0
Your shopping cart is empty.

Hermann Loft RenovationIndustrial Bathroom, Houston

Urban bathroom photo in Houston with concrete countertops and white walls —  Houzz
Related Photo Topics
Related Professionals in Houston
This photo has 11 questions
susananndunn wrote:Mar 27, 2014
  • PRO
    CONTENT Architecture
    We recommend using a professional to construct the countertop. A properly sealed concrete countertop is easy to maintain.
  • somnorri
    How do you properly seal concrete/limestone tops? Thanks
doodie25 wrote:Jan 24, 2016
jennmmcc wrote:Jan 16, 2015
  • PRO
    CONTENT Architecture

    There is a steel frame anchored back to the wall that supports the concrete

vfaye wrote:Jul 16, 2014
  • audveld
    what kind of sink is this?
sarajke wrote:Jul 15, 2014
Lindsay wrote:Jul 15, 2014
Mega-Inmobiliaria wrote:Jul 6, 2015
    metwright wrote:Jul 18, 2014

      What Houzz contributors are saying:

      lisaskahn
      Lisa Kahn added this to Bathroom Countertops 101: The Top Surface MaterialsDec 5, 2014

      ConcreteNo longer exclusively an industrial material, concrete has miraculous shape-shifting abilities that allow an endless array of looks. Most concrete countertops are manufactured offsite for maximum quality control.Pros:It’s an appealing organic material that can mimic the look of natural stone.Vast range of customized colors, textures and decorative inlays.Can be cast in the exact shape, dimensions and edge style desired.Extremely durable.Reasonably ecofriendly, especially when recycled content is added.Cons:Professional design and installation are recommended.Because concrete is naturally porous, countertops need to be waxed and sealed regularly.Visible seam lines, although their appearance can be minimized with a colored filler.Price range: $65 to $135 per square foot, not including installation

      mitchell_parker
      Mitchell Parker added this to Bathroom Workbook: 10 Elements of Industrial StyleJun 30, 2014

      Raw materials in general. Simply put, industrial style takes cues from buildings of industry. Think more along the lines of old manufacturing — factories, warehouses etc. — rather than corporate offices. These buildings weren’t built with aesthetics in mind, but rather efficiency and budget. Basic materials like concrete, brick, steel and wood form the bulk of them, and they weren’t done to perfection. “Masonry materials, sloppy mortar work, and quick and dirty bricks that are all uneven — it wasn’t deliberate. They were just going fast and being cheap,” says Jesse Hager, an architect at Content Architecture who designed the bathroom shown here, which is in a Houston building built in 1917 and converted to lofts in 1997.

      What Houzzers are commenting on:

      chefannie
      chefannie added this to chefannie's ideasApr 20, 2019

      minimal look and below sink storage

      margarita_marshall
      Margaret Marshall added this to Margaret's ideasApr 20, 2019

      I know karl likes concrete so just foot noting to consider for downstairs

      Similar Ideas
      Hermann Loft Renovation
      Hermann Loft Renovation
      Hermann Loft Renovation
      Modern Texas Prefab
      Hermann Loft Renovation
      Stone Forest and Pelham
      Paradise Concrete Design Studio
      Hermann Loft Renovation
      Bathrooms with Similar Colors
      Artisan Lakeside Showhouse
      Serenity Master Bath
      Baldivis home by Red Ink
      Toscane
      Venice Beach Man Pad
      London NW1
      A House at Hod-Hasharon
      2014 Spring Parade of Homes Winner

      Need help with an existing Houzz order? Call 1-800-368-4268 (Mon-Sun).