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Terraced House Living Room Ideas & Photos

Terrace house
Terrace house
Kate Cleveland Architect
Tom Crane Photography
Living room - small transitional formal and enclosed light wood floor living room idea in Philadelphia with beige walls, a standard fireplace, a plaster fireplace and no tv
Broadway Terrace House
Broadway Terrace House
Robert Nebolon Architects
Broadway Terrace House: Daylight filled living room Photographer: David Duncan Livingston
Inspiration for a modern living room remodel in San Francisco
Cobble Hill, Brooklyn Brownstone
Cobble Hill, Brooklyn Brownstone
Bonaventura Architect
Please see this Award Winning project in the October 2014 issue of New York Cottages & Gardens Magazine: NYC&G http://www.cottages-gardens.com/New-York-Cottages-Gardens/October-2014/NYCG-Innovation-in-Design-Winners-Kitchen-Design/ It was also featured in a Houzz Tour: Houzz Tour: Loving the Old and New in an 1880s Brooklyn Row House http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/29691278/list/houzz-tour-loving-the-old-and-new-in-an-1880s-brooklyn-row-house Photo Credit: Hulya Kolabas
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1512 Dolphin Terrace
1512 Dolphin Terrace
Spinnaker Development
Built, designed & furnished by Spinnaker Development, Newport Beach Interior Design by Details a Design Firm Photography by Bowman Group Photography
Golf Dream House
Golf Dream House
BCBE Custom Homes
This spacious living room expands out to the outdoor living. Photographer: Giovanni Photography
Inspiration for a huge transitional open concept medium tone wood floor living room remodel in Miami with beige walls and no fireplace
Broadway Terrace House
Broadway Terrace House
Robert Nebolon Architects
Broadway Terrace House: Daylight filled living room Photographer: David Duncan Livingston
Minimalist medium tone wood floor living room photo in San Francisco with white walls
Podolsky Terrace House
Podolsky Terrace House
Marc McCollom Architect
Living Room and Backyard viewed from the Entry Hall, with the Family Room beyond at the right. The fireplace surround and shelf are Soapstone. Photo by Charles Davis Smith AIA
Villa Terra
Villa Terra
Noel Cross+Architects
WHAT MAKES VILLA TERRA GREEN? 1. Rammed Earth and PISE Walls Beyond it’s beautiful qualities and “Old World” look, the rammed earth and PISE walls (pneumatically impacted stabilized earth) drastically reduce the use of trees for the initial wall framing lumber. And because this “Earth Structure” will far outlast any wood frame building, trees are again saved many times over, creating the foundation for the true model of sustainability. We have created a house that will essentially last forever, instead of having to be rebuilt every 50 to 75 years. The 18” thick PISE walls and concrete floors also provide thermal mass, an integral part of the passive solar design of the house. These features help keep the house naturally cooler in summer and retaining heat in winter, greatly reducing the heating and cooling loads and energy use. 2. High Content Fly Ash Concrete Foundation Use of high content (25%) fly ash (industrial waste byproduct) in place of Portland Cement results in reduction of energy consumption and green house gas emissions associated with Portland cement production (second only to petroleum in terms of carbon dioxide emissions). 3. Reclaimed Plumbing Fixtures All lavatory sinks and tubs were bought from salvage yards (tub is reportedly from the Jack Benny house in Hollywood). Reclaimed Carrara marble fountain has been made into the powder room sink. 4. Natural Daylighting Use of numerous skylights and high transom windows to reduce electrical lighting loads during the day. Natural daylighting also has documented benefits on mood, productivity, and enjoyment of the space. 5. Photo Voltaic Solar Panels Use of PV solar electric generation system to reduce electrical grid consumption, and bi-directional meter sends power back to the grid when it is needed most, on hot summer afternoons. 6. Hydronic Radiant Heat Floor Use of hydronic radiant floor heating system saves energy, is more efficient for residential heating, is more comfortable for inhabitants, and promotes superior indoor air quality over forced air systems. 7. Natural/Passive Ventilation Use of operable skylights operable high windows and ceiling fans, creates a natural convection current, thereby eliminating the need for an air conditioning system. 8. Passive Solar Design Use of extensive east and south facing glass, proper overhangs, high interior mass, deciduous grape vines on appropriately placed trellises, to passively heat the home in winter, and protect the house from unnecessary heat gain in summer. 9. Reclaimed Lumber - Douglas fir ceiling beams reclaimed from the Town & Country Village Shopping Center (now Santana Row) in San Jose. - Douglas fir ceiling decking reclaimed from the 118 year old Notre Dame High School in downtown San Jose. TJI joists reclaimed from the “Millenium Man” movie set in Alameda used for floor and roof framing. Redwood ceiling beams reclaimed from a Los Altos cabana/trellis. 10. Extensive Use of Other Reclaimed Materials Two antique reclaimed European stone fireplace mantles grace the family room and master bedroom fireplaces. Interior doors with glass knobs reclaimed from the original house located at the property. Two large terraces utilize used brick salvaged from at least 15 different locations. Courtyard fountain is tiled using recycled and restored ceramic tiles from a 1928 California Colonial house in Los Altos. Cabinet lumber from original house used for closet shelving. Plywood from crates that the windows and doors were delivered in were used to create garage shear walls. Foundation forms were salvaged and rip cut for use as interior stud walls. Garage doors were salvaged from a remodel project in Mountain View. 11. Ground Source Heat Pump - Ground source heat pump uses geothermal energy to heat the house and domestic water, greatly reducing natural gas and fossil fuel consumption. 12. Low VOC Paint Clay Plaster Wall Finishes VOC-free interior paint and stain finishes promotes healthy indoor air quality, reduces exacerbation of respiratory ailments such as asthma and lung cancer. Extensive use of American Clay Plaster integral color wall finish eliminates need for painted walls. 13. High Efficiency Windows Use of energy efficient dual pane thermal glazing with “Low e” coating at all doors and windows reduces heat gain in summer and heat loss in winter, cutting energy use. 14. Engineered Structural Lumber Extensive use of engineered lumber for structural framing and sheathing reduces cutting of old growth forests, and encourages use of “crop lumber”. 15. FSC Certified Mill Work Extensive use of FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) certified sustainable lumber products for cabinetry, hardwood flooring, trim, etc. further protects the environment through third party monitoring and certification of the entire supply chain. 16. Cotton Insulation Formaldehyde-free cotton insulation made from recycled blue jeans used extensively for attic insulation. photography by Frank Paul Perez
Windsor Terrace House
Windsor Terrace House
Francis Dzikowski Photography Inc.
Francis Dzikowski
Example of a mid-sized trendy dark wood floor living room design in New York with white walls, a standard fireplace, a media wall and a stone fireplace
1512 Dolphin Terrace
1512 Dolphin Terrace
Spinnaker Development
Built, designed & furnished by Spinnaker Development, Newport Beach Interior Design by Details a Design Firm Photography by Bowman Group Photography
Sunset Terrace
Sunset Terrace
Allan Edwards Builder Inc.
Example of a french country formal living room design in Houston with a standard fireplace, a stone fireplace and no tv
Laurelhurst Residence
Laurelhurst Residence
Prestige Residential Construction
Contractor: Prestige Residential Construction Architects: DeForest Architects; Interior Design: NB Design Group; Photo: Benjamin Benschneider
Living room - contemporary open concept living room idea in Seattle with beige walls and a two-sided fireplace
Treetops House
Treetops House
Specht Architects
Treetops House The Treetops House is a renovation and major expansion of a 1955 suburban ranch house. The project presented some interesting questions of preservation vs change, as well as a compelling story of dealing with a challenging (and ultimately rewarding) site. The original house was very typical for its time and place—a sprawling single-story, fairly nondescript affair that had small windows, and was clad entirely in Texas limestone. Our challenge was to turn this into a modern house that was open, bright, and inviting, while not completely obliterating all traces of what had existed before. Part of our philosophy is that elements of the history of a place be retained and incorporated into any new design. There are characteristics of almost any design, regardless of how banal, that embody memories and a sense of neighborhood. We feel that preserving these adds depth to any new intervention. With the Treetops House, we largely maintained the entire limestone perimeter wall, and used it as a heavy plinth on which a new second level was added. The new upper level features large frameless glass windows and is filled with light. The interior was opened up to create double-height spaces that bring this light from above and into the center of the house. The new composition is one which is clearly of its time, but also respects and reflects the time and place in which the original house was created. The house is on a site that straddles a fault in the limestone base strata below. Water continuously flows up through this fault and flows out onto the property. The original 1955 house featured a foundation with extremely deep concrete piers that allowed the house to bear on more stable strata far below the surface. Given that building new piers was cost-prohibitive, we did not expand the house’s footprint at all, but cantilevered the new second level out from the existing structure. This strategy not only allowed for the house to be within budget, but also gave it a distinctive dynamic expression. The different materials and profiles of the first and second floors emphasize the house’s horizontality and create another kind stratum that is visual and expressive. Inside the house, a double-height entry hall features stairs that lead up to the second-level main living space. The perimeter of this space is made up of frameless glass is set atop a continuous planter wall that provides a green foreground to the treescape beyond. Large overhangs provide shade at all times of the day, and the surrounding cladding of charred cypress prevents glare and adds a textural counterpoint. Other features include a large kitchen with countertop-height serving windows that open out onto a pool terrace and entertaining area, as well as unique built-in storage and display elements.Landscaping is entirely comprised of native grasses and other low-maintenance plantings. Architect: Specht Architects Contractor: Spencer Construction Photography: Casey Dunn
1512 Dolphin Terrace
1512 Dolphin Terrace
Spinnaker Development
Built, designed & furnished by Spinnaker Development, Newport Beach Interior Design by Details a Design Firm Photography by Bowman Group Photography
Former Vicarage Renovation, South East
Former Vicarage Renovation, South East
Cherie Lee Interiors
Transitional living room photo in Hertfordshire
Casa Lluvia Blanca
Casa Lluvia Blanca
House + House Architects
Nestled into the quiet middle of a block in the historic center of the beautiful colonial town of San Miguel de Allende, this 4,500 square foot courtyard home is accessed through lush gardens with trickling fountains and a luminous lap-pool. The living, dining, kitchen, library and master suite on the ground floor open onto a series of plant filled patios that flood each space with light that changes throughout the day. Elliptical domes and hewn wooden beams sculpt the ceilings, reflecting soft colors onto curving walls. A long, narrow stairway wrapped with windows and skylights is a serene connection to the second floor ''Moroccan' inspired suite with domed fireplace and hand-sculpted tub, and "French Country" inspired suite with a sunny balcony and oval shower. A curving bridge flies through the high living room with sparkling glass railings and overlooks onto sensuously shaped built in sofas. At the third floor windows wrap every space with balconies, light and views, linking indoors to the distant mountains, the morning sun and the bubbling jacuzzi. At the rooftop terrace domes and chimneys join the cozy seating for intimate gatherings.
Casa Lluvia Blanca
Casa Lluvia Blanca
House + House Architects
Nestled into the quiet middle of a block in the historic center of the beautiful colonial town of San Miguel de Allende, this 4,500 square foot courtyard home is accessed through lush gardens with trickling fountains and a luminous lap-pool. The living, dining, kitchen, library and master suite on the ground floor open onto a series of plant filled patios that flood each space with light that changes throughout the day. Elliptical domes and hewn wooden beams sculpt the ceilings, reflecting soft colors onto curving walls. A long, narrow stairway wrapped with windows and skylights is a serene connection to the second floor ''Moroccan' inspired suite with domed fireplace and hand-sculpted tub, and "French Country" inspired suite with a sunny balcony and oval shower. A curving bridge flies through the high living room with sparkling glass railings and overlooks onto sensuously shaped built in sofas. At the third floor windows wrap every space with balconies, light and views, linking indoors to the distant mountains, the morning sun and the bubbling jacuzzi. At the rooftop terrace domes and chimneys join the cozy seating for intimate gatherings.
Tribeca penthouse Living Room
Tribeca penthouse Living Room
Marie Burgos Design
An amazing architectural space with floor to ceiling, wall to wall windows, providing incredible light to this penthouse in the heart of Tribeca. With the designer’s instinctive implementation of Feng Shui in all of her designs, she incorporated fundamental Feng Shui principles, the five natural elements and the concept of yin and yang to create the lay out that would bring in the perfect energy flow. Beautiful wood floorings, numerous light sources, clean lines, combination of straight and curvy shapes, vibrant colors, metal, white and glass pieces and modern art pieces create an interesting gallery which gives this space its unique “eclat” Photographer: Scott Morris
Terrace House
Terrace House
Murphy Mears Architects
Photo: Tria Giovan | Veranda
Living room - large mediterranean formal and enclosed limestone floor and multicolored floor living room idea in Houston with white walls, a standard fireplace, a stone fireplace and no tv
Earlsfield SW18: Stunning Victorian Terrace Renovation
Earlsfield SW18: Stunning Victorian Terrace Renovation
Battersea Builders
Full renovation of a Victorian terrace house including loft and side return extensions, full interior refurbishment and garden landscaping to create a beautiful family home. A blend of traditional and modern design elements were expertly executed to deliver a light, stylish and inviting space. Photo Credits : Simon Richards
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