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celestina89

Heat pump dryers have been in Europe for years & years - all the ones I've seen are vent-less. A few have been introduced into the US such as LG, Bosch, GE and Whirlpool but average about $1400-1500. That's 3-4x more expensive than the average dryer - electric or gas operated.

Heat pumps work more efficiently in lots of areas in the US without wide temperature swings. It remains to be seen which areas will be more practicable than others for a heat pump dryer. They do take two to 4 times longer to dry clothes than conventional vented dryers. And it can be a tough sell in the deep humid hot south using a heat exchanger.

Here's a link for more information if anyone is interested.

   
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Michael

celestina89 I have used the Blomberg heat pump dryer and it does not take up 2 to 4 times longer to dry. Ventless dryers for the most part are in 24 inch front loading laundry. (Whirlpool is the exception LG has to be vented)) Years ago ventless (condensing dryers) took longer to dry because the spin cycle on the washers was 1000 rpm or less. now they spin up to 1400 rpm so the clothes do not come out as wet. Also you are washing the clothes in about 3 to 5 gallons of water vs. up to 13 gallons with top load models.

The front load 24 inch handle about same as some of the top load washers as the user is not to load the laundry above the agitator. (Most consumers do not read the instruction on washers).

Today I am using a Miele washer and dryer and do not see much difference in the dry time. There are only 2 of us in the household so a full size front load washer doesn't make sense for us.

Yes in the USA 24 inch cost more but most are fully featured models. I do not think any mfg. manufactures 24 inch front load washers in the USA. In fact there are more brands of 24 inch sold in the USA than full size laundry.

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goodewyfe

I live in an apartment, so no line drying. Frankly, even if I didn't, I doubt I'd line dry. Since I live in SoCal, I'd be concerned that the clothes would not stay clean. Separately. I wondered about the idea of washing everything on cold when I've read that the way to kill germs is to wash things like towels and bedding on hot.

   

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