Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders


Business Description
Brickwood Builders, Inc. is a full service design/build remodeling contractor who brings exceptional quality and service to residential renovation throughout Greensboro and the surrounding Piedmont Triad area. Our projects range from whole house remodels, home additions, kitchens and baths and outdoor living spaces.

Certification and Awards
Certified Aging in Place Specialist
Certified Graduate Remodeler
Location:
Greensboro, NC US 
Type:
 
Address:
135A Montlieu Avenue
Greensboro, NC 27409 
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
we have ours custom made by a cabinet maker
on Sunday at 5:33pm   
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TMK Remodeling
26-30 is pretty large. I recently installed this one from Ronbow cabinets. Its part of their Rebecca line. I think the size is 21x32". Here is a link to their web site:http://www.ronbow.com/vanity/wall-hung/rebecca-23
on Sunday at 6:20pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Interview several remodelers and select one of them.
on Sunday at 5:29pm     
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ispoildogs
I suggest you look for a company who specializes in windows. Not a manufacturer, but an installer who carries several different brands and can explain the differences to you. They will have samples they can bring to your home.
on Sunday at 7:29pm     
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leeweber
There are window dealers that carry many brands at varying price points and can describe pros and cons of each.
Yesterday at 5:08am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
We just are not thrilled with Anderson. We installed them in a sunroom and could not get the windows and transoms with comparable jambs and it took days to get everything to work out.
on Sunday at 5:24pm   
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battard13
Andersen makes a lot of different windows. The Renewal product is know to be a very high quality and very nice looking product. Marvin is a good company as well but in my opinion and experience the 400 series windows are excellent choices as well.
on Sunday at 5:29pm   
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TMK Remodeling
Marvin is the top of the line in both product and price. Andersen is mid to upper line with product and price.
on Sunday at 6:22pm   
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kahenson
I never heard of Haride Board, I have heard of Hardieplank.
If you are asking about Hardieplank or siding you can paint it whatever color your heart desires!
on Sunday at 4:36pm      Thanked by wallybearmom
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
you can get Hardie in just primed and paint it whatever color you wish.
on Sunday at 5:16pm        Thanked by wallybearmom
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
I understand your issue. At this point it may not be possible to move the switch for various reasons - location of studs in the wall, no extra wire in the wall in order to move the box, etc. The location of studs in the wall may have dictated the location of the box and switch to begin with. I would come up with a tile design that has one or two rows of tile and then some type of pencil liner or decorative piece. I would leave it low like that on the affected wall so it should be below the switch. On the wall with the range, I would do the same design but then I would tile above the pencil (or accent) with the same tile up as high as you want.
on Sunday at 9:54am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders

Hope this works. I am trying to post Houzz photo of what I was trying to describe. Not sure exactly how to do it on a tablet.
on Sunday at 1:53pm   
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ptreckel
I agree that you must talk with your electrician about this. I had a similar problem. The electrician installed the outlets in my backsplash at different heights than my wall switches. The lines were totally off and it was a nightmare for tiling! Nothing lined up. I just called the electrician to return and "fix it!" He wasn't happy, but it was my money. And I was assertive. Trust me, he changed it. If this bothers you, it should be resolved. And it can be resolved. If not, it will ALWAYS bother you! Trust me....I have experience with that, too!
15 hours ago     
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Wild Infusion
Like I was saying I would get stainless or coloured power points. These you will have to pay for but they are minimal as in about $15 each then you will not see them half as much.
9 hours ago   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Whoever did the tile design is responsible for communicating to the contractor what is desired. It is generally done with a hand created sketch noting size and location of everything. Assuming is not a substitute for communicating.
on Sunday at 8:13am      Thanked by mollyladd
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
If this is a tub/shower then I agree that to attempt to remove the tile would compromise the waterproofing. It would be a last resort and the fix would be to rip out to the studs and build back properly. Would be very expensive.
on Sunday at 1:38pm        Thanked by mollyladd
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mollyladd
Thanks to all of you for taking the time to respond to me...........I feel like the biggest fool in the world, I have way bigger problems than the tile pattern! You were so right Kivi, turns out he didn't even use cementboard on one of the walls and no waterproofing anywhere, there are so many things wrong it would take me all night to list them.
I fired him this morning and feel like this person was very deceptive. My only bathroom is unusable and I'm just going to have to find someone else as soon as possible.
You all have been very kind to me and I appreciate all the comments and concern!
8 hours ago   
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Kivi
Molly, clearly you did the tight thing by firing him. Good for you! On the bright side, this is the time to deal with all the things that were done wrong.... before any water leaking/ damage starts. Visit some of your local tile shops, or call a local design person ( if you want some help with the overall design, and possibly oversight of the new installation). Those folks will generally know who the really good tile installers are in your area.
I know it is very disheartening to feel that you have been deceived like this. I feel for you.
You may already realize this but your current shower will need to be ripped out down to the studs. Hopefully the shower plumbing was all done properly and can be reused. Since we don't know what you used for a shower base...that may or may not need to be taken out also.
5 hours ago   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Too many variables to even guess. Go ahead and start talking to several professional remodelers and see what they say. in the meantime, you can look at the Cost vs Value report for your city, but it is only a general idea.
on Sunday at 11:09am   
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Sophie Wheeler
It will probably almost as much as the home costs to buy. Lots of red tape, IF the setbacks will even allow the expansion. http://www.remodeling.hw.net/cost-vs-value/2014/new-england/boston-ma/
on Sunday at 11:29am   
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TMK Remodeling
Valerie,

If you want to add on, then get a plot plan, trace out the size of the addition using a scaled ruler, take it down to the local building department and ask for a zoning review. They will be able to guide you on what is permissible for adding on. If you decide to build it, then you will need to hire a civil engineer to draw up a survey and an architect who will draw up schematics and construction drawings. We can generally produce a budget price off a set of schematics.

You may want to consider raising the roof and adding another story on the existing 800 SF footprint rather than trying to expand outwards if the zoning prevents it.

I work in MA. Please contact me if you want me to take a look at the project.
on Sunday at 11:59am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders commented on a discussion
   Comment   last Saturday
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Sophie Wheeler
I'm assuming that you already have the lot, as the plans should be designed for the lot. Your architect will help you to sort through bids from the specs that he developed to select your builder. If you chose the full service option from him, that is.
last Saturday at 4:10pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
If you already have your plans, then you may want to go to your local homebuilder's associate website and look at various builder profiles. If you can't find the local homebuilder's association website, you can go to NAHB.org and narrow it down to your location. Angie's List can also be another source of information or local Parade of Homes or other functions where you can see the work of various builders. Interview several builders and get several bids. It will take a lot of work to understand the various bids. Have discussions until you understand what each is providing - there will be differences.

Make sure you know going in what your budget is and don't be afraid to tell people. We see plans all the time that cannot be built for anywhere near the homeowners budget - better to find that out in the beginning. Plan designers and architects are notorious for developing plans that have all the features someone wants, but has no correlation to their budget (which may never have even been discussed). If you need to alter your plans to fit a budget, the various contractors that you ask to bid the project can assist you in understanding what can be done.
last Saturday at 4:28pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
We commonly run into the problem of a potential customer's budget being insufficient to accomplish what they want to do - whether it is new construction or remodeling (which is our primary business). Many things can cause it and realistically it is likely a combination of things. Homeowners may set a budget that they are comfortable with, but select plans based on what they want and not based on what the budget will build. Some contractors provide more services and build to a higher level of quality and their pricing will be higher than others. Some contractors have an office, insurance, staffing, etc. that means they have a higher fixed cost to cover than someone working out of the bonus room over their garage. It can be due to various things that might have nothing to do with how much or how little the contractor is making on the project. Before you dismiss your friend, I would sit down and ask what he/she believes is driving up the cost of the project and what it would take to get to $X cost and why.

Unless a contractor is a design/build firm, generally the business model is to develop a cost for the project using allowances for all items that the owners get to select. The owners are then given the names of suppliers to visit to make their selections and these suppliers write up the information and generally send it back to the contractor - they may or may not copy the owners on the correspondence. So this is pretty normal unless you are hiring a design/build firm. If you do go with a design/build firm, then the costs are higher as they are taking their time to go with you to select everything and they are providing guidance and advice. Some design/build firms have interior designers on staff for this. So I would say that the fact you are going out to make your selections is not unusual at all if working with a standard residential contractor.

The other thing you mentioned is that the contractor will be taking a mark up even if you supply something. Having been doing this for a lot of years, we have found that we can spend more time on an item that is supplied by a homeowner than if it were purchased through us and our suppliers. Missing parts, order incomplete, doesn't fit, light is incompatible with dimmers, we're asked to go pick up items for them because they don't have a truck, etc. It can be a long list. What we have also found is that invariably the consumer asks us if they bought the right thing, is this going to work, etc. - and if we glance at it and say yes we think so, all of a sudden we own it if it doesn't work and there is a problem. In their eyes we blessed it and approved it so it is our fault. After years of this, a contractor learns to go ahead and charge because time is going to be spent on it (best case) and you may end up buying it or replacing it (worst case). Maybe that is a jaded view, but so far we have never had one case where things like this didn't happen if we allowed the customer to provide products or do some of the work themselves.

Not knowing the full terms of the contract it is hard to address the specifics, but it would appear that 8% would be very low. One would expect to see about 20% or so on a new build.

Having said all this, I believe that it is informative and helpful for consumers to interview 2-3 contractors to understand the differences in process and pricing. I can tell you without ever seeing them that the quotes/bids will be all over the board and you will most likely see wide ranges. That's when you have to roll up your sleeves, meet with each and really understand what you are getting. You do not get the same thing for less money and there is no way to know what is left out of one bid vs another without a lot of work. There are no customary forms and no standards regarding how quotes are done and it is hard to get down to the differences. It is very confusing and not a slam dunk. In the end, you get as much information as you can and go with someone you trust and that makes you feel good about the process.

Good luck to you. It is always stressful, but should be fun as well.
last Saturday at 4:17pm     
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Sophie Wheeler
8% is absurdly low anywhere. Double that, and you'd still be on the low sde for someone truly competent and in demand. Your friend is trying to do you a favor, and like a lot of people that mix business with friendship, it will probaly cost him both relaionships.

A 4000 square foot home isn't going to be 400K anywhere unless it's a used home. New construction costs more than existing for the priviledge of having things the way you want them. You want to be the boss, you pay the costs.

Look into buying existing if you priced yourself out of your market with your plans.
last Saturday at 4:23pm     
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chookchook2
Lag19905, put this under design dilemma. Get 2more quotes on your job.
last Saturday at 7:34pm     
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
We use both and like both. If the budget allows, we generally go with Pella as we get great local service from them. The Architect Series is a nice door.
last Saturday at 3:46pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
I would go for an interior designer to help you put the finishing touches on and make it your space.
last Saturday at 3:45pm      Thanked by rla_newyork
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Sabrina Alfin Interiors, Inc.
Will any of the work be structural in nature, I.e. Moving or otherwise adjusting load-bearing walls? If not, working with an interior designer will probably be your best bet. S/he will be more likely to work worth you on finishing details, too, including furnishings, window treatments, etc.
last Saturday at 5:25pm        Thanked by rla_newyork
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
If you wish to have pendants over the island, then I would consider using recessed pin lights in the dining area. I don't care for hanging lights in close spaces that clutter up the space visually. With three pendants, I would use something small 6" - 8". I personally would use two larger pendants spaced over the island.
last Saturday at 8:47am     
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
There are a lot of decisions to make. Can be overwhelming. What we have done lately is actually put LED recessed pin lights (they are much smaller than aa standard recessed) over the dining room table and then used a combination of wall washers and other recessed throughout the room. Works best with a rectangular table. Go above and select kitchens. Then select your style (such as traditional). Then put islands in the Houzz search bar. Focus on the lighting over islands. Some beautiful inspiration photos.
last Saturday at 11:51am   
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ddiannef72
Thanks Deborah, you're so right, this building process has been a bit overwhelming. I honestly have never heard of LED recessed pin lights, and my table just happens to be rectangular. Great advice.
last Saturday at 12:43pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
I don't have a good picture to show you. This one shows two of the three pin lights over the dining table and a couple of the wall washers to highlight artwork around the room. Pin lights are just smaller recessed lights that have a small opening and very concentrated light.
last Saturday at 1:42pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
You can have all the doors changed out to a simple shaker door.
last Saturday at 10:25am   
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Chandra McWilliams
I love the white cabinets with the teal island!
last Saturday at 4:00pm   
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Thos. Baker
Your kitchen is certainly spacious enough for an island! Perhaps after you've painted the kitchen white and finished restoring the floors, you can find a little extra in the budget for an unfinished island and paint it teal. Or, you could also find a second hand island, convert a work bench or restore an interesting piece of furniture that could serve as a unique island.

Christi, on behalf of Thos. Baker
on Sunday at 3:10am     
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Aggie dba Aggie Designs
I would keep the star (it is the cutest thing ever) for the back entry/ mudroom or Master Bath, and get something much more grand for the foyer...

[houzz=
]
last Saturday at 10:14am        Thanked by Katherine Vecchio_Stanislawski
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Personal preference. You can go up to the search bar and put in stained doors with painted trim and see lots of examples. You can also search stained woodwork and see examples of that as well.

last Saturday at 10:17am   
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studio10001
last Saturday at 10:18am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Many great landscaping photos here on Houzz with retaining walls. Search through Exterior walls to find something you like.
last Saturday at 8:41am      Thanked by mautry
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mautry
Back of house with rock wall behind it
last Saturday at 5:20pm     
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Jenifer K-AlterEgo
Lovely home. As for the rock wall, I would say you have three terraces to landscape for a beautiful view. If you want to hide the upper wall completely, fill in the area in front with tall flowering shrubs and evergreens. You can do the same with the lower "wall" and/or try some trailing perennials like ivy. Do something fun, like planting each level for a different season of color. At the very top, it would be great to plant trees and shrubs that would blaze with fall colors against that woodsy background. I would avoid any plans that required a lot of seasonal maintenance or mowing on that high terrace though.
last Saturday at 6:06pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Go to the tile store that sold you the products and ask if a grout haze remover can be used on these products. If so, then most stores sell a product for removal of the haze.
last Saturday at 8:05am        Thanked by lesliebattrick
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Patricia Colwell
Sorry the tub will have to move to do the job properly and the toilet also and the baseboards you might get away with just moving the tub around as you work and not have to take completly out of the room
last Saturday at 6:52am        Thanked by mjhendry
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Angel18432
Tery, so are you saying you would have to go thru the shower to get to the tub?
Totally not an option. When it comes to selling the home, it would be a big negative.
So my vote is for the corner shower.
last Saturday at 7:55am   
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teryandaugusto
Interesting - I was thinking more if I were in the tub, isn't it nice to be able to step directly into the shower and rinse?
last Saturday at 9:36am   
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sandkshouse
They can go just about any where. Our great room is open to our kitchen. The TV is over the fireplace in the great room, and the components are in a cabinet that opens in towards the kitchen. You'll need a Blu-ray player rather than a standard DVD player because the Blu-ray connects via an HDMI cable which can sustain a longer run than the old RCA type cables. You can then add, relatively inexpensively, an IR repeater system for the remote control of the devices. Check out parts-express.com for a good selection of IR repeater devices. Let me know if there are more specific questions.
last Saturday at 6:26am        Thanked by debramalloy
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Madden, Slick & Bontempo, Inc
I am reposting it. I'm not sure why you can't see it though - it looks like it's part of the thread. If you wanted to keep the two shallow pantries, you could do mirrored doors instead, maybe with a sconce above each? . That would look pretty nice in the dining room. Can you do a rough floorplan?
last Saturday at 6:53am     
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Madden, Slick & Bontempo, Inc
Another example which would close off the backdoor as suggested earlier and open up the kitchen into the living room.
Also a very pretty small kitchen.
Classic City Kitchen 1
Classic City Kitchen 2
last Saturday at 7:21am     
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
We have seen the luxury vinyl planks and are very interested in them, but have not installed them yet. Our flooring supplier is very high on them. We do have a laminate floor installed in our bonus room and it has been there for about 10 years now. I do not like the way it cleans up and would not want it in a high traffic area such as a kitchen. When I damp mop, it leaves water marks on the surface that show. The only way I have found to clean it and it look nice is to mop it in small areas and then get down with a towel and dry the area before moving on. Too much maintenance for me. I would say that whatever you buy, look for a quality product and not the cheapest thing around from HD or Lowes. In the long run, it will be more cost effective.
last Thursday at 8:38am     
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
I would recommend doing a lot of research about lumber liquidators before you purchase anything through them. Lots of unhappy people.
last Thursday at 2:02pm     
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
The experiences we know of relate to products that are seconds and are consolidated from various places. While the material is supposed to be the same, it comes from various manufacturing lots and can vary in both width and in depth causing installation issues and less than acceptable results. We met with some folks earlier this year that purchased their flooring through lumber liquidators and they were installing it themselves. The boxes were all full of small 8"- 12" pieces and very few long pieces. They were not the same height and not all the same width. They were manufactured at different times and not necessarily in the same factory. We are happy they did not want us to do the install. We know one installer that finally just walked off a job (didn't ask to get paid) just got out of there before he wasted any more time. It was never going to look good and he just couldn't take the frustration any longer knowing that it was never going to work and he would end up getting blamed anyway.
last Thursday at 2:38pm   
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shars55
I had laminate in my old house and loved it. Not EVERYONE hates it. It was not cheap laminate, however, and it was installed correctly. We had no issues with it...ever. I even had it in the kitchen and a couple of the bathrooms. Unless you dump water all over it and let it sit, it would be fine. I had no problems cleaning it, frankly, it was the easiest floor I ever had. I looked at a few vinyl plank samples, and hated them. They looks so cheap but I'm sure there are good versions of it out there. I have tile now, and would never install tile again. I HATE grout!!!
18 hours ago   
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Cancork Floor Inc.
IF you are keeping the ceramic tiles (as a subfloor) you MUST KNOW the "waviness" scale that your vinyl "needs". Most planked flooring (loose lay, click together and even glue down) have limits as to how wavy the subfloor can be. Tiles are notorious for offering wavy, bumpy subfloors. My cork floating floor planks can handle most tiles, but I know that LVT/Laminates have very limited tolerance levels. Normally the floor is allowed a waviness factor (floor height differences) of 3mm over 3 meters (3mm over 10 feet). Ceramic tiles often produce wavy floors that fall OUTSIDE of these parameters.

Check your tiles to see what work has to be done to install LVT. You may be surprised to find out what has to happen (read: extra expense+extra work) BEFORE you purchase the floor.
15 hours ago   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Blend with the tile color and don't make the grout stand out.
last Thursday at 10:20am      Thanked by swhrt
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swhrt
Thank you Deborah! Their are so many colors in this porcelain we woke up about 330am and laid out a bunch of sample grouts we did go with the lighter shade that blends.
last Thursday at 10:42am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders commented on a discussion
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
You can search prior discussions here on Houzz for information on this. The fees vary by geographic region and by what services you want.
last Thursday at 10:19am      Thanked by mschaefer
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
We generally come in and drywall over them (removing any electrical that might be there) and have the wall repainted.
last Thursday at 9:48am     
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JudyG Designs
last Thursday at 12:08pm     
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amyyou78
Thank so much! It's great to actually See pictures with the bookshelves. I also love the white birch idea!
last Thursday at 1:34pm     
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
We generally take the 5" granite splash out. Yes, it damages the wallboard but you are going to cover than anyway. The worst case is that you will have some touch up type painting to do at the end of the splash where you might not be putting tile back. We have not had any issues with damaging a countertop during the process - although there could be a risk. I don't think that it looks good to tile above a granite splash and it still looks dated. Why create another issue when trying to resolve the first.

I would use a white or light gray subway tile or a marble like the attached. Use grout that matches the tile. Don't go with a contrasting grout color.
last Thursday at 9:38am      Thanked by anniejill
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Unless they are custom made and ginished cabinets, manufacturers no longer stain the interior or the exposed bottoms of cabinets. It can be specified as an upgrade with some companies.
last Wednesday at 10:25am     
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Most cabinet lines that we see today are not painted on the bottom side of the wall cabinets. You can purchase a skin to apply to the bottom or some companies have an upgrade to get them painted. This is true in cabinets at all price ranges. As consumers, when you look at cabinets to purchase this is an item to be aware of and check for.
last Wednesday at 6:48pm   
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smusec
Same here...undersides were not finished. We have dark stained cabinets so I took one of the doors to have paint matched as close as possible to the stain and painted them myself. It was easy! I probably should have primed or sanded but haven't had any problems with peeling or chipping.
last Wednesday at 7:18pm   
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Lynne Mysliwiec
Horrible memories of F*ing Bob, the cabinet guy come floating back....aaargh. The undersides of my cabinets are unpainted and they look like crap. I'm with you. There should be a single, finished panel to join all the cabinets together, then light molding to hide under cabinet lighting.
last Wednesday at 7:24pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
before we answer, how much is to be taken out for the remodel? is the whole kitchen to be torn down to stud walls and everything replaced?
last Wednesday at 11:38am      Thanked by tilleylove
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
I would go with recessed lights placed over the countertops. We generally center cans at 23" from the wall (not upper cabinets) which places them just in front of the lip of the countertop so that you don't cast shadows and block the light when standing at the counter. I personally would not put pendants over your peninsula given the area narrows there and I think it would give the feeling of being too much.
last Wednesday at 12:26pm        Thanked by tilleylove
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tilleylove
@Deborah...if we did small pendants, do you think that would work? I like the idea of small lights there to give light in that space.
last Wednesday at 2:09pm   
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Fred S
If you post a floor plan to scale, on graph paper if you have it, I could give you a layout. I also need to know the type of recessed.
last Wednesday at 3:56pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
might want to call in an engineer to determine options before you get too far.
last Wednesday at 10:26am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
square always looks pretty 'severe' to me and beveled more contemporary. I like a half bullnose.
last Wednesday at 10:22am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
not wild about the idea of the dresser but ee frequently see beds in front of windows. you can actually search for that in the Houzz searchbar and see photos.
last Wednesday at 10:19am      Thanked by jhitt
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groveraxle
There are no rules that cannot be broken depending on the circumstance.
last Wednesday at 10:23am      Thanked by jhitt
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Dytecture
Depends on how much the dresser is covering the window.
last Wednesday at 10:57am      Thanked by jhitt
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Go to the tab above for kitchens and then put stained cabinets in the search box and click on search tool. lots of stained options. most cabinet companies have some form of gray stain.
last Wednesday at 10:17am   
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Wild Infusion
I would use what we call a lime wash paint ...or a chalk paint...I would go light ....or blue and not grey is actually a colour that can flatten your mood....so I would opt for the blue if that were me. I do like the solid blue in the last pic...it has good depth...hope this helps
last Wednesday at 10:19am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
I would leave it as is.
last Wednesday at 9:09am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
The answer would be - that depends. If you can meet all of the requirements from the manufacturer and any local ordinances on clearance to combustible materials, then it is possible.
last Wednesday at 9:06am      Thanked by kaltonr
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders commented on a discussion
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abbyserd
Sorry,I am looking for feedback on Kitchen appliances that people have selected and are satisfied with their selection. I am looking for 36" gas range top, counter depth-french door refrigerators, dishwasher, 30" single convection wall oven and microwave. oops and a hood. I cook a lot...my kitchen is not for dusting...its for real cooking.
last Wednesday at 7:23am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
This is a FAQ here on Houzz. you may want to enter appliances in the search bar and look at some of the existing discussions. there are many.
last Wednesday at 8:17am      Thanked by abbyserd
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
there are regulations regarding combustible material around a fireplace. you need to have someone familiar with the regulations in your area assess what your options are.
last Wednesday at 7:03am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
I would use the casements.
last Wednesday at 6:38am      Thanked by ashiebabie36
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Go to Houzz search bar and enter under stairs storage. Lots of great ideas.
last Wednesday at 6:37am     
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Hi Janet. Can you take the French Country concept of using a wrought iron type railing and modify it to your setting so that you can have french doors that open, but there is no actual balcony. I am on a jobsite right now and can't find photos easily on this tablet, but hopefully that gives you some ideas to go research.
last Wednesday at 6:26am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Do a search here on Houzz for gray and white. There are some stunning rooms.
last Wednesday at 6:08am   
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Bridget
No, you are not being to picky. Do you have a contract? That would give you a chance to have it corrected and they have to pay for it.
last Tuesday at 6:32am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
I would not be happy with the work, but my gut feeling is you are probably getting what you paid for. These are handymen, not professional contractors and there is a huge difference. No true professional does crossover work. A professional tilesetter does not do painting or carpentry. A professional carpenter does not do drywall and painting. No one can do it all and do it well - there is just no way to keep up with a trade and all the best practices unless you specialize. As far as painting stripes, our standard, professional painter would not do this. They would do the base coat and then a faux painter would be called in to complete the work. Research the people you intend to hire thoroughly before commiting.
last Wednesday at 6:04am   
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Rockin' Fine Finish
find a general contractor
July 9, 2014 at 11:45am     
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Look for a reputable remodeling contractor - not a handyman. Make sure you discuss how they are going to do the work and what is included in pricing in terms of painting etc. Ask if they install a sill pan under the newly installed door and how they will flash around the exterior to prevent water intrusion. How will flooring issues be resolved once the wall is removed where the door is going. More to it than just sticking a door in.
last Wednesday at 5:44am     
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
I would create a kitchen ideabook here on Houzz ans add pictures of kitchens that you like. Just be realistic about what can be accomplished in your space. Sit down with the designers and go through the ideabook photos explaining what you do and don't like about each. I would agree that 9 ft ceiling is not enough to do a stacked cabinet unless you are willing to cut the height of the lower ones considerably. 9 ft would not allow room for crown molding. if you are having difficulty envisioning your space, you may want to find a designer that works in 3D.
last Wednesday at 5:18am      Thanked by T connerx5
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PH Interiors, LLC
Hi Patricia, where did you find this picture? I want to add to my idea book. Thanks.
last Wednesday at 7:19am      Thanked by T connerx5
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Patricia Colwell
Just google french country kitchens
last Wednesday at 9:27am      Thanked by T connerx5
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Click on kitchen in the bar above. Once the photos come up, enter Sienna Bordeaux in the search box and then click the search tool. Lots of great photos that show combinations with your granite. I like this one.
last Tuesday at 2:36pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Take a look at the Adex Neri beveled edge subway tile in bone. It is just a barely offwhite/cream color.
last Tuesday at 2:29pm     
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Yes, I would have it inspected again after the work is complete just too be sure. Too much risk not to. I would ask that the builder to refill the tank. Might do it.
last Tuesday at 2:27pm   
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sail2345
Thank you. I hope so. Appreciate your comment.
last Tuesday at 2:29pm   
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Sagent Builders
The gas company will be more than happy to re-check . I would have them check every connection they can. And yes the contractor should refill the tank.
I would also document all the site visits from the gas company and the subs.
last Tuesday at 6:46pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders commented on a discussion
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
I think we have leafguard gutter toppers over our existing gutters. They were guaranteed not to ever stop up, but they did. We also have large, mature trees around one side of our home. I haven't taken the time to try to do anything about it.
last Tuesday at 2:09pm      Thanked by mvtaylor
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ispoildogs
If you are speaking of the company named Leafguard, they tried to hard sell their product to my sister for about 3 times more than my gutters AND guards cost, and I got the premium level guards that were recommended and installed when I bought new gutters (from another company). The inflated price was supposed to be a special discount that would expire if she didn't make the decision immediately. When she told them no, they were able to add one more discount. When she still told them no some manager called her the next day in an attempt to change her mind by extending the expired discount, just for her. They seem to have quite a hustle going. I suggest you do a google search on "leafguard reviews" and run for the hills.
last Tuesday at 7:51pm        Thanked by mvtaylor
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bubbasgma
Big money, huge mark-up, high pressure sales!! Like replacement windows and basement waterproofing!
last Tuesday at 7:59pm        Thanked by mvtaylor
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
If this is a Houzz photo, generally you can go back to the original photo and there will be a series of questions and (hopefully) answers. Generally someone will have already asked that question.
last Tuesday at 2:05pm   
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Mike Duran
I am experiencing a similar issue with these Ikea sink and cabinets, they look great in the store, but our sink is not the size given in the literature or on the box! It is 48.5 inches wide, but my space is 48 inches wide! So frustrating, We opened ticket with Ikea for another sink, but what guarantee that sink will be the correct size_____Any suggestions
July 13, 2014 at 9:10pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
This is not a very encouraging post. We are getting ready to install our first Ikea cabinets for a customer. She selected and purchased the Godmorgon series with the 55" vanity. We have not been thrilled about it and this makes me nervous.
last Tuesday at 2:04pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
kellyvt, how were you able to identify it? Goggle search didn't bring up a manufacturer that I could find. Would be helpful to know for future. Thanks.
last Tuesday at 2:01pm   
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kellyvt
I googled "large floral gold wallcovering" and it showed up with a link to Houzz where it named the manufacturer.
last Tuesday at 4:51pm     
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
I personally would not tile the ceiling. By putting small tile there it draws attention to it and, IMO, makes the room feel smaller. What we do is run crown molding throughout the whole bathroom and then tile up to that. Works fine and it does not get hurt by the moisture - as long as there is a bath fan and you don't use MDF moldings. Yes the use of bullnose would be preferable.
last Tuesday at 1:41pm        Thanked by favoritedog
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
How tall are your ceilings? If you are at 8', then I would go up to the ceiling around the tub and not stop short of that. Starts to look squatty if you stop just above the shower head.
last Tuesday at 1:59pm   
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Linda
I prefer tile all the way to the ceiling, but not on the ceiling. I find that with some tiles, the bullnose tiles are expensive enough that it costs no more money to run the tile to the ceiling than to stop short and buy the trim tiles.

I did once assist on a tile job involving a shower with a slanted ceiling where the tile went all the way up, including the flat ceiling. After that adventure, I was cured of ever wanting to do a tiled ceiling myself

The shower in my 1931 house has a tiled ceiling and cleaning the ceiling grout isn't much fun
last Tuesday at 6:41pm        Thanked by favoritedog
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favoritedog
I have enough bullnose and tile to do it either way. If I cut it short, (just above the shower head) I will have enough subway tiles to do my walls. I would just need a chair rail to top the tiles on the walls. It's looking like most suggestions rule out doing the ceiling. So it's between going all the way up the shower walls only, or capping it short and tiling the bathroom walls also.
last Tuesday at 6:52pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Why not use the same color as the cabinets and not introduce another color into the rooms.
last Tuesday at 1:43pm      Thanked by kimilenertz
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Dytecture
A contractor would be able to hire sub-trades for just moving the mechanical or plumbing lines. For layout ideas an architect would be better suited.
last Tuesday at 12:45pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
A design/build remodeler can assist with layout, design, blueprints and provide a gauge for cost during the process. Regardless of which you start with, an engineer will need to be consulted regarding the removal of walls - unless it is obvious that they are not load bearing.
last Tuesday at 12:52pm   
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Oak & Broad
Deborah I think we are almost always in agreement! Sarah a site finished floor will also allow you and your finisher to pick the exact stain color you want, often with some custom mixing involved. A site finished floor will also not have bevels between the planks. Let me know if you have any other flooring questions.
last Tuesday at 11:50am        Thanked by Sarah Cole
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
I agree with ProSource. Your profile does not indicate in what city you live, but using the Find a Pro on Houzz is a good starting place. I would always contact several individuals and visit their spaces to ensure they have the type of talent you seek. Ask to look through their portfolios before you get too deep into discussions with them. Also there may be home shows, etc in your area where you can visit recent work of local designers. One of the things to ask when you see spaces you like is whether that organization actually did all of the design or was it a collaboration of kitchen designer, interior decorator, architect and/or contractor working together. Having looked at a lot of spaces here on Houzz, the ones that I see that are truly well put together both functionally and aesthetically are generally the result of a group effort.

A couple of other points. Creating a customized design is an iterative, collaborative process and requires active participation from all parties involved. This can include creating ideabooks on Houzz of things that wow you or creating a paper folder with photos from magazines. Specific feedback on preliminary design ideas is essential so that the designer(s) has a clear understanding of what one likes and dislikes about an option and the same mistakes are then not repeated in subsequent designs. Budget also has a great deal to do with the wow factor of a room and many times consumers believe they have a huge budget, when in fact it is modest for the work they wish to accomplish. So it helps to make sure the budget and project scope are congruent. I make these points only because we have seen projects stall or fall apart because of one or the other of these - neither may apply to you but always something to keep in mind.

If space allows, while not a requirement, I believe that it is always nice to have a casual eating area for everyday use. We do know families that don't ever eat at home, but it is a nice option to have and I do think it makes a difference for resale. While we could eat at the island, in 26 years at our home we have never done so - it just isn't relaxing and is not conducive to conversation. The island is a great place for gathering with friends. What I don't think works is to stick a table in a space that is too small or in an awkward location - but it doesn't sound like you will have that issue with the correct design of the remainder of the room.

Good luck on your project.
last Tuesday at 12:28pm        Thanked by iamwoofgang
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iamwoofgang
Thank you very Deborah Butler, your feedback is exactly what I was looking for in that you answered the two question I have (and brought up valid points for consideration as well.) I have created an ideabook and have showed it to the two places I have worked with thus far. I've also utilized the "find a pro" feature and have checked portfolios and contacted those I liked. I have a big concern about making the island so large that we can no longer have a casual eating area but the designer keeps assuring me that won't be a problem for resale. I have decided to ask a realtor for some input as well. Thank you for taking the time to respond.
last Wednesday at 9:51am   
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iamwoofgang
FYI - I am in MI.
last Wednesday at 11:26am   
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