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RedRyder

Years ago I owned a 1925 colonial. My contractor and I talked about pulling up all the old kitchen floors (what a hoot seeing all the designs!) and get to what we suspected was a wood floor. He sent over his best team leader to do the job. Luckily it was all vinyl's and linoleums underneath

That poor man wouldn't scrape the tar, fearing it would damage what turned out to be a fabulous chestnut floor. He almost quit but was just as happy as I was that it all came out beautifully and now matched the entire house of wood floors.

Keep in mind you will go through LOTS of sanding paper. Our tiny kitchen used more than a dozen!

   
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celestina89

@RedRyder: Interesting that the 1925 colonial had chestnut floor. The most common and affordable wood flooring in the 1920s was Oak. Pine was second most popular. American Chestnut was either non-existent or extremely expensive due to a dastardly blight at the turn of the century (1900s). It began in 1904. This took the American Chestnut tree from the most popular and predominant tree species throughout the eastern half of the US to extinction within a few short years. It killed more than 4 billion American Chestnuts. It also spread throughout the world. Today it's being regrown. The American Chestnut was used on many, many floors of homes in the US from 1700-1900. Many of today's chestnut trees are from China that are more blight resistant. The few American Chestnuts that did survive the blight were bred by American Chestnut Foundation to make them resistant to the killer disease.

It's possible the floor in the 1925 colonial came from other sources than the great American Chestnut. Fascinating history of the great American Chestnut.

   
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Brian
I posted this on another part of the site but maybe I'll fine people here who have experienced what I found an give advice.

My wife and I are doing quite a bit of remodeling. We are doing a complete new kitchen and new floors. We planned to remove the old tile to place new tile and found it to be quite difficult. When we started to remove the tile, we noticed that the durock an thinset or concrete is stuck together so bad that we would need to remove both and place new durock throughout the house. Underneath the thinset/concrete and durock, there's hardwood floors. From what I can tell is that there may be nails every foot or so.

My options are:

1. Lay tile over tile
2. Remove and replace durock and thinset/concrete, then add new tile
3. Try to salvage the hardwood floor by removing the nails, add wood filler and refinish the floor.

I attached a picture of what I found. Also, keep in mind the kitchen cabinets are removed.


After posting all of this, I ended up speaking with someone I've known for a few years who has remodeled several homes in the area and has come across this several times. He highly recommends to remove the tile and refinish the floor. He said he's seen much worse. I'm considering this option cause it's like getting a floor for almost nothing. He believes that this is oak, which he says it's easy to get new wood planks to match. He says most likely it's pine in the kitchen. I may try to take a little more off and see what it looks like.

Thoughts?
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