Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens


Services Provided
Personal attention for each client and their unique landscape, from the first consultation to plant lists, nursery visits, and layout. We work with DIY home gardeners to churches, schools, and small business to jump start and guide your landscape decisions -- anything we can do to increase native plant ecosystems and wildlife organically. Consults and design both in person and online.

Areas Served
Lincoln and Omaha Nebraska region, as well as online.

Business Description
Monarch Gardens is a landscape consulting business focused on native prairie plants, low maintenance design, and providing habitat for wildlife in all four seasons. We consult on site, visit nurseries with clients, deliver and order plants, create landscape plans with detailed horticultural info, and suggest organic options. Butterfly and interactive children's gardens are a specialty.

Certification and Awards
2012 Apartment Therapy Best Outdoor Space
Location:
Lincoln, NE US 
Contact:
Benjamin Vogt 
Type:
 
Address:
Lincoln, NE 68522 
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens commented on an ideabook

What Monarch Butterflies Taught Me About Garden Design

Thinking like a butterfly leads to fresh perspectives in the garden and in life Full Story
     Comment   12 hours ago
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
I have a 6' wood fence over 2/3 of the area, and 4' chain link fence on the rest -- so if deer wanted in they'd have no problem. When we move to the country I'll have a 1 acre display garden which will certainly have some sort of deer fence (8' tall or a double fence), but how to make that attractive? I wouldn't worry at all about the butterflies. You'll have to do your research on deer resistant plants, but even then, we all know if they're hungry enough, nothing really is deer resistant.
12 hours ago     
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roxieks
If you add about 7 copper pennies dated before 1982 in birdbath it will help keep the algae from growing. Before that date the pennies contained copper a natural algicide or you could use a copper pipe. It will work good unless the temperature rises 90* or higher for extended periods of time.
4 hours ago   
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roxieks
Also use a terracotta base for pots and place a few flat rocks and 1/2" water the butterflies and bees will gather there to drink. Since the terracotta also absorbs water, using another base fill with about an 1" of water, the birds will gather too. Place them in the shade so the small amount of water does not get too hot before it evaporates. A few colorful objects will also attract the butterflies, bees and birds.
4 hours ago   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens commented on an ideabook

Autumn Joy: How to Get 3 Months of Fall Flowers

Enjoy blooms from September to November by mixing 6 asters native to different areas of the U.S. Full Story
     Comment   last Saturday
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Trilliums Landscaping & Horticulture
Benjamin, do you consider big leaf aster or white woodland aster to be native to your region? do you grow them in your garden? I sometimes questions myself on what I should consider "native plants", do I limit them to plants growing within 50 miles, 100 miles, 200 miles or more, do I include plants that show up in the recent fossil record or have been recorded in the past, but don't currently grow in my area, should I grow plants that aren't native yet but will be better adapted as the climate changes? Please let me know your take on "what is a native plant".
last Saturday at 9:28AM   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
Trilliums -- let's talk about climate change: native plants could not be better adapted to it! They are used to the local and regional climate, boom / bust cycles of temp and rain, esp when properly sited. I don't subscribe to the theory that we know better then evolutionary nature in any shape or form, and the talk about "better adapted plants" too often means exotics we know nothing about (how they will interact not just in the near future, but the far future). We spread plants willy nilly for "beauty" over ecosystem services, when it should at least be a 50/50 proposition. That's my rant there.

I generally think we should try to grow plants as native to our locale as possible -- sometimes that means a 10 mile radius, sometimes 50, sometimes 200. If you live in Wyoming your radius will likely be larger, whereas if you are in northern California or southern Florida it might be a lot smaller (more niche ecosystems, you know, of course I'm grossly generalizing here). I grow both of those asters, but I probably would not use them in a new garden because there are plenty of local asters to choose from. What's native? Drive to a wildlife preserve or restoration and look. Or an old cemetery. I do so enjoy the facetious argument that, well, gingko trees once grew here so is that native? Or, shouldn't we just consider hosta native because it's planted everywhere?
last Saturday at 9:37AM     
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens published an ideabook

Great Design Plant: Dwarf Blue Indigo Offers Carefree Beauty

Drought tolerant and a bumblebee magnet, spiky Baptisia australis may be the easiest plant you ever grow Full Story
     Comment   last Friday
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Barnhart Gallery
Yes Sigrid, it does resemble Sweet Pea, except that it's a rounded clump of stalks rather than a meandering vine, so, it's a tidier, manicured look. I have them in blue and butter, and although they have a short bloom time, they look great all season for their fresh greenery.
last Saturday at 7:52PM   
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Edward Skrine
Planted this from seed, bought at Mount Vernon gift store. Hoping it comes up next spring.
10 hours ago   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens commented on a discussion
   Comment   last Wednesday
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
It's not ironweed. It is Liatris ligulistylis, a monarch magnet native to the northern Plains. Ironweed looks quite a bit different. :)
last Wednesday at 6:11PM   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens commented on an ideabook

Make This Fall’s Garden the Best Ever

Planning to plant in autumn? Learn the most important tip for preventing buyer’s remorse, plus get more valuable buying and planting advice Full Story
     Comment   last Wednesday
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
Let's take that advice about buying smaller trees and transplant it (pun intended) to buying perennials and grasses -- small plugs will establish faster and catch up with larger, pricier pots within a year. Save money, buy plugs.
last Wednesday at 8:41AM     
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acw2355
I generally buy smaller containers. So many nurseries are now going to #2 containers and charging double when what you get is just more soil. And, I now check for root-bound plants because I've often come home paying full price for a plant only to find it with jammed up roots. Let the buyer beware.
14 hours ago     
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52grace
Sometimes in order to get occupancy the landscape must be completed on new construction. They may not have had a choice. Hopefully watering is part of the installation cost.
7 hours ago   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens commented on an ideabook

How to Find the Right Native Plants for Your Yard

Find plant maps, sale sites and guides that make going native in the garden easier than ever Full Story
     Comment   last Wednesday
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
bdijackie -- See if anyone who writes for Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens lives near you and ask away. I'm sure there are lots of plant adapted for that situation, I just don't know what they are living here in flyover country.
last Wednesday at 5:33AM   
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bdijackie
I'll look into the resource, thanks. To make our area more challenging, Sandy dumped layers of sand everywhere killing everything in its path.
last Wednesday at 5:37AM   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens bookmarked an ideabook

10 Ways Passive Solar Design Can Slash Your Energy Bills

The money you'll save over time is a powerful incentive to work with nature rather than against her during your new build or renovation Full Story
     Comment   August 24, 2014
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Great Native Plant: Grow Wild Quinine for Its Unique Clusters of Blooms

Get connoisseur cred and unique blooms with this uncommon plant. Bonus assets: It’s low maintenance and drought tolerant Full Story
     Comment   August 24, 2014
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ghewlett
Found Quinine and Milkweed seeds at wildflowerfarm.com. Huge selection of native plants!
June 12, 2014 at 7:00AM     
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6 Native Goldenrods Worth a Second Look

Goldenrod gets a bad rap as being aggressive, but these more mannerly choices offer a bunch of benefits Full Story
     Comment   August 24, 2014
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Candy DeBerry
Ben, you need to add my favorite to your list: Solidago caesia (blue-stem goldenrod, wreath goldenrod). Thrives in dry shade or semi-shade, grows to about knee-high, gently self-seeds, and is covered in yellow flowers (and pollinators) from late August - October here in SW PA.
August 22, 2014 at 10:50AM     
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Butterfly Gardening: Delight the Eyes With Living Sculptures

Surprise and thrill with a garden that attracts magical winged creatures, bringing color, movement and life Full Story
     Comment   August 21, 2014
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Thom Pirson
I've been interested in bringing natives back into my neighborhood, so year by year I've been redoing the planters around my house with natives. Last year, the beds next to the driveway and the path to the back yard got Wild Geranium, Wild Ginger, Bee Balm, Salvia, Butterfly Weed, Ostrich & Cinnamon Fern, New England Aster and Phlox. Still need a little time to establish with the hard winter we had (Hamburg, NY, just outside Buffalo), but they look great

This past spring, it was the front planters turn, I pulled out the hosta (repurposed to establish a new bed on the other side of the yard for next year and lilac (allergic to lilac anyway) that made up the front planter and replanted with all natives. I planted thin this year to see how each would do under the conditions.
Back Row: Oakleaf Hydrangea, Viburnum nudum, and dwarf Chamaecyparis
Middle Row: Viginia Blue Bells,Columbine, Foamflower, Heuchera,
Front Row: Winterberry and Bunchberry (they're fighting me, but starting to spread a little)

Also, I received a butterfly and hummingbird garden kit from Prairie Moon Nursery and put in a bed in the backyard. It's been a struggle to fight off the rabbits that keep eating the coneflowers, but it's starting to fill out.

Just yesterday I discovered that a nursery between my work and home had 5' tall Spicebush (Lindera benzoin) out front for $10 a piece! It was a bit difficult to pick out the females from the males, but I think was able to pick out 1 male and two female for the backyard.

I haven't seen any butterflies other than the small white ones (quick google says they are literally called Small White?) but hoping for more once the gardens get established!
August 21, 2014 at 12:00PM     
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens is following Thomas Wheaton Garden Design, LLC
August 20, 2014
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens bookmarked an ideabook

Follow Nature’s Lead for Artful Stacked Stones

Surprise and delight in the landscape with rock formations resembling wildland hoodoos and cairns Full Story
     Comment   August 19, 2014
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Michael Davidson
Karen - it's at the Weald and Downland Museum in West Sussex. You'll see these saddle stones right across the southern counties of England.
August 23, 2014 at 6:41PM   
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summery
Love Andy Goldsworthy's work - his books are glorious.

Our farm is currently an inukshuk training ground - it's currently being tile-drained, and the farmer got a bit bored, and started creating somewhat haphazard inukshuks all over the place with his excavator - they look awesome, literally, as they're HUGE!

Karen - you didn't include standing stones. You can find them dotted around the countryside all over Scotland, and further afield. Stonehenge is quite a well-known example. They're also called menhirs: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menhir
Eclectic Backyard Garden High Plains Desert Garden
last Monday at 10:36AM   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens is following Sett Studio
August 17, 2014
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens bookmarked an ideabook

Time-Tested, Low-Tech Ways to Cool a Home

People have been beating the heat around the world for centuries without plugging anything in. Could these ideas work for your home today? Full Story
     Comment   August 15, 2014
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debluetailfly
The Fulton mansion in Fulton, TX had a ship's sail mounted on the front to direct breezes into the master bedroom. The floor joists are adjoining 2x6s, creating a solid floor. The house has survived being hit by a ship during a hurricane, thought they say the ship was destroyed.
August 10, 2014 at 4:27PM     
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bublibrar
Courtyard
August 20, 2014 at 11:36AM   
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How to Design a Garden That Lasts

Climates are changing. Wildlife is evolving. Can your garden keep up? Full Story
     Comment   August 15, 2014
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Pamela Bateman Garden Design
Benjamin~ Great article with tips on how to design a garden for our changing climate.
July 23, 2014 at 7:31AM     
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Great Garden Combo: 6 Beautiful Plants for a Shady, Wet Site

Transform a shade garden with moisture-loving golden grasses, textural leaves and a sprinkling of flowers Full Story
     Comment   August 15, 2014
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Bliss Garden Design
Bebop730 - I designed the garden featured in this article. It was a very shady site with large conifers and big leaf maples that only allowed filtered light. The catalpa did fine as did all the the other plants mentioned in Karen's article. It was an appropriate garden to do a feature on shade gardening.
August 14, 2014 at 9:02PM     
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens published an ideabook

4 Elements of a Stunning Fall Garden

Late summer is a good time to look beyond trees to create an autumn landscape that draws the eye and stirs the soul Full Story
     Comment   August 15, 2014
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April Barry
This is my husband's flower garden in the woods in fall--it does a great job of camouflaging our raised-bed septic tank all summer.
August 18, 2014 at 2:08PM     
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Jon Curtis
While fall leads us into shorter days and lower sun, to me gives me the chance to tweak what's going on in my gardens. What went crazy over the summer? What is showing different color now? What is blooming and what will extend my blooms into the colder, shorter days when a little brightness goes a long way? What do I have that might release a scent as I brush by or can be caught on the wind? I loved this article for the other thoughts I gives me to consider. Thank you.
August 20, 2014 at 9:23AM     
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens updated their profile
August 14, 2014
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens likes an ideabook

Great Design Plant: Verbena Stricta Tolerates Tough Spots

With its subtle beauty and long-lasting flowers, this pollinator pleaser is a boon to wilder areas Full Story
     Comment   August 14, 2014
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dardidit
i handle the photo rights and despite my zoology degree i don't flesh out the site my best buddy does. also they're in GA and I'm up in MA. we could use you as a way to see how difficult it is to figure out how to contribute! The site is meant to appeal to Citizen Scientists as well as more advanced mappers.
last Thursday at 2:16PM   
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dardidit
I sent you an email. thanks! Claire
last Thursday at 2:36PM   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens bookmarked an ideabook

How to Install a Green Roof

Covering a roof with low-maintenance plants has benefits beyond just beauty. Get the details here Full Story
     Comment   August 13, 2014
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Andrea Frank
Norberry- Are you really adding soil every year? or I guess a better question is are you needing nutrients or substrate? As for clover- I'd say dig it out if you can. Or try the recipe making the rounds of 1cup vinegar+ 2 tablespoons Epson salt+ 1/4 teaspoon Dawn dish soap and spray it on. It works well in dry warm weather- you know- those 2 days in July :).
June 10, 2014 at 10:49PM   
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Andrea Frank
@Peggy Tupper Good Luck with that.
June 10, 2014 at 10:53PM   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens bookmarked an ideabook

Design Workshop: Give Me an ‘H’

Look to modern versions of an H-shaped medieval floor plan for more privacy and natural light Full Story
     Comment   August 13, 2014
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jillybeansisme
So I'm guessing my house is more "U" shaped since the back is straight across and the front is a small inside of the "U" for a covered area. I actually thought of it as a sort of Sudoku square, because it is a square divided into 9 portions. Front to back left side is guest bedroom, laundry/craft room, kitchen. Middle is the inside "U" porch & entry, living room, playroom. Right side is 2nd bedroom, bathrooms & closets, Master Suite. There are, just as described in the "H" house, two small hallways on either side of the central living/play rooms, which provide privacy and seclusion from the public areas.

I think one of the biggest differences is that in my house I can move in a circular pattern and not have to get back to the "central bridge" between the legs. Back when H homes were first built, it seems like it was a necessary pattern for those cross breezes/ventilation whereas in modern day, convenience is more important at least to me. I want to be able to age gracefully in my home before I give it to my daughter. Now that energy costs are so expensive, I suspect my home will be much less expensive that a similar square footage in an H home.

All those extra corners on the H house also usually add to building expense, but again, this article was about design not cost.

The article was definitely an interesting read.
August 16, 2014 at 4:58PM   
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litojr
nice layout, you can think alot of combination design.
August 17, 2014 at 8:37PM   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens commented on an ideabook

How to Find the Right Plants for Your Garden

Break free from choosing plants by cold-hardiness zones for a beautiful landscape that thrives year-round Full Story
     Comment   August 13, 2014
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
It is! :) Wonderful!
August 13, 2014 at 9:03AM   
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rh2os
Awesome! Thank you, thank you!! I appreciate it!!!
August 13, 2014 at 9:11AM   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens now has a photo featured in an ideabook

Réalisez vous-même un jardin de rocaille

Voici un éventail de trucs et astuces pour un jardin de rocaille réussi Full Story
     Comment   August 13, 2014
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens commented on an ideabook

Great Design Plant: Meadow Blazingstar (Liatris Ligulistylis)

Make fast friends with the monarch butterflies and get a color show too with this adaptable U.S. Midwest native Full Story
     Comment   August 10, 2014
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
Cottage -- Kids today will see 40% less butterflies than their parents did 40 years ago. For birds and mammals that number is nearly 30%. Habitat loss by conversion to roads and houses and ag fields, even more toxic chemicals in our environment, climate change.... it's all going to radically shift and reduce species. 30% of all plant species could be gone by 2058. The last three years for me have seen a major shift downward in insect numbers and diversity.
August 10, 2014 at 7:48AM     
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
I'm not a glyphosate fan, but we need to slow the horse down here. It doesn't last long in the environment, a plus -- the problem really comes in with repeated application where it builds up in the soil and water and thus in the plants (talking ag fields here). The other major problem with any chemical application is most people, pros and not, have no idea how to apply -- how much, what time of day, etc. I think prepping a large field for prairie seeding by using glyphosate is ok, as the means may justify the ends. Regular homeowners apply many times more fertilizer to their lawns than farmers do on their fields, and we should talk about how destructive fertilizer production is (water use, greenhouse gas emissions) and what it does when it slides off lawns in a heavy rain and finds waterways.
August 10, 2014 at 3:42PM     
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
Here's a piece I wrote just this week on raising monarchs, and how I sort of think losing them might wake us to change (our Silent Spring). http://nativeplantwildlifegarden.com/monarchs-with-a-vengeance/
August 10, 2014 at 3:43PM     
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
Yes, I'm well aware of the many pros and cons of this chemical. But it is a proven conservation tool in restoring prairie -- I am on the board of such an organization. I'm not saying I like it, but it's better than plowing to remove unwanted unwanted vegetation (in a lot of cases, not all). It's a grey area. It really is. And is just a small surface issue reflecting much larger, deeper issues relevant to our culture and destruction of the planet.
August 10, 2014 at 4:32PM     
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chookchook2
The flutterbys thank you.
August 11, 2014 at 7:38PM   
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eclecticedwardian
Thanks for another good article! And thank you for the comments about fertilizers--people really do not know what havoc (death and destruction) they cause in the watershed. They have learned perhaps that other chemicals are "bad", but haven't added broadcast fertilizer to that list--and as you say, in many ways it is worse, certainly in sheer volume of application.
August 12, 2014 at 12:19PM     
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens commented on an ideabook

Great Design Plant: Butterfly Milkweed, a Beacon in the Prairie

Vivacious orange flowers for you, nectar for the butterflies and bees. Asclepias tuberosa is worth planting for more reasons than one Full Story
     Comment   August 7, 2014
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
Springmom -- I get lots of aphids toward the end of summer here in Nebraska, but it's only a few days until the lady bugs come to devour them. Do you have lady bugs around?
August 7, 2014 at 3:44PM     
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springmom
We only have a few lady bugs here, not nearly enough to kill the tons of aphids on my plants unfortunately.
August 12, 2014 at 10:47AM   
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wellmama
I typically like to let the bugs go knowing that it's all part of the circle of life, but... my milkweed have been saturated in aphids for the past month (all along the stems, under the leaves, on the seed pods). So when I watered last, I took the hose to the aphids as well, and that seemed to do the trick. I did first check to make sure I wasn't hosing down any caterpillar larva or ladybug eggs. I still feel a little guilty about it but much better than a chemical alternative I like to tell myself.
August 14, 2014 at 10:10AM   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens bookmarked an ideabook

Bring on the Garden Bling With Artful Stainless Steel

Set stainless free of the kitchen, using it to brighten and decorate any garden in an unexpected way Full Story
     Comment   August 6, 2014
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Diamond Spas
Stainless Steel blends in beautifully with the natural hard and soft scapes.
August 19, 2014 at 1:06PM   
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Nancee McAloon
Beautiful, simplistic and tempting!!!
August 19, 2014 at 1:12PM   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens bookmarked an ideabook

Houzz Tour: Passive House Principles, Active Benefits in Portland

Lower energy bills and consistent temperatures are just two of the advantages of this architect’s newly built home Full Story
     Comment   August 2, 2014
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Sheila Russell Thurber
I am very surprised at myself because I actually love this house! It is gorgeous, but wonder if it would be a good design for the severe cold weather we get in Northern Maine?
August 23, 2014 at 2:18PM   
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kdohermann
How much is that doggy in the window? Arf! Arf! Does anyone else see the cutie in the first pic?
August 24, 2014 at 8:16AM   
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens published an ideabook

Great Design Plant: Canadian Milkvetch Draws Bees and Birds

Its seedpods have visual appeal, but winged creatures are lured to Astralagus canadensis for more than its looks Full Story
     Comment   August 2, 2014
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Nani Sa
lovely.thanks.
August 3, 2014 at 8:23AM   
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barbadosbybus
I really enjoy all of Benjamin Vogt's pieces on native plant gardening. May I add that a lot of native insects don't recognize non-native plants as food, so it's important to keep some native plants in our gardens for insects to eat, because they then become food for birds, and in this way we will be doing our bit to sustain biodiversity!
August 4, 2014 at 1:28PM   
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Review by camiller70:

When I first started thinking about using native plants it was really just because I wanted to attract more butterflies to my garden. As with anything on the in...
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Review by Donna Kinseth:

After having spent a few very discouraging years of drought and flooding, our backyard was nothing but weeds. Wanting more, we attended a class at Southeast Co...
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