Janet Paik
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013.Rose Pruning Tips
 

013.Rose Pruning Tips

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What Houzz contributors are saying:

Annie Thornton added this to Expert Pruning Secrets for Exquisite Roses
Here Chuang has pruned 1/4 inch above a thick, healthy and outward-growing cane. The cut is angled out in the direction of growth and will promote an open, rounded plant.Make the cut. Rosarians may disagree on how much to prune, when to prune and what to prune, but they unanimously agree that the cut itself is important in promoting rose health.Cut 1/4 inch above an outward-facing bud eye. Locate an outward-facing bud eye on a thick, healthy cane. A bud eye occurs just above the junction of a leaf (Chuang suggests five-leaflet leaves) and the cane — or at a dormant eye. The dormant eye is where a leaf used to be and resembles a swelling band. Leaving the leaves on the bush until the end of pruning makes it easier to identify where to cut. The cut signals the bush to send water and nutrients to that part of the bush. New growth will emerge from the bud eye in the direction of the cut.Cut at a 45-degree angle with the direction of leaf growth, away from the bud eye. This is the direction in which the new growth will emerge, so you will be promoting an open and outward-facing shrub. The angle also directs sap and water away from the bud eye, and naturally seals the cut. (Some rosarians suggest sealing cuts wider than a pencil with a sealant like Elmer’s Glue to prevent borers.)

What Houzzers are commenting on:

Christine Kamm added this to christine_kamm's Ideas
November 4, 2014
Roses maintained tips
margielynnj added this to margielynnj's Ideas
August 24, 2014
Cut 1/4 inch above an outward-facing bud eye. Locate an outward-facing bud eye on a thick, healthy cane. A bud eye occurs just above the junction of a leaf (Chuang suggests five-leaflet leaves) and the cane — or at a dormant eye. The dormant eye is where a leaf used to be and resembles a swelling band. Leaving the leaves on the bush until the end of pruning makes it easier to identify where to cut. The cut signals the bush to send water and nutrients to that part of the bush. New growth will emerge from the bud eye in the direction of the cut. Cut at a 45-degree angle with the direction of leaf growth, away from the bud eye. This is the direction in which the new growth will emerge, so you will be promoting an open and outward-facing shrub. The angle also directs sap and water away from the bud eye, and naturally seals the cut. (Some rosarians suggest sealing cuts wider than a pencil with a sealant like Elmer’s Glue to prevent borers.)
cdrika88 added this to cdrika88's Ideas
May 21, 2014
Pruning techniques
rlensi added this to rlensi's ideas
January 27, 2014
Rose pruning
jolantakalathas added this to jolantakalathas's ideas
January 23, 2014
make the cut
pokoch added this to Landscape Ideas
January 21, 2014
Here Chuang has pruned 1/4 inch above a thick, healthy and outward-growing cane. The cut is angled out in the direction of growth and will promote an open, rounded plant. Make the cut. Rosarians may disagree on how much to prune, when to prune and what to prune, but they unanimously agree that the cut itself is important in promoting rose health. •Cut 1/4 inch above an outward-facing bud eye. Locate an outward-facing bud eye on a thick, healthy cane. A bud eye occurs just above the junction of a leaf (Chuang suggests five-leaflet leaves) and the cane — or at a dormant eye. The dormant eye is where a leaf used to be and resembles a swelling band. Leaving the leaves on the bush until the end of pruning makes it easier to identify where to cut. The cut signals the bush to send water and nutrients to that part of the bush. New growth will emerge from the bud eye in the direction of the cut. •Cut at a 45-degree angle with the direction of leaf growth, away from the bud eye. This is the direction in which the new growth will emerge, so you will be promoting an open and outward-facing shrub. The angle also directs sap and water away from the bud eye, and naturally seals the cut. What to Do After Pruning Spray. Chuang says two sprays following pruning are key to a healthy plant over winter and into spring. Spray the canes heavily all the way to the ground and even the surrounding ground. Spray from the top down and let the spray blanket the shrub. • Apply a dormancy spray when you will have at least three days without rain and at least 24 hours without freezing temperatures. Dormancy oil is a horticultural oil that smothers pest eggs that may reside on last year’s leaves, canes and the surrounding dirt. Follow the directions on the package. While it’s not necessary to spray immediately after pruning, the sooner you do, the sooner you will eliminate possible pests. • One week later, apply a mixture of dormancy oil and sulfur. The sulfur will smother fungus spores. Fertilize one month later. Chuang places a ring of a fertilizer blend around the base of each bush, consisting of: • Alfalfa pellets • 3/4 cup slow-release fertilizer • 4 to 5 cups chicken manure Water well after fertilizing.
kathie34 added this to ideabook no. 2
January 21, 2014
Secret to Pruning roses well
ellen17 added this to ellen17's Favorites
January 20, 2014
rose info
birdiee added this to my garden
January 19, 2014
How to prune a rose brush.
Michelle added this to mmrosenbaum's Ideas
January 19, 2014
rose pruning info
pietrina123 added this to pietrina123's ideas
January 19, 2014
HOW TO TRIM ROSES
andy8877 added this to andy8877's ideas
January 19, 2014
How to prune rose
breedt99 added this to breedt99's ideas
January 19, 2014
Rose Pruning
Cindy Littlejohn added this to Gardening
January 19, 2014
Time to prune the roses
argue added this to Landscape
January 16, 2014
Pruning roses
Bonnie D Loubier's Landscape Design added this to Prunning roses
December 16, 2013
very detailed
spruill added this to spruill's Ideas
October 27, 2013
Pruning
tpchiro101 added this to gardening tips and ideas
June 23, 2013
How to prune Rose bush
Yolanda Munoz added this to yolanda_munoz's ideas
June 5, 2013
Prune roses
Sharon Bayley added this to sharon_bayley's ideas
May 20, 2013
proper rose pruning
jncastillo173 added this to jnc ideas
May 1, 2013
Here Chuang has pruned 1/4 inch above a thick, healthy and outward-growing cane. The cut is angled out in the direction of growth and will promote an open, rounded plant. Make the cut. Rosarians may disagree on how much to prune, when to prune and what to prune, but they unanimously agree that the cut itself is important in promoting rose health. •Cut 1/4 inch above an outward-facing bud eye. Locate an outward-facing bud eye on a thick, healthy cane. A bud eye occurs just above the junction of a leaf (Chuang suggests five-leaflet leaves) and the cane — or at a dormant eye. The dormant eye is where a leaf used to be and resembles a swelling band. Leaving the leaves on the bush until the end of pruning makes it easier to identify where to cut. The cut signals the bush to send water and nutrients to that part of the bush. New growth will emerge from the bud eye in the direction of the cut. •Cut at a 45-degree angle with the direction of leaf growth, away from the bud eye. This is the direction in which the new growth will emerge, so you will be promoting an open and outward-facing shrub. The angle also directs sap and water away from the bud eye, and naturally seals the cut. (Some rosarians suggest sealing cuts wider than a pencil with a sealant like Elmer’s Glue to prevent borers.)
birdiee added this to birdiee's ideas
March 25, 2013
How it was cut for a healthy rounded bush.
esme2288 added this to GARDEN
March 24, 2013
TREAT TOOLS WITH ALCOHOL! Here Chuang has pruned 1/4 inch above a thick, healthy and outward-growing cane. The cut is angled out in the direction of growth and will promote an open, rounded plant. Make the cut. Rosarians may disagree on how much to prune, when to prune and what to prune, but they unanimously agree that the cut itself is important in promoting rose health. Cut 1/4 inch above an outward-facing bud eye. Locate an outward-facing bud eye on a thick, healthy cane. A bud eye occurs just above the junction of a leaf (Chuang suggests five-leaflet leaves) and the cane — or at a dormant eye. The dormant eye is where a leaf used to be and resembles a swelling band. Leaving the leaves on the bush until the end of pruning makes it easier to identify where to cut. The cut signals the bush to send water and nutrients to that part of the bush. New growth will emerge from the bud eye in the direction of the cut. Cut at a 45-degree angle with the direction of leaf growth, away from the bud eye. This is the direction in which the new growth will emerge, so you will be promoting an open and outward-facing shrub. The angle also directs sap and water away from the bud eye, and naturally seals the cut. (Some rosarians suggest sealing cuts wider than a pencil with a sealant like Elmer’s Glue to prevent borers.)
pamadona added this to Pruning
March 21, 2013
Rose Bush Pruning
esommers added this to esommers's ideas
March 20, 2013
pruning for roses
mpshrink added this to garden/flowers
March 20, 2013
pruning roses
janik56 added this to PODAR
March 20, 2013
SE PODO 1/4 " ARRIBA THE UN TALLO GRUESO Y SANO. HACIENDO EL CORTE EN ANGULO PARA AFUERA , HACE QUE LA PLANTA TOME FORMA REDONDA.
gilloulee added this to gilloulee's ideas
February 28, 2013
garden
da3125 added this to da3125's ideas
February 27, 2013
pruning roses
ocean77 added this to ocean77's ideas
February 27, 2013
roses3
zippitydoodaday added this to Garden
February 24, 2013
Here Chuang has pruned 1/4 inch above a thick, healthy and outward-growing cane. The cut is angled out in the direction of growth and will promote an open, rounded plant. Make the cut. Rosarians may disagree on how much to prune, when to prune and what to prune, but they unanimously agree that the cut itself is important in promoting rose health. Cut 1/4 inch above an outward-facing bud eye. Locate an outward-facing bud eye on a thick, healthy cane. A bud eye occurs just above the junction of a leaf (Chuang suggests five-leaflet leaves) and the cane — or at a dormant eye. The dormant eye is where a leaf used to be and resembles a swelling band. Leaving the leaves on the bush until the end of pruning makes it easier to identify where to cut. The cut signals the bush to send water and nutrients to that part of the bush. New growth will emerge from the bud eye in the direction of the cut. Cut at a 45-degree angle with the direction of leaf growth, away from the bud eye. This is the direction in which the new growth will emerge, so you will be promoting an open and outward-facing shrub. The angle also directs sap and water away from the bud eye, and naturally seals the cut. (Some rosarians suggest sealing cuts wider than a pencil with a sealant like Elmer’s Glue to prevent borers.)
lyvigil added this to how to
February 2, 2013
Here Chuang has pruned 1/4 inch above a thick, healthy and outward-growing cane. The cut is angled out in the direction of growth and will promote an open, rounded plant. Make the cut. Rosarians may disagree on how much to prune, when to prune and what to prune, but they unanimously agree that the cut itself is important in promoting rose health. •Cut 1/4 inch above an outward-facing bud eye. Locate an outward-facing bud eye on a thick, healthy cane. A bud eye occurs just above the junction of a leaf (Chuang suggests five-leaflet leaves) and the cane — or at a dormant eye. The dormant eye is where a leaf used to be and resembles a swelling band. Leaving the leaves on the bush until the end of pruning makes it easier to identify where to cut. The cut signals the bush to send water and nutrients to that part of the bush. New growth will emerge from the bud eye in the direction of the cut. •Cut at a 45-degree angle with the direction of leaf growth, away from the bud eye. This is the direction in which the new growth will emerge, so you will be promoting an open and outward-facing shrub. The angle also directs sap and water away from the bud eye, and naturally seals the cut. (Some rosarians suggest sealing cuts wider than a pencil with a sealant like Elmer’s Glue to prevent borers.)
gardnin_gal added this to gardnin_gal's ideas
January 30, 2013
Pruning cuts.
jm1005 added this to Garden
January 29, 2013
Cut 1/4 inch above an outward-facing bud eye. Locate an outward-facing bud eye on a thick, healthy cane. A bud eye occurs just above the junction of a leaf (Chuang suggests five-leaflet leaves) and the cane — or at a dormant eye. The dormant eye is where a leaf used to be and resembles a swelling band. Leaving the leaves on the bush until the end of pruning makes it easier to identify where to cut. The cut signals the bush to send water and nutrients to that part of the bush. New growth will emerge from the bud eye in the direction of the cut.
momsinger added this to momsinger's Favorites
January 29, 2013
Yellow roses
debsinca57 added this to debsinca57's ideas
January 28, 2013
Roses
Diana Wilson added this to Outside
January 28, 2013
pruning roses
Datcu Dorina added this to datcu_dorina's ideas
January 28, 2013
roses
homeiademarco added this to homeiademarco's ideas
January 28, 2013
Garden tips
Anna Meaney added this to annameaney's ideas
January 27, 2013
pruining
angelamn added this to angelamn's ideas
January 27, 2013
Roses
gdailey added this to gdailey's ideas
January 27, 2013
pruning roses
stelladupree added this to stelladupree's ideas
January 27, 2013
rose pruning
agueda added this to agueda's Favorites
January 27, 2013
Como podar rosas
amyvogt added this to amyvogt's ideas
January 27, 2013
rose pruning
htl3 added this to How To
January 27, 2013
HOW TO PRUNE............
tanyacopeland added this to Roses
January 27, 2013
pruning tips
lpapke added this to gardening
January 27, 2013
Cut pic
joidevivre29 added this to Gardening
January 27, 2013
The correct way to prune a rose
joanne added this to Gardening
January 27, 2013
Pruning roses
CATHY WENTZ DESIGNS added this to butterflycw's ideas
January 27, 2013
PRUNING ROSES
dschwindt added this to Gardening
January 27, 2013
pruning roses
yaya11142 added this to yaya11142's ideas
January 27, 2013
Roses, Done Right -- Indoor Vases
dicart added this to Landscape
January 27, 2013
Pruning Roses
teslik added this to teslik's Favorites
January 27, 2013
how to prune
angiesays added this to Angie's Idea Book
January 25, 2013
Rose pruning
Rebecca Hillenbrand added this to rebecca_hillenbrand's ideas
January 24, 2013
Pruning roses
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