Porter Street BungalowCraftsman Exterior, DC Metro

The Cleveland Park neighborhood of Washington, D.C boasts some of the most beautiful and well maintained bungalows of the late 19th century. Residential streets are distinguished by the most significant craftsman icon, the front porch.
Porter Street Bungalow was different. The stucco walls on the right and left side elevations were the first indication of an original bungalow form. Yet the swooping roof, so characteristic of the period, was terminated at the front by a first floor enclosure that had almost no penetrations and presented an unwelcoming face. Original timber beams buried within the enclosed mass provided the
only fenestration where they nudged through. The house,
known affectionately as ‘the bunker’, was in serious need of
a significant renovation and restoration.
A young couple purchased the house over 10 years ago as
a first home. As their family grew and professional lives
matured the inadequacies of the small rooms and out of date systems had to be addressed. The program called to significantly enlarge the house with a major new rear addition. The completed house had to fulfill all of the requirements of a modern house: a reconfigured larger living room, new shared kitchen and breakfast room and large family room on the first floor and three modified bedrooms and master suite on the second floor.

Front photo by Hoachlander Davis Photography.
All other photos by Prakash Patel.

Example of an arts and crafts two-story gable roof design in DC Metro —  Houzz
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This photo has 13 questions
roseherdman wrote:Sep 16, 2012
  • Katie Guice
    Love the windows. What color Kolbe window? Thank you!
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    These are wood windows from Kolbe that were painted with Sherwin-Williams Polished Mahogany (SW 2838).
Rosemarie Veliz wrote:Aug 31, 2016
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC

    These doors are stained wood, but I'm not sure on the exact stain color as it was most likely decided in the field. Sorry for the lack of info, but thank you for your interest in our work.

  • Rosemarie Veliz

    Your work is beautiful...very inspiring. Thank you for answering my question.

glenncraftsman wrote:May 16, 2015
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC

    This finish was achieved by a local stucco craftsman, matching the existing condition. Because it was done in a way to match the existing home, we didn't specify an exact technique. However, I can tell you that the finish is quite smooth. Good luck with your home!

  • PRO
    Raji RM

    Gorgeous home and perfect exterior colors!


roseherdman wrote:Oct 26, 2012
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    These are the colors from Sherwin Williams...

    All trim, including eaves: Downing Sand SW 2822 (finish-semigloss)
    Cedar Shingles: Downing Earth SW 2820 (finish-flat)
    Stucco: Downing Earth SW 2820 (finish-semigloss)
    Windows: Polished Mahogany SW 2838 (finish-semigloss)
  • jennybrandt
    Love it!
jennyclerkcsr wrote:May 13, 2016
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC

    All trim, including eaves: Downing Sand SW 2822 (finish-semigloss)
    Cedar Shingles: Downing Earth SW 2820 (finish-flat)
    Stucco: Downing Earth SW 2820 (finish-semigloss)
    Windows: Polished Mahogany SW 2838 (finish-semigloss)

jbm765 wrote:Dec 9, 2015
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC

    The first floor has ~9'-0" ceilings. Thanks for your interest in our work!

Cristi Godwin wrote:Nov 24, 2014
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    The stone walkways, porch floor and stair treads are Pennsylvania Flagstone pavers. Thank you for your interest in our work!
idbusah wrote:Aug 31, 2014
fortbob wrote:Jun 11, 2014
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    This is a Kolbe & Kolbe Craftsman front door. Thank you for your interest in our work!
Ann Gray wrote:Oct 18, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    Thank you so much. These are TAMKO 30 year black asphalt shingles. Good luck with your home!
andybmoore wrote:Mar 21, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    Those are the correct colors for this home. It might just be a matter of the photograph making the color look lighter and more gray. If you like the colors here, I would suggest putting up a sample on the side of your home to see what you think. Thanks for your interest!
cslowrance wrote:Jan 19, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    We can't share the floor plans, but thank you for your interest!
dawnbrantley wrote:Dec 9, 2012
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    This was a renovation! A photo of the home before the renovation has now been added to the project's photo collection. Check it out!

What Houzz contributors are saying:

lolalina
Laura Gaskill added this to Nail Your Curb Appeal: Craftsman StyleJun 23, 2016

Go more modern (with caution). If you’re not a huge fan of the earth tone look, you can go with a more modern gray or “greige,” as shown here. Just keep it a little bit muddy to pay homage to your home’s Craftsman roots, and choose an off-white rather than pure white for trim.Shingle and stucco color: Downing Earth, Sherwin-Williams; trim color: Downing Sand 2822, Sherwin-Williams

sarahphipps
Sarah Phipps Design added this to Clues to Your Home's Architectural HistoryNov 5, 2013

The Craftsman became the most popular home style between 1905 and into the 1920s in the U.S., due to the expansion of magazines and the availability of kit homes. Many of these homes had a low-pitched gable roof, a front porch supported by large, tapered columns, an upper-paned door with the windows separated from the lower half of the door by a thick piece of trim, double-hung windows, a single dormer on the front of the house, stone accents and earthy paint colors. Most also had exposed rafter tails and roof beams and knee braces under a deep roof eave.

stevenrandel
Steven Corley Randel, Architect added this to Roots of Style: The Birth of Modern ArchitectureJul 2, 2013

This remodeled and updated house has tapered wood columns set on stucco pedestals. In contrast to the previous house, the roof formation is a side gable, rather than front facing. A shed dormer penetrates the main roof form. This is a common Craftsman characteristic. Also notice the mixture of stucco and shingle siding.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

sandra_brown61
Sandra Brown added this to WINDOWS Exterior6 days ago

note mullions on square triples on porch

maple_leafs_67
Jamie B added this to Exterior ColoursAug 25, 2019

I like this but maybe it’s too light?

webuser_707207335
Tim Schwanke added this to Exterior PaintAug 13, 2019

Downing Sand SW 2822 (finish-semigloss) Cedar Shingles: Downing Earth SW 2820 (finish-flat) Stucco: Downing Earth SW 2820 (finish-semigloss) Windows: Polished Mahogany SW 2838 (finish-semigloss) 1 Like Save May 13, 2016 at 2:11PM

tobia_imbier
Tobia Imbier added this to Exterior PaintAug 3, 2019

SW downing stone +downing sand.

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