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Mid-sized mountain style l-shaped medium tone wood floor kitchen photo in San Francisco with a farmhouse sink, gray cabinets, marble countertops, stainless steel appliances and window backsplash
Barbra Bright Design
Barbra Bright DesignKitchen & Bath Designers
Average rating: 5 out of 5 stars35 Reviews
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Sonoma Kitchen

Rustic Kitchen, San Francisco

The mixture of grey green cabinets with the distressed wood floors and ceilings, gives this farmhouse kitchen a feeling of warmth. Cabinets: Brookhaven and the color is Green Stone Benjamin Moore paint color: There's not an exact match for Green Stone, but Gettysburg Grey, HC 107 is close. Sink: Krauss, model KHF200-30, stainless steel Faucet: Kraus, modelKPF-1602 Hardware: Restoration hardware, Dakota cup and Dakota round knob. The finish was either the chestnut or iron. Windows: Bloomberg is the manufacturer the hardware is from Restoration hardware--Dakota cup and Dakota round knob. The finish was either the chestnut or iron. Floors: European Oak that is wired brushed. The company is Provenza, Pompeii collection and the color is Amiata. Distressed wood: The wood is cedar that's been treated to look distressed! My client is brilliant , so he did some googling (is that a word?) and came across several sites that had a recipe to do just that. He put a steel wool pad into a jar of vinegar and let it sit for a bit. In another jar, he mixed black tea with water. Brush the tea on first and let it dry. Then brush on the steel wool/vinegar (don't forget to strain the wool). Voila, the wood turns dark. Andrew McKinney Photography