Seacoast rustic modern kitchen contemporary-kitchen
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Seacoast rustic modern kitchen Contemporary Kitchen, Boston

Rob Karosis Photography
URL
http://www.pattykennedyinteriors.com
Inspiration for a contemporary kitchen remodel in Boston with flat-panel cabinets, white cabinets and stainless steel appliances — Houzz

This photo has 5 questions

newdigs1 wrote:
Hi, I would love to know where the pot racks are from, please. Thanks
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fiddlerwaite
High and lie end items--everyone thinks one needs to spend spend spend but no need as you can see :)
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PRO
Patty Kennedy Interiors, LLC
I store the pot lids in a rack in the bottom cabinet drawer.
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Catharine wrote:
How do you protect the wall from iron pans - My renovated kitchen will have pans on the perpendicular wall of my cooking run. Kind of like this picture. But I will have an induction range and I use cast iron pots. I am afraid that the wall will get marked and chipped. Any suggestions on protection. My husband suggested clear acrylic panel.
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PRO
Patty Kennedy Interiors, LLC
Acrylic will become scratched over time. Perhaps you could cover the wall with a neutral vinyl wallpaper that can be scrubbed or use a scrubbable enamel paint.
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dramback

Not to be negative, but who has shiny clean looking pans over the course of time, that you would want to hang up?

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nimasha wrote:
pot racks - hey! i f u don't mind can u just tellme from where did u get tjose pot racks? pls...
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PRO
Patty Kennedy Interiors, LLC
They are GRUNDTAL rails from IKEA…you can buy the hooks there too.
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PRO
Patty Kennedy Interiors, LLC
They are GRUNDTAL racks from IKEA…you can buy the hooks there too.
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merlelang wrote:
I am looking for a teapot, this one looks great. what is the make?
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PRO
Patty Kennedy Interiors, LLC
I don't know the teapot manufacturer...it was purchased a few years ago at a TJ Maxx outlet.
Sorry!
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sonasuresh wrote:
hi, i would like to know , if its ideal to propose a switch point here - the water drained vessels hung up and a switch point in the lower wall area , is it really ideal?
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What Houzz contributors are saying:

Jennifer Ott Design added this to Hang 'Em or Hide 'Em: 10 Stylish Ways to Store Pots and Pans
The first thing to decide is whether you want your cookware on view or hidden. This is a personal preference; some people like the look of hanging pots and pans, and others prefer a clean, uncluttered look. If you don’t cook often, I’d recommend storing your pots and pans in a pantry or closed cabinet, so they don’t collect grease and dust.
Kathryn Peltier Design added this to Going Up: Vertical Storage Holds More Kitchen Stuff
Pots and pans take up more precious cabinet space than just about anything else, so hanging them on an otherwise empty wall makes sense. There are rails made specifically for this purpose; galvanized pipe or even some towel bars could work too. Just make sure to anchor them well.
Laura Gaskill added this to Create Your Own Checklist for a Well-Stocked Kitchen
CookwareStockpotSmall and medium saucepans with lidsDutch ovenCast iron skilletMedium and/or large skilletNonstick omelet panSteamer or steam basketTeapotNice extras:Roasting pan with rackButter warmerPan for deep fryingMesh splatter guardLobster potStylish ways to store pots and pans
Emily Hutchinson added this to Telltale Signs You Live in a Shared House
Your kitchen cabinets are booby traps. Everyone comes with an assortment of things when they move in. This means clutter can accumulate pretty quickly. One of the clutter hotspots is in the kitchen, where dishes, pots, pans and cutlery stack up. Opening a cabinet in a shared house can mean risking death by casserole pot as it falls from a high shelf. Tip: Have a go at hanging your pots and pans. It’s a simple solution to eliminate kitchen clutter, and you can buy hanging strips that won’t damage the walls if you live in a rental. You could also make the most of display shelves by putting your best glassware, mugs and bowls out where everyone can see them.
Kate Burt added this to 99 Ingenious Ideas to Steal for Your Small Kitchen
85. Layer your rails. Why stop at one hanging rail when you can have three? That’s an entire cabinet you’ve just freed up.
Becky Harris added this to Renting? 15 Ways to Make Your Kitchen Your Own
Here’s the more common and practical way to transform an empty wall with pot railings. This will take a slight amount of repair work if your landlord wants them taken down when you move.
Becky Harris added this to 10 Bright Ideas for Displaying Pots and Pans
7. Save space with rails. You don’t have to have a large central spot or custom railings and racks to keep your cookware beautifully displayed. This wall is shiny with the mix of metal pots and pans hung efficiently from inexpensive pot rails and hooks from Ikea.
Urban Casa added this to Small Living 101: Smart Space Savers for Your Kitchen Walls
2. Pot Rail A pot rail, also called a utensil rack, is a versatile kitchen gadget that accommodates a lot more than just pots. This thin metal pole or strip with S-hooks allows you to hang almost anything that can lay partially flat and has a hole in its handle (for the hook). Think cutting boards, measuring cups, potholders and most cooking utensils. Found in the kitchen section of most home or hardware stores, and with varying lengths from 18 to 36 inches, pot rails can usually fit the space on the side of a cabinet, in a small nook or above the stove.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

HU-178392045 added this to webuser_178392045's ideas
That's a must have for all the pots and pans we use.
dolezald added this to Kitchen Ideas
Pots and Pans on rail in compact kitchen

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