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Caesarstone Countertops Reviews - The Good and Bad?

Lauren O
August 17, 2017

I'm looking to redesign my kitchen and I'd like to go with either Silestone or Caesarstone. I've read about chipping for both stones, staining, etc. but I'm just in disbelief? Is one far more superior than the other?

Comments (56)

  • mercurygirl

    Yup, true. Rust, red wine, etc. have all cleaned up. I guess my shopping cart is the mister who works vigorously at washing up and such. There is one largish chip right in front of the sink that I think was repaired twice, but just couldn't hold up to the traffic. I keep hoping for a newer material for a permanent fix. I'd still recommend, though, I don't require perfection.

  • Toronto Veterinarian

    I too considered Silestone and Caesarstone, and I considered the quality to be pretty much equal. One of the things that led me away from Silestone and towards Caesarstone (and Viatera) was it's bacteriostatic surface, becausI think it's possible to be too anti-bacteria, and I couldn't get any specific information on the safety of what made it bacteriostatic. Then I found a colour I liked better in Caesarstone, and that was the end of my deciding.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    mercurygirl:


    You don't need a different material, you need a different edge profile.

  • mercurygirl

    Sorry for thread hijacking, but while Joseph is present...

    By newer material, I meant for the repair. I have threatened replacement, but my thrift will likely prevent that. I never asked about a different edge, can it be done in place? Any info or links are much appreciated!

    See attached pics.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    "Can it be done in place?"


    Yes, but it can be a bit dusty/messy.


    If you had the chip, I'd try to glue it back in place and polish. A filled chip in that color/particulate won't be very inconspicuous. You can probably have the whole edge ripped off and re-profiled in place. That's more expensive, but it's a foolproof repair and will probably knock your overhang consistency off a bit.

  • mercurygirl

    Nope, no chip to glue. Countertop is eight years old, that chip happened fairly early on. They repaired it, but it came loose, or got banged again, not sure and may be worse now. Countertop is U shaped, sink in center. Would they do all of the edges? I guess I'll contact the installers again. Somewhere I saw something about repairs using superglue, is it advisable for temporary fix?

    Thanks again! MG


    Lauren O thanked mercurygirl
  • Lauren O

    Thank you all for this!! I'm leaning more towards Caesarstone based on reviews and videos I've watched online, but anyways I am actually going to check them out this weekend and compare the feel and quality of each company.

  • mayanl5

    Hi we have had both. For our new kitchen we did the brightest white Ceasarstone bought within the IKEA sale. Been installed a little over a year. We have very minor pitting near the sink. I am ultra careful with heavy cast iron. Any stains come out with Softscrub. Metal marks with the liquid Barkeepers friend. I am happy with it and like the clean white look. Previously we had the black Silestone with the sparkles which is now in our new laundry room. Still love it and it was a workhorse in the previous kitchen. Also had pitting near the sink which showed up more due to dark color. Had some knife gouges but that was definitely our fault. Good luck

    Lauren O thanked mayanl5
  • mayflowers

    They are the same product because they use the same manufacturing technology, patented and licensed by Breton. Cambria and many others that use Breton are the same too. Chinese quartz is a different technology that the Chinese copied instead of licensing from Breton. "Copied" is the nice way of describing what China does to other countries' technology.

    http://www.breton.it/engineeredstone/en/home#ad-image-0

    Lauren O thanked mayflowers
  • mercurygirl

    Reporting back on my CS issues. Installer cannot redo the edge profile. They're coming out next week to repair chips, etc. I'm actually thinking of replacing the countertop in a year or so. DH probably won't like it, but I'm not as enamored as I used to be. Part of the appeal was the environmental stuff, but honestly, I want something pretty that I don't have to baby, and there are so many alternatives. Using the old for laundry/storage is very smart. I wish you luck in your choice, Lauren.

  • kazmom

    Mercurygirl - what are you thinking will be sturdier? Everyone is pushing Quartz at us because they say it is tough and doesn't have to be babied. What are you thinking of changing too?

  • mercurygirl

    Oh sorry, I don't really know if that will even happen. However, I've seen some interesting kitchens with laminate type surfaces, even stainless steel! Maybe rethink soapstone...it's nice to dream, LOL.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    "Everyone is pushing Quartz at us because they say it is tough and doesn't have to be babied."


    Everyone is wrong. Quartz is fine, but it is much more heat sensitive than other tops and scratches, while difficult to get, can be much more difficult to remove than those in stone.

  • Chessie

    From everything I have read, quartz is fine with heat, unless you take a blowtorch to it, or subject it to high heat for a period of time. I have set pots of boiling water on my quartz, to test it. Left them there until the water cooled. Absolutely no effect. But it could be that the resins are different for different brands, and that may account for less heat-tolerance in some.

  • kazmom
    Thanks Joseph. What would you recommend that wears well? I am not looking for something I can be stupid with, just something that looks nice, is pretty tough and can be gotten in a light color. We have been looking primarily at Quartz and granite. Is there something else we should be considering?
  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    Chess:

    Thought you may like to see pictures of your future:

    You fix that one with a sink with a drainboard.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    strob06:


    Take a look at Geoluxe, please.

  • kelly t

    Quartz is NOT impervious and definitely never take a blowtorch to it! i know you are kidding. However one thing I heard you could take a blowtorch to Neolith! Applications are a bit limited though but it's tough from what I hear!

  • Chessie

    Joseph Corlett, LLC, LOL. Nope - not my future. I already have tested it. No issues. For what it's worth though, I don't sit wet dishes on the counter anyway - never have. If I am handwashing, I let them dry in the sink. And honestly, I never sit hot pans on a counter. I'm just not one that ever does that. I only tried it on my quartz to satisfy my own curiosity.

  • Chessie

    kelly t, I was referring to a video that someone posted where they do take a blowtorch to the quartz - to show how it will scorch under fire. Not sure why anyone would ever do that in their home though. :-)

    As to Neolith - depends on your taste. I don't care for the look if it, but perhaps the places I saw it did not have a full set of samples. Also I have read that it is difficult to fabricate, and there have been some serious chipping and cracking issues.

  • kelly t

    Joseph Corlett, LLC, when you say you solve that with a dish rack, are you talking about a cover up? Does putting wet dishes on quartz or quartzite/marble hurt it? I put a towel down and put just washed dishes on it to air dry sometimes.

  • kelly t

    ok i am having a challenge. How did you get the people you were responding to to be highlighted in green in your responses?



  • Chessie

    kelly t, highlight and copy the name, and then paste it in your reply. :-)

  • Jacob Lamm

    Don't buy either. Stick with Granite. Ceasarstone is a bad choice. I keep getting more chips. The company does not stand behind the product. They keep sending me to the installer who sends me back to them. I can't understand why people keep buying it. I guess it looks really nice. don't get lured in like i did.

  • pippabean

    Jacob Lamm - Are your chips at the edges? If so, what type of edge do you have? I believe the shorter the radius of the edge, the more likely it will chip, no matter the brand of quartz.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    "Joseph Corlett, LLC, when you say you solve that with a dish rack, are you talking about a cover up?"


    No, I'm talking about removing the sink and replacing it with one with a built-in drainboard.

  • Jacob Lamm

    My counters chip both at the edges and in the center of the counters. Not just on the squared edges.

  • PRO
    Quartz - Stone Care, Cleaning & Repair Experts

    kelly t another industry myth - if you take a blow torch to Neolith or any other porcelain product will will end up with a far bigger problem than on any Quartz Product.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    "kelly t another industry myth - if you take a blow torch to Neolith or any other porcelain product will will end up with a far bigger problem than on any Quartz Product."


    QSCCRE:


    Sir, you are all hat and no cattle. Porcelain is immune to a blowtorch, quartz will fail in minutes.

  • PRO
    Quartz - Stone Care, Cleaning & Repair Experts

    Joseph Corlett, LLC you really have no idea, do you on modern surfaces. If you have not experience it or have vast knowledge of the information.... I suggest you SIMPLY do not comment. Will save the embarrassment.

    The photo is a porcelain (neolith to be exact) work surface that the client applied a blow torch to to glaze or alter some sugar on a baking sheet

    The result a heat point causing a triangle crack.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    Woah there Cowboy. Now your talking about a fabricated product that could have had a stress riser created at fabrication that birthed the crack. Take a blowtorch to an unfabricated piece of estone and and unfabricated piece of sintered and get back to us, please. This scenario more accurately reflects your generalization.

  • PRO
    Quartz - Stone Care, Cleaning & Repair Experts

    Joseph Corlett, LLC mate I would quite while you are behind. Your comments are that way off it would not be funny. A stress crack in porcelain during installation would shatter it in that area when installed.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    "kelly t another industry myth - if you take a blow torch to Neolith or any other porcelain product will will end up with a far bigger problem than on any Quartz Product."

    QSCCRE:

    Let's dissect your comment a little more closely, shall we? You never used any qualifiers. Had you said something like "We have had customers that have had sintered edge failures while using a blowtorch on their countertops.", I may have said something like, "That's interesting, please elaborate."

    No, instead you use a giant blanket to label ALL sintered tops as less heat resistant than engineered stone tops. This is fantasy. I can burn an engineered stone top with PADS, let alone a blowtorch.

    Here's quartz burned with a pad.

  • PRO
    Quartz - Stone Care, Cleaning & Repair Experts

    That us just very poor workmanship Nothing to do with the stone, if you where a stonemason you would know that and would never have caused that issue in the first place. My advice leave quartz to the professionals. I assume you have seen blow torch damage on Quartz a sparkler let on the surface burning will give the same temperature ranges

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    QSCRE:

    We finally agree, it is poor workmanship, but when did I say it was mine? I did not and it is not.

    Being a stone mason has nothing whatsoever to do with quartz restoration.

    The same top after I removed the pad burns:

    My customers were delighted that they took your advice and left the quartz to the professional.

  • Phil W
    Don’t recommend Caesarstone. Had it installed through IKEA in April 17 and it was chipped on backsplash and on unused section by Jul 17. Company says chips not covered by warranty. Now dealing with installer for repairs but based on others' reviews, expect those to be temporary.
  • Chessie

    How in the heck does one chip a backsplash?

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    You chip a backsplash by hiring incompetent help.

  • Chessie

    Well I can see that of course, but I guess I thought he was saying it was chipped in normal kitchen usage.

  • PRO
    Quartz - Stone Care, Cleaning & Repair Experts

    The chip might be where they have not left enough expansion gap and it has jammed with movement against something.


  • Emma Gamble

    Hi All,

    From a kitchen designer's perspective I like to chuck a few facts out there and let my clients decide for themselves what benefits them best

    - Caesar Stone is an engineered stone. Most man made stones come with a 10 year warranty backed by the supplier and the manufacture. Caesar stone is one of the best known brands of man made stone and have one of the best colour selections to choose from. Caesar Stone should not discolour, stain, chip or crack and will be covered under their warranty within reason (for example, if you leave red wine on the bench over night could possibly stain the surface or sit a hot pot directly from the stone onto the surface can cause the stone to crack suddenly). You can download and read about Caesar stone's warranty here

    - Silestone is again, another engineered stone with a colour range that varies depending on the country you are in. In my personal opinion I do prefer Caesar stone's colour range but that's a decision obviously made by the client! However, the key thing about Silestone is that it does offer a whooping 25 year warranty! This is massive and well worth it considering a client pays so much for their stone top they would expect it to be built to last and this way you avoid needing to replace it sooner. You can download the warranty brochure here.

    I haven't had the time to read through the entire string of comments here but I think the important thing to remember here is that if you have had a bad experience with either stone is that it is a man made product and due to human error sometimes things do go wrong. I have, on a very odd occasion contacted suppliers to have their reps sent to site to evaluate the bench top defects and have it replaced. You need to keep in mind that there is a reason that these guys are known around the world and it's because of their superior product and service :)

    I hope this is helpful to you!

    Emma

  • Chessie

    Ummm...I think everyone on this forum knows all about quartz now. Plenty of experience here. To say that it will it not chip is nonsense - I don’t care WHAT the brand is.

  • PRO
    Quartz - Stone Care, Cleaning & Repair Experts

    Emma Gamble If you think especially Caesarstone will cover "discolour, stain, chip or crack and will be covered under their warranty within reason (for example, if you leave red wine on the bench over night could possibly stain the surface or sit a hot pot directly from the stone onto the surface can cause the stone to crack suddenly). "

    Then you are sadly mistaken and again their marketing machine has done its job. As for Caesarstone has the best stone and range of colour, We would suggest the above applies again....

    FYI - if you actually read the the NEW ZEALAND warranty which Laminex is the distributor of caesarstone in NZ. you will see

    PS- your link is not to the actual warranty.... it is to their site.

    Here is the actual warranty, which by the way is exactly the same as Australia as the product is supplied out of Caesarstone AU and the warranty claims are handled out of Australia as well.

    http://www.caesarstone.com.au/Portals/0/Documents/2015%20Caesarstone%20Warranty%20Guide.pdf

    You will actually note the first point on exclusions negate all your claims... nothing you have listed is covered by the warranty!

    As for Caesarstone superior service.... this is a recent comment from a client just about cleaning and caring for Caesarstone.... So if this is their attitude to care what do you think it will be about any warranty claim...... All we will say what caesarstone do well and extremely well is targeting Designers, Architects etc and brainwashing them.

    If Caesarstone own branded cleaning products which are all Caustic with a pH between 9 for the spray cleaner and 11.5 for the cream cleaner which are known to damage any stone let alone quartz.... Plus the fact this range is outside the range they specific in the USA and Canada... but it is the same quartz made by the same company....... What hope do you think they actually know what they are talking about with anything else......That is why we get clients contacting us about simple things on how to stop their product from fingerprinting.

    All other major brand do not have have the issues around this, hence they have a superior product.

    Thankfully the other major brands like silestone, technistone, quantum quartz, smartstone do not suffer from the extremely poor service or qa issues or need to put a list of out on their warranty as the products are of better quality.

  • eric lim

    sharing this to everyone on my encounter using ceaserstone 2141 white with two color tone due to two difference slab used. beware their product claim and warranty coverage and putting the blame on installer for not using same slab. here is the reply I got from them

    Caesarstone slabs are manufactured from natural
    materials and naturally occurring variations in appearance in the long term
    caused by artificial or natural light are not covered by the Caesarstone
    warranty.

    In order to prevent shade variations, we instruct the fabricator to follow the Caesarstone
    installation instructions, that when installing 2 or more slabs they must make
    sure to use slabs from the same batch (please see instructions to fabricators
    below). Regarding your case, the fabricator should have installed the
    countertops from slabs in the same batch. Therefore I am sorry to tell you that
    the Caesarstone warranty does not cover this case.

    anyone here can advise what should I do???

  • Chessie

    Contact your fabricator.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    eric: Pictures, please.

  • Editha Canlas

    I just had our ceasarstone quartz installed. There is a big stain on the part by the sink. My husband and I realized that it's from the glue the installers used. I called them and the installer company rep told me they're going to fix it. I will keep you posted.



    Before it was installed, it took us time to decide what design or pattern to purchase. We decided to order CS Ginger based on their 4" x 4" sample. I ordered it from one of the Big Box stores. The sales person never advised me to look for the big slab somewhere else (as they don't have it in the store). Huge mistake!!!! When the countertop arrived, I was quite disappointed on how it looks. It has blue blotches. Here are the photos:





    There's a dime on one of the photos to show the size of one of the blue blotches. I call them blotches, not specks.


    Before deciding on what to buy, do your research.

  • Chessie

    I would never EVER order a many-thousands-dollars countertop from a 4” sample. Come on. Surely this is common sense?

  • HU-646837322

    I had a terrible experience with Ceaserstone counter and with the costumer service. I tried washing my counters with all the “recommended” cleaning products and my counter continues to look unfresh and dirty, with swirls of water. To fix the issue the company sends out a man with Windex, paper towels and chemicals in a metal container you would never use in the kitchen! Than they proceed to clean the counter in about 3 steps and rub it down until it looks okay with paper towels - it takes 20 minutes at a minimum. They make you feel bad in the process because how could I have dirty counters. All the work lasts exactly 1 second until something is placed on a counter, at which point you can’t spot clean but have to clean all of it! Dark colors are blamed as hard to clean, except I have a dark natural counter in my bathroom and it never looks nasty like my kitchen Ceaserstone countertop. Unbelievably terrible product and only lies from costumer service.

  • Anna Stem

    We had Caesarstone counters installed in the summer of 2017; color is Concrete 2003. Within a few months we started to notice small chips in the surface that looked like white dots. There are now over a dozen small chips in the countertop surface all over the kitchen. We are not unusually hard on our counters; in fact I would say we are more careful than many folks. The counters seem to be chipping at random and at every chip the white interior material shows. I contacted customer service and was told surface chips are not covered by the warranty. I wish wish we had never purchased Caesarstone! I do NOT recommend them.

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