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nancy_mcconnell85

shower floor shape with herringbone wall

last month

I am turning a 59” tub into a walk-in shower w/curb. I’ve decided on a glossy 2 x 10 white subway tile for the shower walls. I was thinking a glossy 1” hexagon or unglazed penny tile for the shower floor (not sure if unglazed is a nightmare to keep clean). The shower will have a full glass enclosure and a 75” white shaker vanity with Pompeii sienna quartz counter top and curb. There will be 12” from the edge of the vanity to the glass enclosure. I’m concerned the hexagon will be too busy for the herringbone.
I know some have suggested a 12 x 24 tile for the shower wall. My concern was having 12 x 24 on the floor and the shower walls. I’ve attached pics of tiles and space as well as my inspiration herringbone. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.

Comments (16)

  • last month

    Here is a pic of my herringbone inspiration

  • last month

    What’s the plan for the vanity?

  • last month

    It’s a 75” white shaker vanity with Pompeii sienna quartz

  • PRO
    last month

    Herringbone is double labor. Stick with the 12x24.

  • last month

    Can I use the same tile for the bathroom floor and shower walls?

  • PRO
    last month

    I like simple few grout lines and matching grout with 12 x24 porcelain tile on both bathroom floor and shower walls . No unglazed tile ever in a water drenched space . Herringbone very expensive and honestly too busy IMO in a small space . The simpler the finishes the longer thye will be nice to look at and work with. As for the shower floor I use the same rile but smaller for that . This gives you the opportunity down the road to change accessories, wall colr stc with no big hassle keep the counter simple too .

  • last month

    Thank you for the info on the unglazed tile. I knew it didn’t seem right, just needed someone else to say it. I like the 12 x 24 tile in the shower but am happy to know that I can use the same tile. The quartz is simple so that works. Thanks again

  • PRO
    last month

    Here are showers with herringbone tile.



  • last month

    Thank you, I think the hexagon looks good, I do really love herringbone pattern. Do you think 3 walls is too much with herringbone?

  • PRO
    last month

    If it's a simple plain colored tile for a heringbone, it is not too much. Unless it is too much for your budget, being that it will cost double.

  • last month

    You can always just do the back wall of the shower in herringbone. Or do the floor of the room in herringbone and the shower all 12 X 24. The shower floor should be matte, not glossy tile. Hexagon is easier to lay correctly than penny tiles. If you use penny tiles, make sure your installer is really good. I have read a lot of posts from people on this forum who were unhappy with their penny tile installation.


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  • last month

    You love the herringbone. If you can afford it, go for it. Use a narrow tile, like you have picked out, and a grout similar in color to the tile and it won't look too busy. Contrasting grout lines will make it too chaotic. A hex will look great with your herringbone so long as it isn't too big and has a subtle grout color.


    Is glazed and unglazed an actual designation or are you applying those names to tiles that feel shiny or not shiny to the touch? Some idiot who designed our bathroom put in tiny shiny, shiny hex on the bathroom floor and it is a friggin skating rink. Take the DCOF rating to heart:


    "DCOF is represented as a decimal between 0.01 and 1.0, with higher decimals representing a higher rate of traction. While no tile option can be entirely slip-proof, a tile with a DCOF rating of ≥0.42 is considered safe to use in both residential and commercial settings."


    Daltile makes loads of hex tiles that are .42 DCOF rated. They are inexpensive. Lots of colors. They feel slightly rough to the touch compared to slick shiny tiles. The traction is great.


    Everyone says that the grout lines in a small mosaic tile provide enough traction that you don't need DCOF rating. I say to those people, come step on my bathroom floor when you get out of the shower. Lots of grout. Zero traction.


  • last month

    These herringbone walls are all in showers your size. Notice how they feel more or less chaotic based on the length and width of the tile and the color grout. Some of these feel headache inducing. Others are really pleasing - particularly the green one and the one below the green one. I like that you get a lot of repeat.









  • last month

    Hi Kendra, thank you for your response, I see what you are saying about the herringbine with a wider tile. The longer thinner tile looks better to me and I do love it. I also prefer to have the grout the same as the tile and thin. Regarding the shower floor tile the store had “unglazed” penny rated for shower floor.. so glad I asked. I’d look at it and think this going to be a nightmare to keep clean. I’ll look at Daltile. Thanks again.

  • last month

    Use epoxy grout. Nothing sticks to it or grows on it; no scrubbing needed, ever, in my experience. It’s apparently a little more difficult to work with, so some tilers will grumble about it, but I’ll never have another kind again.

  • last month

    Thank you for the tip Olychick, I’ll look into it.