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stargazer51

We have a cat who was a great gopher/mouse hunter. Gophers decimated my vegetable garden several times and killed an established wisteria so I hate them. We've since installed galvanized steel troughs for planters. About 6 months ago, we started giving the cat treats when he came in at 5:00pm to encourage him to come inside instead of staying out all night because of coyotes. He quit hunting. I guess treats are easier than staking out gopher holes.

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A L

I live in metro Detroit and we have deer, ground hogs, rabbits and squirrels that all help themselves whenever possible. I have wire cages around most plants, especially newly planted young ones. I am hopeful that, as the one reader suggested, the plants will grow and/or multiply enough that some will survive while others are eaten. I do find that most of my native plants are left in tact. Most animals do not like milkweed and wondering if it was actually the monarch caterpillar that ate the milkweed? I’ve never had gophers but I feed the birds and have had problems with rodents, ugh! One method I tried was to shove holes full of pruned rose bushes. The thorns often caused them to move elsewhere but that doesn’t really solve the problem.

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kl23

I support the concept of sustainable landscaping. I want others to know sustainable landscaping does not have to look like a prairie. Formal design also can be made more sustainable. Permeable self-healing carbon absorbing concrete exists as a more sustainable material than traditional concrete. Creating flower beds that leaves can be blown into instead of taking and removing is sustainable. Packing those flower beds with vigorous self-seeking cultivars of natives instead of mulching with chopped wood is sustainable. Trees that break the rainfall and reduce erosion is sustainable. Shrubs are great for birds. All those can be arranged in a formal design. Nothing wrong with the prairie look, but not everyone likes it and I want them to know they can make sustainable choices too, without sacrificing their style preferences.

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