Shop Products
Houzz Logo Print

Comments (56)

  • 3 months ago

    Our Walmart downsized here. No more bolts. Just precut 1-2 yards of specific fabrics. All thin cotton stuffs or tulle.


    :(

  • 3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    I found a cute denim maxi skirt...for $20! (JCP) I can't buy a pattern, fabric, thread, a zipper and snap to make it for $20. And...ALL THAT work when it's got the faded front and looks amazing. I see why the average ....off-the-rack female doesn't sew any more.




  • 3 months ago

    I haven't gotten finished mourning the Christmas Tree Shop yet!

  • 3 months ago

    This does not surprise me. Their stores have become sooo junky and not maintained.

  • 3 months ago

    They have not had any fabric I wanted to buy in YEARS!

  • 3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    What kind of craft supplies do you buy? There are lots of art supply shops in Los Angeles, as well as fabric shops and specialty yarn/knitting shops.

    My favorite fabric shop, F&S in West L.A. downsized during the pandemic, and now they only sell upholstery fabrics 😞. They had the best selection of linen and silks for apparel, and now I'll have to go downtown to the fashion district to buy those - not a nice part of town.

  • 3 months ago

    I go there to buy basic yarns for my project linus blankets, needles and hooks and such, I've bought some fabric in the past, but little lately. I do go there for notions, threads, buttons, ribbons, etc. and other craft supplies like beads and glues and glue sticks, stitch witchery, interfacing material, poster board, markers, etc. I used to be able to get artificial flowers there, but their selection has been awful for years now.

  • 3 months ago

    I also won’t shop at Hobby Lobby. JoAnns is the only other option nearby. Hope they make it.

  • 3 months ago

    I’m also not surprised. It’s been pretty deserted the last few times I’ve been there.

  • 3 months ago

    they may end up closing a handful of stores ... but it is reorg. after 8 decades many of the bigger stores could be safe[r].

  • 3 months ago

    I live in the Houston area. Even here, it is hard to find good craft stores. We have Hobby Lobby, Joannes, Harwin Drive, Arnes and a handful of places like floral supply where you need a tax id or a business to buy things. I sometimes buy table clothes on clearance or shop at Goodwill for old linens so I can make crafts.

  • 3 months ago

    I remember shopping at The Yarn Barn when we lived in CA.

  • 3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    I also will not shop at Hobby Lobby (“Hobby Robby”) for at least two good reasons.

    ETA cannot post link, but you can search name of store and ancient antiquities.

  • 3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    I will admit...our JoAnns store is packed! They have at least 3 registers open at ALL times. The cutting table has a HUGE line of people waiting. They have a HUGE selection of fake florals or ready made wreaths....but....they have a LOT of competition here.

  • 3 months ago







    From a PBS link that i cannot post. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  • 3 months ago

    There are two types of bankruptcy relevant for most businesses:

    Chapter 11 bankruptcy - a filing for "reorganization". Pre-filing debts are frozen pending resolution, post-filing debts have priority, and there's an unstated assumption that the business plans to continue operating in some form with relief from a percentage reduction of liabilities that existed at the time of filing.

    Chapter 7 bankruptcy - a filing to cease operations, use any assets to satisfy creditors (though the expenses of the process have priority and are paid in full) and dissolve the business entity.

    This retailer apparently did a Chapter 11 filing and intends to continue operating.

  • 3 months ago

    We really have no place to buy fabric locally any more when there used to be several options. JC Penney's had a fabric dept, along with thread, notions, zippers etc! Joann an hour away is probably the only place I've purchased any in long time. I have a couple of windows I would like to add sheer curtains to. I can make sheer curtains, but I need a store...

    I used to love Calico Corners in Seattle and could find whatever I wanted there. They would often have a sale section where I would find things otherwise too expensive for me to have purchased....silks, expensive braided trims. I have some now I bought just because they were beautiful and marked down, have yet to use them ...................................................😊

    Many places I enjoyed in Portland Oregon that may still be there - I so rarely have had a chance to shop when there, busy with family things. There was a Mill End store that took an entire day just to see the offerings which ran from upholstery, silks, wool, if you could dream it, it was there - and discounted. I should go sometime and spend the night, not tell anyone I'm even in town. There was a lampshade shop I could get lost in too and I haven't had a chance to even see if still in business...(I have something of a weakness for lamps with beautiful shades, gave some I'd had for a while to a niece several months ago and want to shop)

    Hopefully Joann can make a restructuring work, or someone competent with some imagination could arrive to fill the gap.

  • 3 months ago

    Insofar as Joann's fabric and yarn offerings go, can there be much of a business opportunity going forward selling supplies for activities that seem to be declining rather than growing in popularity?

  • 3 months ago

    I disagree that crafting activities are declining in popularity. Indeed, hand crafted items are more in demand than ever. And I know lots of people much younger than myself who enjoy crocheting, sewing, quilting, etc. My coworker makes a very good side income by selling custom embroidered items, as well as printing t-shirts and other things and my sister makes several hundred dollars on every quilt she makes, and also does custom embroidery. She is making me a king size quilt of all different patterns of pink and I cannot wait. I do very well with my hand poured candles, wax cubes and soap. I love that giant yarn to crochet big, squishy blankets to give as gifts and people love them. Lots of "old fashioned" activities are becoming more popular among younger people. Gardening and canning for example. These are things that really are not necessary anymore, but people enjoy them. Same with crafting. Though I do not think that crafting ever experienced a lull in popularity.


    I have never been to JoAnns even though there is one close enough. I tend to go to other craft stores when I do go. Even so, I hope that they can stay open for the ones that do go and enjoy shopping there.

  • 3 months ago

    " activities that seem to be declining rather than growing in popularity? " Why do you think this Elmer? I would say more and more people are into DIY--I think crafty Arts and crafts shows popularity is in decline but that's because more and more people are giving these things a try themselves. If COVID showed us one thing it was that having hobbies you can do at home is a positive to your life. I did some looking and JoAnn's competition is Michael's and Hobby Lobby. I've thought Michael's stores seem a little worn lately. I guess Hobby Lobby is top dog for craft stores. They do it right and they do it well is the take away from the economics.

  • 3 months ago

    Hi arcy,

    Maybe it's just what I see among my own family and friends. For each succeeding new step of the generations I've known, from my grandparents through to my own now-adult kids and the peers of each along the way, it seems that activities like sewing, knitting/crocheting, and just handcrafts in general have become less common with new "group". These are not things any of my kids or their partners do. One of our friends knits - I recall that for my mother and among her friends, most of them did.

    It sounds like your experiences are different.

    PS - I don't think Hobby Lobby sells anything I'd ever need or use but I'd gladly inconvenience myself to go to another store to buy something as an alternative source. I'd never give them a penny.

  • 3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    Lars, you're fortunate to be in an area with apparel and other manufacturing that uses textiles, I think - along with lots of artists. There's enough demand to support more of those businesses.

    We lost our local arts & crafts supply stores years ago, and there's one independent fabric store left in town - fortunately nearby and extensive.

    We've Michael's and Joann Fabrics about a mile or so apart on the same main road, just a few minutes from work, and a number of Walmarts and Targets in our area too.

    I've noticed a lot of folks order their art & craft supplies on Amazon nowadays. We do for work. There's an incredible amount of stuff available on that site. It requires vigilance, tho - I've received some duds.

    I've done a fair amount of online ordering from Joann too, it saves on shipping costs to ship to store for pickup. They do have good prices on craft supplies I use regularly.

  • 3 months ago

    I will shop at Michael's for canvas Hobby Lobby for paint. But neither has had good sales lately.

  • 2 months ago

    So funny, in today's mail there was an flyer from Joann's along with coupons. Must have been sent before the Chapter 11 filing.

  • 2 months ago

    " Must have been sent before the Chapter 11 filing. "

    Why do you say that?

  • 2 months ago

    Because mail doesn't go through the corporate mailroom or mail service, the regional post office, the local post office, the mail truck and my mailbox all that quickly. It's been only three or four days since the announcement of Chapter 11. If I were a mean person, I'd add "Duh", but I am not.

  • 2 months ago

    I still don't understand what you're saying. The company is still in business, stores are still open, they want to entice customers to buy just as always. Unchanged. I'll say "Duh" to you.

  • 2 months ago

    Not going to answer you. I refuse to get in that trap. I've seen what goes on.

  • 2 months ago

    My ”local” Joann's which is about 13 miles away has been very well stocked in recent years. Michael's which is much closer doesn't carry the same sort of supplies as Joanns, and while I also have a Hobby Lobby close by, I won't set foot nor spend any of my money in that store.

  • 2 months ago

    " Not going to answer you. "

    That's fine. Your comment makes no sense to me, I think you may be confused.

    Or maybe I'm dense? Can someone help me understand what this person was trying to say?

  • 2 months ago

    I have a Joanns local- they just moved buildings with a remodel, it's pretty nice. Across the way is a Michaels. Between them they supply a lot of my crafting needs. Both places are usually pretty hopping with customers when I go into them. I'm eternally grateful that we have an excellent bead shop in town- those have disappeared a lot over the last decade or so as store owners have been aging out and closing shop. The bead shop gets goodly customers too- from old folks to kids. A side shoot of miniatures that some folks are getting onto is the miniverse and creation balls- those are sold at regular stores. Kids like them and some adults really collect them. The creation balls utilize UV resin for builds, and UV resin has become a lot more popular over the last few years.

    I tend not to order online because I like to handle my crafting goods in person before buying. But I think online buying has impacted all the brick and mortar stores. Amazon for sure, and also the newer wave of slow boat sites like Temu.

  • 2 months ago

    Faftris, they have filed Chapter 11, not 13, and the Joann stores will continue operating as usual. Unless they are unsuccessful in their reorganization, their operations will continue as they always have and you will continue to receive those flyers in the mail.

  • 2 months ago

    Chapter 11 is for reorganization, and I believe it allows for asset sales and store closures when specific stores are judged as non-performing.

  • 2 months ago

    jakkom, it's a bit more basic than that.

    The Chapter 11 filing freezes debts existing on the date of filing. A bankruptcy court proceeding begins and can last for several years. People overseeing the operation of the business (called "debtor in possession", but normally the existing management) continue to operate the business in a normal way. A plan needs to be presented for business moving forward and how prefiling creditors will be paid. Normally, such debts are settled by the proceeding with a substantial haircut to what was owed. The court jurisdiction exists to protect the interest of creditors.

    Major transactions need court approval but as to what is done and not done, that's determined by the debtor in possession in consultation with advisors and in consultation with the Creditor's Committee.

    I'll mention that the filing clears away some problems that existed prefiling, like a lack of funds due to tight credit and illiquidity. Post-filing creditors (and fees to advisors) have a priority claim on assets and so their positions are as secure as could be. It's not unusual for a troubled business to negotiate in advance bank lines of credit to be effective the day after filing. Cash floods in at that time to continue operations.

  • 2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Another upstanding citizen/business ...

    ... that's close to drowning in the Amazon?

    ole (usually) joyful

  • 2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    No big deal, We have hobby Lobby! Today I went to buy some Goya beans, it's the only brand I'll buy, and stopped at Chick-fil-A for a sandwich which is always clean, well staffed and with happy polite people. I next stopped at hobby lobby just for the friendly atmosphere and look around.

    You people act like you've lost your best friend but Joann isn't and never was a person. It's was bought and owned by a Private equity firm as a dying cow to sell the flesh before it dies as private equity funds often do. Then in 2021 the equity firm did a IPO on the stock market for Joann's with a staggering $1.2 billion in long term debt. They sucked in institutional investors to buy up 1/3 of the shares and kept the rest to collect dividends the board authorized every quarter for two years. Yep, a billion in debt but still paid dividends.

    I enjoy reading SEC filings from these falling knife companies and how they spin the mismanagement and corruption. One example from Joann's Oct. 2023 10Q is how increases in general expenses where do to severance, so it looks like someone was jumping with a golden parachute.

    Joann's won't be buried yet, There is a $billion in fixed assets to be sold and suspect new separate LLC's will be formed by certain people connected to the equity firm ready to bid pennies on the dollar for some of these fixed assets, which will be approved by the board, (wink wink) and then allowed by the bankruptcy judge. So forgo the pity and just shop at Hobby Lobby which is still growing store numbering over 1000.

    I understand your polarizing "other reasons" but consider it irrational thought reform. I don't agree with target corp. but won't pass up 99 cent spiral ham regardless of what people try and make me believe. (and the ham is delicious). Disney? What ever someone wants to say I won't miss a good Disney movie either and watch a great one (Cruella) last night and highly recommend it with 5 stars *****. And don't get me going about Budweiser but won't stop buying Corona even if Mr. T begged me. Some here need to review they're own level of thought reform and decide if you are capable of individual thought or part of a hive mind. This quiz will help you decide how far off the deep end you've went.

  • 2 months ago

    Good for you, kevin. I will never, ever shop at hobby lobby. Or, buy Goya beans.

  • 2 months ago

    I've found over the 20+ years hanging out at Garden Web/Houzz it's a waste of energy to do more than state one's opinion and move on. But when I see a post surviving long past a reasonable amount of posts I have been known to swing by and see how it devolved. It's hilarious that Houzz is ADAMANT posters are to never be controversial/political/religious, and yet posters just can't NOT be. JoAnns will be missed by many. That was a fair sharing. Sadly it was hijacked by haters. Craft supplies are craft supplies. Standing on a soap box ALONE (in the end this group is not affecting the economy AT ALL) is just exhausting for us to read. Hobby Lobby is strong, well and beating the heck out of JoAnn's--that's the bottom line. I have a very naïve, kool- aid drinking offspring. The family was in search of some craft supply. I suggested Hobby Lobby would have it. "NO ONE shops there, is it even still open?", she declared. As I do I just looked at her and shook my head. Not only did it have the item we could find no where else the sales that day were INSANE and said offspring filled two carts full of the cutest things!!! haahahahahahahah I am more than fine many of you WILL NEVER shop at______________. That keeps the isles free for the rest of us!!!

  • 2 months ago

    Projecting much?

    🙄

  • 2 months ago

    My closest Joann's is 45 minutes north of me and it is closing. The next closest is 2 hours south of me! What is a sewist to do?

    Kathy G in MI

  • 2 months ago

    Most of these comments are about Craft items. Some of us buy Fabric. That is an item that should be seen in person for exact colour and also feel.

  • 2 months ago

    For me fabric is part of crafting. Sewing is one of a few crafts that need fabric for me. It's a lot like other crafting items for me too. Some things can be ordered online. But a lot of things that are produced in lots or runs I tend to want to handle in person.

    I was talking to someone recently about the word crafting. They work principally with beading. When I called beading part of crafting, they frowned on that. Crafting is junky, cheesy, gluing glitterballs to stuff... It's not the creation of beading. I find that interesting because it's the same notion that some sewers have- that sewing isn't crafting, crafting is something else. We as a social thing have attached something derogatory to the term crafting, or have elevated whatever our craft is to something other than or better than just crafting. But all of it is crafting. We start as apprentices, sometimes become journeymen... some of us become master craftsmen of whatever it is. The things we create can be of poor craftsmanship to sublime craftsmanship.

  • 2 months ago

    I buy the fabric I use to make my "Click Bags" that I give away! Joanns is where I find the fabrics I can afford. Hope they don't close all the stores. I can't afford to give away bags if I pay high prices for the fabrics. Prepackage fabrics don't work for me. When I buy fabric for 8 bags in the same color I need 2 coordinating fabric 37" each. I tried with the precut 1 yd cuts and I need that extra inch!

    BTW, years ago I worked for Joanns for 10 years. Loved it!

  • 2 months ago

    How sad that many refer to the store as a "craft" store. I dont want another darned craft store that sells insignificant craft stuff. I want a real fabric store!!!! There is not one darned thing in Michaels that I consider to be worthy of dealing with or owning..plastic flowers, seasonal nonsense, glue and gitter and cheap yarn...is what all that is. Most of it is pure junk, in my opinion. J's is the only thing left for most of the nation, as lame as it is. I dont hold out for a better fabric selection at J's . They will probably center more around that cheap craft market. There may be more profit in that cheap stuff than there is in being a seller of quality fabrics and supporting sewing needs.

    A single piece of candy sold as an impulse buy at the checkout may have a higher percentage return of profit than a serious item. I know taht was the case when I worked at Borders as it applies to book sales. The profit margin on the candy was higher.


    The same is likely to be true of many of the cheap craft items at J's. Clever marketing gurus factor in some many little details in order to create a profit from the jumble of merchandise. it can be surprising to see just how some retail entities make a profit and where that profit comes from might be surprising. It may not be what appears to be the main product being sold where they actualy make their profit.


    Another example woud be extended warranties. I used to sell sewing machines at Sears, too. And Sears made more profit from selling the extended warranty than they did selling the machine.

    All is not as it might appear to be when it comes to business.

    That explains those impulse items at most cash registers at most store. Never was there candy at the fabric store back when the world was normal . Some even have soda machines!!! Horrors!! Maybe there was just this little thing or that little thing as a impulse buy , but not the likes of candy and novelty kids socks and silly things to hang on the wall.

  • 2 months ago

    bees, there is a confusing and not well defined defintion as to what is craft and what is beyound that. If we refer to the work of a talented needle artist and the kid with the fusible bead kit as both being a "craft" that is very confusing.

    I think that we have taken the word "craft" and applied it much too liberally and way too generously to too many things! So much so that we have sullied the meaning of the word.


    I dont consider my sewing to be a craft, Neither is it an "art", necessarily. I consider it to be a skill that required a learning, materials, techniques, sophisticated tools and experinece that produces useful and durable items of quality and value and, even, art.

    Much of the craft stuff at Michaels and J's requires very little skill of any kind and anyone can do it.......fast, simple and easy is what they advertise it as on the packaging. My sewing skills were not acquired quickly, simply or easily. I earned and learned them and refuse to see myself the same as one who threads cheap yarn through plastic "canvas" to make an image of a sunflower or a cat, or uses a sewing machine to make little hearts and bookmarks from felt.

    Any set of tools or materials can be use to create art. Art is another vaguely defined and overly applied definition. Sure that a talented artist could extract art from one of those kits where you glue glittery dots to a chart to make a unicorn.

    I invested too much of my life in learning a skill and it would feel to be devaluing of myself to put myself into the same catagory as to fit the modern usage of a crafter. Also, I am not an artist no matter how many fancy tricks I can do with my sewing machine. But my skills are learned and I have invested in them.

    I do understand the point you are making, though. There is dimension to the meaning of the word, but we have reduced it to a flat desigination for too many unworthhy things and have devalued it.

  • 2 months ago

    Pretty sure you didn't understand my point claudia. But if you can't be artistic with manipulation of fabric no matter what you do, it may help me understand your point of view better.

    I feel I am a crafter, of many things. Including fabrics. I feel sewing itself has some different crafts in it. Like one can straight use a modern pattern, apprentices. It's another level to use unprinted vintage patterns. Different skills to adapt patterns. Journeymen. And another level to eye someone up and draft a pattern to fit. Master of the craft. I feel it takes an artistic hand and eye to choose a fabric and craft a lovely cascade or drape with it. An apprentice will choose a fabric with a poor hand, or won't drape right and they aren't sure why. Needs to follow the fabric suggestions on the pattern. A journeyman will be good with the hand and drape, understanding why. Might not need the pattern suggestions, know how to use other fabrics as well. A master can make even things that shouldn't do that work well and things that should do that be effortless looking. And do it without having to stop to look it up or think about why because they already know. And tailoring- there is for sure leveling up in how an apprentice tacks something up and how a master makes things fit. Hand stitching is it's own craft, one that has gotten less popular over time. Though some of the craftier/more artistic forms of it are seeing some resurgence with some upcycling trends and costume/garb creation.

    I probably feel this way because I was raised with the apprentice, journeyman, master craftsman mindset. Most of the people around me have been crafters of things. At lot of different things ranging from smaller home skills to larger full time life long careers. We all start out apprentices, and gain or not from there. I don't mind being with the folks that make hearts, canvas sunflowers, and dotty unicorns. It's not crafts I'm into creating, but I feel they are just as valid as what I do like to craft. I know some of what I craft isn't what other people are into. The kid playing with the fusable bead kit today could become a master jewel setter of Cartier in the future. It starts somewhere. The master embroiderer of yesterday can become unable to stitch fine, and still find creative satisfaction in gluing dots or stitching fleece blankets. Or just decide to give up the fine stitching for something more fun or relaxing for them.

    So I do appreciate Joanns. If for sewing only, they are the closest craft store to me that carries a goodly stock of sewing notions. And some useful fabrics :) For me, they also carry some materials for other things I craft that are not sewing related.


  • 2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Very well said Claudia and couldn't agree more. There two definitions for crafts, one is "skill in making things by hand" and the other is "skill used in deceiving others". What people consider crafts now would intermingle the two definitions as "the deception of skill used in handmade items." Sewing is a skill and see no difference between it and many other trades which requires skill. Give a Carpenter a needle and a seamstress a hammer and lets see who can make something first, my bet is on the seamstress.
    There should be a outlet to acquire materials and tools for the novice up to a professional seamstresses, but unless Joann's is removed from the hands of a private equity firm and into the hands of a owner who understands the difference it's future will be a challenge. Joann's mission from there website states "To inspire the creative spirit in each of us — our customers and ourselves." Ok then, and if that's the mission of the equity firm owning Joann's it doesn't inspire or impress me as a mission.

    With just a few more billion I'd buy Joann's and reinvent it as a fabric and sewing specialty store and also a wedding wear creator. Gowns by Kevin, it has a nice ring. I'd get rid of all the junk, and devote a percentage of the store to wedding wear and hire designers and seamstresses to create masterpieces by district. Seamstresses would be allowed to spend 10% of their time on their own creations to see what we get (got that from 3M companies) and also specialize in traditional gowns based on ethnicity. I can see it now, fashion shows by Joann's featuring gowns by Kevin.

    Oh, with 30 million people participating in home sewing and the Wedding wear estimated to hit $80 billion by 2030 why the heck not. It beats glitter, glue and fill between the line color books.


  • 2 months ago

    A major competitor to JoAnns, Michael’s (Arts and Crafts), has recently started an alternative to Etsy. MakerPlace - a place for artists and crafters to sell their creations.


    https://www.michaels.com/makerplace



  • 2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Goodness - I teach arts & crafts and have a degree in Fine Art. I also sew, and the only difference between art and craft I know is crafts are things made for use, while arts are for appreciation and entertainment - that's about it. Sewing is most decidedly a craft.

    I think the 'junk' being disdained here is mainly 'kits'. Both Michael's and Joann sell basic supplies too, not just kits.

    There is a ton of merchandising of craft stuff, for sure - thinking of scrapbooking, for instance, but I find a lot of the materials sold for scrapbooking to be useful for other crafts - paper punches, stamps, paper - types of adhesives too. I'm glad they have such things.

    And how would you define the words 'craftsman', 'craftsmanship'? The word 'craft' encompasses a really broad spectrum of things, so I think it's a mistake to define it so narrowly.

  • 2 months ago

    The modern application of the terms is what is tripping us all up.

    I can produce "art" from fabric manipulation, if I wanted to. That is not on my agenda. I care not.

    But I have spent a lifetime sewing and learning and producing. Not just anyone can do it without having served a kind of an apparenticship of sorts.

    I see a lot of sewing that is basically what I call a craft project. I have done a few of those, too along the way.

    These craft supply retailers are a far cry from the older "hobby shops" of yesteryear. sure a few of you here will remember those days.