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Thoughts on killing Cuban Tree Frogs?

sunshinestate
16 years ago

What are your thoughts on the killing of invasive Cuban Tree Frogs? Because of the destructive effects on Florida's native species, the University of Florida and Extension Services recommend that Cuban Treefrogs be captured and humanely euthanized. See link with details -

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/UW259

Comments (143)

  • jollyjp
    15 years ago

    Sunday I found one I've been hunting for awhile. I was on the back porch looking at the sunset, & he made the fatal mistake of croaking. It was climbing on a house plant, so I took plant & frog out in the yard & hollered for DH. He got a 410 shotgun, & no more CTF. It was quick & humane. Frog didn't know what hit him. Now my lizards can safely come back to the porch, until the next CTF decides to invade their little kindom.

  • manature
    15 years ago

    WOW...you are SERIOUS about this issue, jollyjp! A shotgun, huh? That's a new one on me. Myself, I just go all Soprano and WHACK 'em!

    But whatever works, I guess.

    Marcia

  • jollyjp
    15 years ago

    Yeah, Marcia, I'm serious alright.
    I found one in a Christmas cactus a couple weeks ago, & dumped it out in the middle of the yard. When DH got home, I told him & he went out & stomped it as hard as he could, & it hopped back toward the house into the shrubs. Neither one of us could catch it -Long long legs that sucker had! So DH swore the next one would get the shotgun. LOL

  • abendwolke
    15 years ago

    so you are all just as serious about killing the cuban anole? this one is killing off our green anole, yes?

  • countrynest
    15 years ago

    Marcia and others, you give Human activities far too much credit in affecting life on our planet. It is true that in 1962, when I left Cuba, I brought over a suit case of my
    collection of frogs. You can't fault me after all I was doing
    what any eleven year old would do. I also brought two anoles
    in my pockets. The rest,like solar flares,earth quakes,shifting of the planet's poles and plates,causing
    allot of species going extinct,I'm not responsible.
    Now in reference to warming of the planet,that is just a bunch of hot air. I have been educated by Rush Limbau,
    I'm one of his disciples, I know what I'm talking about.
    Felix

  • manature
    15 years ago

    Felix, Felix, Felix! What are we gonna do with YOU!!

    Seriously, I know that we can't always undo the damage we've done...but sometimes we CAN. Look at the bald eagle. In grave peril just a few decades ago, along with the osprey, strictly because of our persistent use of DDT. Once we banned that and offered them some real protection, they rebounded, and just in the nick of time. Sometimes all is not lost, and we CAN make a difference.

    Evelyn, from what I'm reading, the Cuban Treefrog is a far bigger threat to our anoles than the brown anole. The Carolina (green) anole is apparently learning to compete with the brown, and they are beginning to come back in areas where the brown anoles were once displacing them. The same thing can't be said for areas where Cuban Treefrogs proliferate. They can't win against them.

    And not only the Carolina anoles, but our own native green treefrogs have been completely displaced by them, and are disappearing rapidly. As the CTF's work their weay northward, the green treefrogs decline drastically, finally disappearing completely in many areas. I don't know if we can reverse that in central or south Florida, or not. But if we can stop the spread of CTF's, perhaps the Carolina anoles in northern Florida will survive and spread back into this area.

    Everyone has to make up their own minds on issues like this, but I think it is worth a shot. I can't stop global warming all by myself, but I can make my backyard a CTF-Free Zone, and I can encourage others to do so.

    So I'm workin' on it.......

    Marcia

  • jollyjp
    15 years ago

    Bravo Marcia,
    I agree with you 100%.
    Around my place the brown anoles are numerous, but the greens are making a strong come-back. They are even "getting along" with each other. I posted a pic of a cross on the post "Look at This Guy!" He is a beautiful bright green with a brownish ridge down his back-had to be a cross.Don't know if that's a good idea, but "survival of the fittest" I guess, except when it comes to CTF's. They gotta go!

  • junkyardgirl
    15 years ago

    I have no native frogs, no native lizards, and no native toads left due to the invasive species. I kill the Cubans every chance I get, but there are so many now, it would be a full time job to kill them all.

    I used to have tons of toads in my yard, and now they are all gone. I found a cuban who had actually sneaked into my bird cage and was after my cockatiels once. Guess he climbed in when he was small, and stayed in until he was big, otherwise, no way he could have gotten in. Don't know how he escaped my notice for so long, but they do grow quickly.

    I don't kill the brown anoles, because they are the only defense I have against the stupid roaches! I have tons of roaches, and can't imagine how many I would have if it wasn't for the anoles. Besides, they're cute.

    I miss my toads. I had made little toady house for them out of my broken clay pots, and they never come anymore.

    I didn't have this invasion of roaches before the toads disappeared. They would eat them, but evidently, the cubans won't. I've been fighting roaches for about 3 years now, and it's a losing battle. I need toads! I'm ready to go and capture some from the wild.

    So yes, Cubans do upset the balance of things drastically.

  • ripctf
    15 years ago

    Ahhh, a CTF haters group? I read this whole thread and empathize enough with the plight, to have created an account just to show support for the cause. Recently, my small Koi pond has recieved a chorus nighttime screaming Cuban Tree Frogs. After two sleepless nights, my grumpy disposition moved me to action. Nearly a half dozen of these pests have met a quick end due to a rapid deceleration against my wall. There seems to be a kind of succession ready to replace those who have fallen, but I stand ready to do battle again. On a positive note, I did catch a greenie happily watching the onslaught from my eve. The CTF, not only ugly, invassive, a hinderance on our greenies, but they're also annoying. Good riddence. I've got a few greenies around, a toad or two, one field mouse and a growing garter snake. I like the nature, just not cubas nature.

  • buttterflyy
    15 years ago

    Two years ago I had LOTS of frogs.. assorted and kept many photos. Last year there were very few. This year....today.. a multitude of tiny babies. After reading this thread and looking again at my photos.. MOST were ctf's. I was hoping those adorable tiny things were GOOd things. Not.

    If I stick a pipe in for them to 'inhabit'... how do they get onto the top and down into it?
    Thanks

  • nativemel
    15 years ago

    Buttterflyy - Unlike Shaq they have really good aim! Nah, just kidding. The way I understand it is that they CTF's are naturally attracted to enter into small openings, so they will jump onto the pipe, use their sticky feet to make their way to the top, go down into the opening and never be able to get back out. Theoretically. Hopefully. Although it makes me wonder how it is that their sticky foot pads allow them to make their way up the outside surface of the pipe, but they are unable to work their way up the inside surface of the pipe.

  • abendwolke
    15 years ago

    about the pvc pipes, I check them on my morning coffee walks, and if i see a frog in it, I lift the pipe and shake it into a plastic bag or whatever I have handy. The greenies I let go, the CTFs get evicted ;-)
    then the pipe goes back into its hole to await the next tendants.

  • manature
    15 years ago

    I think Evelyn has it right. Nothing will happen to them in the pipes. They are just a "trap" so you can catch them and then dispose of them. You will need to check them each morning, and shake the inhabitants out, just like Evelyn described.

    Good luck!
    Marcia

  • solstice98
    15 years ago

    I would bet that they can climb back out but if you check the pipe during the day when they aren't active you can save, evict, freeze or smush, whichever you choose. But if you left them until evening they would get out on their own for nighttime snacking. That's just a guess but since I've watched them climb up a window pane I can't believe the PVC would be a big problem for them.

    Kate

  • buttterflyy
    15 years ago

    Thank you... wonder what you use for bait? - no idea where all those babies went.. We did have a corn snake... I've been wishing him well and happy hunting. Maybe he thought they were appetizers. My husband has offered to do any required smushing.

  • krumz
    15 years ago

    I don't even want to touch the things. I was walking my dog one night, one of them was on the back door and launched itself off my wrist over to a garden wall. Cold and wet. Blech! Last night my husband snapped a few shots of one eating another. They are both cuban tree frogs, yes?

    {{gwi:907695}}

  • buttterflyy
    15 years ago

    The 'victim' looks to me like our native green tree frog. I know there are those who know for certain. Last night as I was weeding I squished about 5 or 8 little ones. First one was hard.. others weren't. No green ones among them.. Ick! Had quite a few green ones last year.. haven't seen any large frogs of any kind, but apparently they've been busy as they were hiding out because we have a huge population of babies.

  • manature
    15 years ago

    Perfect example of why I hate them so much. This is a Cuban treefrog eating a native treefrog (probably a green treefrog, judging by the cream stripe on the side). Notice it is eating a frog that is almost as big as IT is! The picture makes me want to cry!

    Marcia

  • lellie
    15 years ago

    That's just so sad!!!!!!!!!!!

    I've been quite diligent in eradicating any I see or hear in my yard.
    They're easier to locate at night, since they're nocturnal, I believe.
    They particularly come out in the evening if it rains.
    I hunt them down with a vengeance...LOLAM

    I can usually count on them frolicking around the pool.
    Two years ago, I had a pair that would leave over half a dozen huge masses of eggs on the pool water every night for a month!
    I swear...I could never get all the eggs out, either!

    I know there is still one somewhere...at times I can hear it.
    A favorite hiding place is inside an electrical box which hangs on the side wall.
    There's the tiniest crack between the box and the door of it...and somehow...they get in!

    I've learned how to locate them by walking around in wet flip-flops...LOL...they 'answer' the "squeak" when I walk.
    Hehehehehe!!!!!!!!!!!
    They'd do well not to 'answer' my shoes. *Pfffffffffftttttttt!

  • ripctf
    15 years ago

    I need a pair of those flip flops. Well, again tonight I was woken several times by "raah raaah" out by my pond. Due to a lack of frog calling flip flops, I have to sit in waiting until they pipe up. Then, with my flashlight I can quickly locate em and scoop em up with my gloved hand. Smash Smash smoosh smoosh. After 15 minutes, two more down into the great beyond. Looked like Juvenile sized ones. Interstingly enough, inside my screened back porch I found a baby one hopping around - stomp. Now, for the smile maker. Again while smashing the teenagers, I saw a tiny baby Greenie on the wall. :-) He disappeared, but I'm happy to know that maybe... maybe I made his home a little safer tonight. Death to All Cuban Tree Frogs!!

  • manature
    15 years ago

    Amen. (Except of course, those who are actually living where they BELONG and have natural controls keeping the population in check...but that's another story, and one that does NOT pertain to Florida.)

    Marcia

  • wynged_swyne
    15 years ago

    Death to exotic species, flora or fauna! BTW, what's wrong with killing yankees and tourists? You seem to hint that's not a good thing.

  • secuono
    14 years ago

    This is how nature works. Of course humans are messing things up. If we truly cared about nature and things being in their rightful place, we would stop breeding like rats and clean up our lives. We are constantly destroying homes of animals and killing them in the process. We wonder why bears, wolves and other predators are killing people when the answer is so simple! If we stopped expanding and being greedy with food, shelter and unnecessary wants and 'needs', then we wouldn't have these issues. For hundreds of thousands of years, animals have been over taking others and either inter-mixing or destroying them. But humans are going to the extreme for nothing more than self preservation. Which is fine, but not in the obsessive compulsive way we are going about it. We don't need huge houses and cars, tvs, video games, phones, double of everything, things just to make us happy for a moment and then trashed. At the rate we are going, with 7 billion people on the planet, no one will survive. There wont be plants, animals, and no more useless toys, no more hummers or trips to Spain or luxury watches and gadgets. Stop worrying about a frog killing off other native animals, worry about you killing animals because of the things you think you 'need' to live. There was no such thing as cancer before humans showed up, did you know that? Fish never had cancer until we started to pollute their water. We are this planets apocalypse. We do without thinking, without caring, and the outcome is only death. So your house is stained, wash it off and get over it. You have no right to end any persons or animals life, only nature has that right. You are not starving, they are not attacking you, so leave them be.

  • louie_gardner
    13 years ago

    Cuban tree frogs have been in Miami/Florida for hundreds of years. Cuba is a stone throw away and ships using sails have been going back and forth for hundreds of years.

    However when the development boom hit Florida esp Miami many of the green treefrogs were driven out ,died,etc and the Cuban tree who actually thrives and prefers develoments increased in numbers.

    I go herping by Glades which is lush vegetation and rarely see them but see plenty by my house and development.

    Development is the real killer on natives but Cuban tree's are lethal to green anoles and native tree frogs.
    As adults they rarely eat insects and for most part eat other small amphibians and reptiles.

    I kill them as much as possible because they came close to wiping out the green anole population in my yard when I did not.
    Anoles sleep on branches and at night the Cubans eat them.

    I think they should be killed but people should know the difference between them and lets say large green treefrogs because green tree's will also sleep in pvc pipes,etc .

    In my pond I get green tree tads and Cuban tads so don't kill tadpoles untill I know 100% they are only Cuban tree's.

  • louie_gardner
    13 years ago

    Thoughts on killing Cuban Tree Frogs? clip this post email this post what is this?
    see most clipped and recent clippings

    Posted by secuono (My Page) on Sun, Aug 2, 09 at 10:33

    This is how nature works. Of course humans are messing things up. If we truly cared about nature and things being in their rightful place, we would stop breeding like rats and clean up our lives. We are constantly destroying homes of animals and killing them in the process. We wonder why bears, wolves and other predators are killing people when the answer is so simple! If we stopped expanding and being greedy with food, shelter and unnecessary wants and 'needs', then we wouldn't have these issues. For hundreds of thousands of years, animals have been over taking others and either inter-mixing or destroying them. But humans are going to the extreme for nothing more than self preservation. Which is fine, but not in the obsessive compulsive way we are going about it. We don't need huge houses and cars, tvs, video games, phones, double of everything, things just to make us happy for a moment and then trashed. At the rate we are going, with 7 billion people on the planet, no one will survive. There wont be plants, animals, and no more useless toys, no more hummers or trips to Spain or luxury watches and gadgets. Stop worrying about a frog killing off other native animals, worry about you killing animals because of the things you think you 'need' to live. There was no such thing as cancer before humans showed up, did you know that? Fish never had cancer until we started to pollute their water. We are this planets apocalypse. We do without thinking, without caring, and the outcome is only death. So your house is stained, wash it off and get over it. You have no right to end any persons or animals life, only nature has that right. You are not starving, they are not attacking you, so leave them be.
    -----------------
    I agree 100% about humans being the #1 killer.
    Recently it came out that the Glades was becoming more polluted by construction run off toxins plus farming pesticides were finding their way into the Glades and killing native fish not so much non natives killing them like many thought.

    However Cuban tree's are big killers and if you refrain from killing them as I once did than you could say I helped kill green anoles in my yard .
    I now kill them in numbers and the green anoles are coming back.

    Cuban tree's would hide in my plants even during the day and pop up like "jack in the box" and grab green anoles. First time I saw it it startled me (I saved the anole).

    There are some non natives that have no negative impact or close to none and eat tons of mosquitos like house geckos but Cuban tree's of all the non natives are by far the worse.
    The females as 3 to 4 inch heavy adults actively hunt sleeping anoles and native tree frogs as they are to heavy to slow to catch most insects.

    http://img545.imageshack.us/i/ctfv.jpg/

  • Patricia83
    12 years ago

    I have to agree about "disposing" of the cuban tree frogs. I really do not like the idea of doing it, I love all animals! But our zone 9 home has been over taken by cuban tree frogs. There are NO other frogs seen in our yard etc except for the cuban tree frogs. Last year I read that they were considered invasive and how to address it. My son and I captured them and disposed of them to what seemed no end last year. It was horrible, but now with the rain coming more everyday, we actually saw our first NATIVE tree frog, and then we seen a whole bunch of new little tree frogs. We have more geckos and lizards, its beautiful and amazing. I thought for the longest time that our area just did not have any kind of frogs except cubans, well thats because the cubans eat EVERYBODY else. I know it may seem cruel to some people to dispose of them, if even for a greater purpose, like enabling our native species to reproduce, but it needs to be done. A alternative to disposing, set up a frog terrarium and put the ones you catch in there, you can control and stop them from reproducing AND allow them to live. =)

  • julia-fl
    10 years ago

    I collected about 6-7 of those Cuban tree frogs. Even though I could not kill them, I gave them a "life sentence" by putting them under my huge fire pit cover, the top part that looks like a dome. It now an "enclosure" on the ground under bush (so there is a shade during the hot days too). I put some shallow water there for them and some fruits that will perish and create fruit flies. They can eat those or whatever insects happen to be there. I know it might be cruel as well but I think it's better than just killing them. I've made a closeable connection tube between them and outside which I will use to insert more cuban frogs as I find them. They are cannibals and might eat each other and self-distract. I will take a picture tomorrow. Me and my husband we joking about collecting and sending them back to Cuba. This picture shows one sitting in the pitcher plant.

  • julia-fl
    10 years ago

    Here is picture of that enclosure outside for Cuban tree frogs

  • zzackey
    10 years ago

    Wouldn't it poison my chickens if I fed them to the chickens? Just found out they are only about 90 minutes from us. Not happy at all. Didn't think they would live this far north. We can get down to 9 degrees some winters. Ready to kill them if I can know for sure it is one. Googled and read several sites. I think I can ID one if I have to. I never killed anything but lubbers, fire ants and mosquitos so far. This will be far from easy.

  • wallisadi
    10 years ago

    This GW is really getting boring........no plant or bloom pictures, just rants about killing frogs, seems to be the " hot topic!" Try growing something, buy a camera, dirt cheap, and post something you've grown......FB.....positive! Have met gardeners from China to Oregon.....just my take.......M

  • zzackey
    10 years ago

    Sorry this bothers you. Some posts like this are really needed! I never thought i would see them this far north, but they are only about 35 miles away now. I am very concerned. Any info I can get on them is much appreciated. Maybe you can find something fun on another site?

  • shear_stupidity
    10 years ago

    I've got a question. Are the natives always green? I've got a ton of "flesh-colored" frogs and I'm not sure what constitutes a "large" toe pad. Blue bones? I can't tell when they're hopping around! I had one land on my FACE yesterday as I was opening an outdoor umbrella. Ew! I'm fairly " live and let live" in my yard, but as I stated on another thread, the rise in flesh colored frogs has coincided with a decline in other species in my yard. I do NOT want to mistakenly kill the wrong frog. I've researched and googled and still don't feel confident I can correctly identify. Any help?

  • zzackey
    10 years ago

    The University of Florida had a good site with lots of pictures and info. Quoting from the website. They have warts on their backs. If they are bigger than 2.5 inches, they are not native and probably are Cubans. I think it said they can get up to 8 or 9 inches in length. They can be white, tan, green with grayish stripes and the toe pad ends are bigger. It also has a frog ID sound if you can find the play button. I couldn't find it on my screen. Supposed to go Mroak. I rarely see our frogs. Just hear them singing in the forest around us.

  • jofus, ( Englewood, Fl zone 10a )
    10 years ago

    To Zackey & all the other intuitive and savy people who have contributed to this discussion, - right on !
    Two days ago I purchased six 3 ft long pvc pipes and installed them in my backyard as the University of Florida suggested. Next morning - nothing. But this morning I found one native green treefrog hiding out, plus two of the invasive, obnoxious Cubans. Also found one Cuban sitting on a broad mango leaf nearby.
    The native was freed and the three Cubans were immediately dispatched into frog heaven.
    The hand - wringing, " compassionate " Cuban frog lovers might ask,.." Were they humanely euthanized ? "
    Don't ask !

    This post was edited by jofus on Tue, Sep 10, 13 at 13:42

  • Kasima
    10 years ago

    I had a large female Cuban get into my aviary and try to eat one of my birds. Did I freeze her? You betcha!

  • TexasTransport
    10 years ago

    I wish they would just disappear. Today I opened my hot tub cover. Two of them were there in a 95 degree tub. Such a nasty mess around the edges. I attempted shoo'ing them out with a broom. One jumped out, the other, went for a swim. They are so creepy looking. Reading about killing them in a "humane" manner. How do you guys catch them to euthanize them? Since they kill Florida frogs, we may start killing them.

  • wallisadi
    10 years ago

    Go back to Texas .......

  • shaggy13
    10 years ago

    Kill the buggers. Grew up in Tampa, never saw one as a kid, saw two while visiting ,caught them both before I knew what they were. Caused sneezing profusely and skin irritation. Also crapped on new truck and etched paint . They kill the croaking greenies I used to catch as a kid. This frog is a plague like Obama.

  • Carol love_the_yard (Zone 9A Jacksonville, FL)
    9 years ago

    Apparently there is another way. I was gifted a stack of pots yesterday... found this in between...

  • jofus, ( Englewood, Fl zone 10a )
    9 years ago

    Hmmm, may have to remember that method ! ( smile )
    It's been over a year now since I saw my first Cuban Tree frog here in SW Fla. and am sad to say they are still here, but in much lower numbers. Still see 5 or 6 jumping out of the way of my riding mower each week while mowing the lawn.
    I also have to say that I haven't seen a native " Greenie " in over 8 months either !
    I smile sardonically whenever I read some member complaining about this dialogue, saying we should " move on,..post pics of plants instead. " I have been dealing with these ravenous monsters on an everyday basis, and do not believe that sticking our heads in the sand is the answer.
    My white, 1 1/2 in diameter PVC pipes are still working great,..eliminating over a dozen of these slimy predators a month (with my help )
    Am glad to see there are still people out there who are continuing the fight.

  • sheshestuff
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    It all started with a good sized frog that we would see in and around our small garden tool shed at the pool. We live just north of Orlando and recently moved. When we moved, the shed went into storage - for 4 1/2 months. When we finally moved the shed from storage, guess who was there, healthy as could be - and with a friend, no less! We had no idea the 'poor things' were in there, much less how they could still be alive in that heat, with no food or water. And boy, can they hide!! Now the 6'h x2'x2' is home to as many as eight Cuban Tree Frogs every day! I think all but one are female, that's how they roll, one guy with his harem! They sleep all day and hunt all night. Our daughter volunteered to annihilate them for us. Those darn frogs have decimated our green anole population. Our backyard has many brown anoles, but only ONE green left. He cocks his head watching me, then goes back to licking the sweet base of the flower buds. All my life living in central Florida I have adored green anoles. Never even knew about or saw a brown one until vacationing near St.Pete Beach as an adult. Now they've moved farther north and browns are everywhere, and greens are scarce. Brown ones are much more aggressive, especially in mating season. I'll try to attach recent pix I took of 2 males fighting to the death. Over a girl. Not a pretty girl.

    Little eggs they buried are currently hatching and we have tiny brown babies all over the place. How I wish they were green...

    STOP WISHING - GET RID of the___ FROGS !!!!!!!

  • Michael AKA Leekle2ManE
    8 years ago

    Just so you know, the brown anoles will eat smaller green anoles and are also know to interbreed. I will also say this, while I still think of my yard as a very sunny yard, as my 'canopy' plants slowly mature, I seem to find more and more greens. Not enough to say I have a lot of them, but enpugh that they are closer to Uncommon than Rare.

  • bea (zone 9a -Jax area)
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    Without getting into a philosophical argument of whether it's right or wrong to kill these frogs if one is going to kill them please do so humanely. Here is what U of FL suggests: "Capture Cuban tree frogs in a plastic bag to avoid contact with the 'slime' they secrete. The most humane way to euthanize Cuban Treefrogs is by liberally applying benzocaine (20%) to the back or belly of the frog. At your local drugstore, you can find a variety of products containing 20% benzocaine -- first aid or burn sprays and toothache gels or liquids. After you apply the benzocaine, the Cuban Treefrog will quickly become unconscious. Next, seal the plastic bag and put it into the freezer overnight. By the next day, you can be sure that the Cuban Treefrog will not wake up (which would be inhumane), and can dispose of the bag."

  • Desiree Cluett
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    I love frogs, I find them fascinating, all species... I know about the impact that the Cuban Tree Frog has on our own native species but I can't bring myself to kill them, I live in Gainesville Florida and have only come across two CTF and have captured both and they now live in a terrarium... I understand that everyone has their own opinions on the matter but if you do your research the American Bullfrog is also a frog that will eat ANYTHING it can put in its mouth and swallow... I know this post is going to probably get a lot of negative comments but I find the CTF cute, even the big ones. I don't get upset at people if they want to kill them because I believe in, to each his own.. I have had George now for several months (my first CTF) and have become pretty attached, it has grown in size quit fast so I can see the concern about them and the negative impact they have on our native species which I find absolutely adorable but like I said I just can't kill the CTF. Before I end my post let me make this very clear to anyone who reads this post, If there ever comes a time that I can no longer care for or keep my CTF I WILL NOT RERELEASE them back into the wild I will have someone who can humanely get rid of them do so or I will take them to the UF and give them to the professor there....

  • rosesr4me
    8 years ago

    I don't think you'll get many negative comments from your post or at least you shouldn't. The fact that you're keeping them contained rather than leaving them out in the wild to breed is a good thing...as long as you are not allowing to breed. When it comes time that you can no longer take care for them taking them UF is an option. I live in Tampa otherwise I would offer to humanely dispose of them :-)

  • Desiree Cluett
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    rosesr4me(z9 FL_west) I don't know the sex of the two I have but breeding is not something I would do plus they have two water dishes in their tank that I clean daily so no babies for them, they may do the dirty, lol, but that is all that they will be doing, no babies for them... And I live 10 miles for the UF so if the time comes that I have to get rid of them they will definitely end up there not back in the wild, Tampa is a bit of a drive just to come and put two frogs to sleep, lol, so I understand.... ;-)

  • Monique McCulley-Leonard
    3 years ago

    Cuban tree frogs are promptly euthanized on my property. I capture them with a gallon zip lock bag
    that has been sprayed with Dermoplast. It knocks them unconscious. Once they are comatose in the
    freezer they go...for 3 days. They are nasty invasive predators on our native lizards, toads, and baby fledgling birds. I’ve seen them young, small, huge, pale green, almost white, zebra striped, and brown.
    Their suction cup toes and obvious thumb is the identifying trait. They mostly come out at dusk, and thru the night. I hope people realize the negative threat they impose to our natural environment.
    Bye bye Cuban frog.

  • HU-559351276
    3 years ago

    I need to ID Tadpoles if Cubans? In nightlight .white pearly belly coppery sides & eyes , spiral design belly innards? I have pics from egg clutch 9/5 - Hatch 9/6-7 - now 10/4 600+ was orig approx 1,000 . Had approx 400 die off from tap water ? I was ignorant it was lethal 🤷‍♀️.So i mead to get proper iD ASAP 🙏HELP anyone,I don’t want to kill anything but if invasive I will . Many pics if it will help . Found dead frog in egg area days before eggs , extended approx 11” , big toe pads, whitish bk yellow devide strip between belly & bk on both sides? Torn leg skin. evidence seems to say Cubans but not convinced.HELP PLEASE



  • HU-167020567
    2 years ago

    hey everybody I thought I would just share I too am in Florida however I am not a reptile person and as soon as I read about the freezer theory I said these people are nuts there's no way ever I will freeze a frog in my freezer so honestly I bought a paintball gun on Amazon I've had them explode now while this is hard for some I guess to do it's a lot easier for me to shoot this thing in the back with either 43 caliber PPQ t4E paintball gun - using actual paintballs is completely fine those will work however I have found that the 11mm UX cell carbon steel magnetic ball bearings work the best you're talking one and done however I live near a very popular trail with owls possums coyotes alligators I mean you name it it's back in those woods So I let the snakes handle them and I do tend to go back and an hour or so make sure the frog has been picked up by a raccoon or another animal but I mean half the time one shot and then you don't have to whack hack attk with the shovel - just use the show to see the tiny hole put the frog in and pack it down lol is that okay to do in a piece of yard you're never using?

  • HU-167020567
    2 years ago

    to answer the previous question I use what's called the lens feature on the Google pixel however I'm sure on the iPhone just take a picture of the frog and when you're looking at the actual picture on your device you use something called lens if you're on Android however I'm sure if iOS there's some type of search because I always make sure I scan the frog make sure to CFT and then I guess go to town

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