong planting module and a drip-through irrigation method. Thompson's living wall art tips: Cactus potting mix works for nearly every application. Its sandy texture compacts nicely and drains well. Succulents work well due to their compact growing habits, shade and sun adaptability, and variety of colors and textures. Small ferns, ivies and other plants with compact foliage are well suited for shady setups.Select plants in 2- to 4-inch pots. Once planted, they'll spread and fill in your design.Get a little crazy with your design. "Have fun with it," says Thompson. "It's like painting with plants." If you've chosen your plants properly and have the right irrigation, a living wall won't require much maintenance (unlike an actual mosaiculture, which requires constant pruning and watering). Choose plants that will get enough light or shade where you will put them, and prune periodically to keep your design tidy. You can even remove and replace the plants if they get too big.More: Find vertical garden structures in the Products section.

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jamolitor
jamolitor added this to landscape/outdoorsAug 10, 2013

The Bridge Trois-Rivières, Quebec Want to make your own mosaiculture? The scale and maintenance needs of mosaicultures like these aren't usually suitable for residences. Installations like this require need strong plants, a consistent way to water them and a sturdy base structure. But techniques from living walls can be applied to mosaiculture-style designs for a similar look at home. Bill Thompson, garden designer and living wall expert, suggests starting with a high-quality potting soil, a strong planting module and a drip-through irrigation method. Thompson's living wall art tips: •Cactus potting mix works for nearly every application. Its sandy texture compacts nicely and drains well. •Succulents work well due to their compact growing habits, shade and sun adaptability, and variety of colors and textures. Small ferns, ivies and other plants with compact foliage are well suited for shady setups. •Select plants in 2- to 4-inch pots. Once planted, they'll spread and fill in your design. •Get a little crazy with your design. "Have fun with it," says Thompson. "It's like painting with plants." •If you've chosen your plants properly and have the right irrigation, a living wall won't require much maintenance (unlike an actual mosaiculture, which requires constant pruning and watering). Choose plants that will get enough light or shade where you will put them, and prune periodically to keep your design tidy. You can even remove and replace the plants if they get too big.

auburnlandscape
auburnlandscape added this to Ideas for Garden Landscaper 2013Aug 3, 2013

Garden How-To: 2013 The Bridge Trois-Rivières, Quebec Want to make your own mosaiculture? The scale and maintenance needs of mosaicultures like these aren't usually suitable for residences. Installations like this require need strong plants, a consistent way to water them and a sturdy base structure. But techniques from living walls can be applied to mosaiculture-style designs for a similar look at home. Bill Thompson, garden designer and living wall expert, suggests starting with a high-quality potting soil, a strong planting module and a drip-through irrigation method. Thompson's living wall art tips: Cactus potting mix works for nearly every application. Its sandy texture compacts nicely and drains well. Succulents work well due to their compact growing habits, shade and sun adaptability, and variety of colors and textures. Small ferns, ivies and other plants with compact foliage are well suited for shady setups. Select plants in 2- to 4-inch pots. Once planted, they'll spread and fill in your design. Get a little crazy with your design. "Have fun with it," says Thompson. "It's like painting with plants." If you've chosen your plants properly and have the right irrigation, a living wall won't require much maintenance (unlike an actual mosaiculture, which requires constant pruning and watering). Choose plants that will get enough light or shade where you will put them, and prune periodically to keep your design tidy. You can even remove and replace the plants if they get too big. More: Find vertical garden structures in the Products section.

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